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Four Ways to Agile Your Tech Team

Agile organizations fared substantially better than their non-agile counterparts in performance metrics as per research from the Project Management Institute. For example: 75% their goals compared to 56% of non-agile organizations 65% finished projects on time compared to 40% of non-agile organizations 67% finished projects on budget compared to 45% of non-agile organizations Revenue grew 37% faster Agile organizations generated 30% more profits    Clearly, there are benefits to using agile methods, and tech teams, in particular, can benefit from this project management approach. Here’s how you can train your team on the Agile methodology. 1. Use the Agile Manifesto The first step of becoming agile is introducing your team to the Agile Manifesto. A total of 12 principles make up its core. You can teach the principles through exercises and assignments.The emphasis of these exercises is self-discovery rather than just teaching. For example, begin with asking your team about the manifesto. Let them discuss the principles with each other. Then, hold a brainstorming session with your team to list the principles that will be effective in group discussions. You can then give them a written assignment to apply principles to their current software development styles. The aim of these assignments is to adopt and memorize the principles. One great way to teach the basics—especially for new tech teams—is to create a simple fill-in-the-blanks exercise. 2. Live training rather than theoryThe Agile methodology is best learned through real life examples. There are different applications of agile, like Scrum, XP, Crystal, and Kanban, which your team may be familiar with, but it is still useful to go through examples. Live training is suitable for intermediates and experts in Agile methodology. Follow the steps below to help your tech team learn agile in live examples: Start a project based on your current methodology, like Scrum or XP Define the scope and goals of the project Design guidelines for project requirements Develop a software function Integrate the function with the agile methods Test the function If the test is successful, move to next function and repeat steps 4-6 Record errors if the test is unsuccessful and include changes until the function works Reprioritize project objectives based on client feedback Release the function to the market, once you incorporate feedback Move on to the next product and repeat steps 4-10 until the project is complete One of the best ways to implement Agile is to have your team members complete online course certifications.  3. “We,” not “I” Collaboration needs to be at the core of the agile implementation for the process to work properly. This is because the key stakeholders of the agile method are the customer and cross-functional teams. There needs to be proper communication and inclusion so that they can provide proper iterations to make the final product.  During training, emphasize collaborative frameworks. Include customer use cases in live training to highlight how customers can collaborate on the final product. You should focus on creating a collaborative and user-focused environment. The first step is to reorganize your team dynamics to create opportunities for collaboration. Have your tech team members work together in pairs, programming, and peer testing. 4. Hire an Agile CoachBefore hiring an agile coach, it is important to know your budget and your timeline. Coordinate live projects your tech team is working on using agile methods. An agile coach should use live examples from existing projects to make training more relevant for your team. There are two styles of agile coaching: push-based and pull-based. Pull-based coaching subconsciously engages team members to adapt principles and values by giving consistent, encouraging feedback. This method facilitates learning with minimal involvement of the coach. Push-based coaching technique is when the coach plays a direct role in imparting knowledge. More on teaching the Agile Methodology When adopting agile project management, managers should emphasize collaboration and customer engagement. They should focus on work fluidity and teamwork, on the “we” and not the “I” mentality. If properly implemented, this dynamic project management method can realize great results for a tech team. If you get it right, you stand to boast, happier, healthier, and more engaged employees overall.
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Four Ways to Agile Your Tech Team

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Four Ways to Agile Your Tech Team

Agile organizations fared substantially better than their non-agile counterparts in performance metrics as per research from the Project Management Institute. For example: 

  • 75% their goals compared to 56% of non-agile organizations 
  • 65% finished projects on time compared to 40% of non-agile organizations 
  • 67% finished projects on budget compared to 45% of non-agile organizations 
  • Revenue grew 37% faster 
  • Agile organizations generated 30% more profits    

Clearly, there are benefits to using agile methods, and tech teams, in particular, can benefit from this project management approach. 

Here’s how you can train your team on the Agile methodology. 

1. Use the Agile Manifesto 

The first step of becoming agile is introducing your team to the Agile Manifesto. A total of 12 principles make up its core. 

You can teach the principles through exercises and assignments.The emphasis of these exercises is self-discovery rather than just teaching. 

For example, begin with asking your team about the manifesto. Let them discuss the principles with each other. Then, hold a brainstorming session with your team to list the principles that will be effective in group discussions. You can then give them a written assignment to apply principles to their current software development styles. The aim of these assignments is to adopt and memorize the principles. 

One great way to teach the basics—especially for new tech teams—is to create a simple fill-in-the-blanks exercise. 

2. Live training rather than theory

The Agile methodology is best learned through real life examples. There are different applications of agile, like Scrum, XP, Crystal, and Kanban, which your team may be familiar with, but it is still useful to go through examples. Live training is suitable for intermediates and experts in Agile methodology. Follow the steps below to help your tech team learn agile in live examples: 

  1. Start a project based on your current methodology, like Scrum or XP 
  2. Define the scope and goals of the project 
  3. Design guidelines for project requirements 
  4. Develop a software function 
  5. Integrate the function with the agile methods 
  6. Test the function 
  7. If the test is successful, move to next function and repeat steps 4-6 
  8. Record errors if the test is unsuccessful and include changes until the function works 
  9. Reprioritize project objectives based on client feedback 
  10. Release the function to the market, once you incorporate feedback 
  11. Move on to the next product and repeat steps 4-10 until the project is complete 

One of the best ways to implement Agile is to have your team members complete online course certifications.  

3. “We,” not “I” 

Collaboration needs to be at the core of the agile implementation for the process to work properly. This is because the key stakeholders of the agile method are the customer and cross-functional teams. There needs to be proper communication and inclusion so that they can provide proper iterations to make the final product.  

During training, emphasize collaborative frameworks. Include customer use cases in live training to highlight how customers can collaborate on the final product. 

You should focus on creating a collaborative and user-focused environment. The first step is to reorganize your team dynamics to create opportunities for collaboration. Have your tech team members work together in pairs, programming, and peer testing. 

4. Hire an Agile Coach

Before hiring an agile coach, it is important to know your budget and your timeline. Coordinate live projects your tech team is working on using agile methods. An agile coach should use live examples from existing projects to make training more relevant for your team. 

There are two styles of agile coaching: push-based and pull-based. 

Pull-based coaching subconsciously engages team members to adapt principles and values by giving consistent, encouraging feedback. This method facilitates learning with minimal involvement of the coach. Push-based coaching technique is when the coach plays a direct role in imparting knowledge. 

More on teaching the Agile Methodology 

When adopting agile project management, managers should emphasize collaboration and customer engagement. They should focus on work fluidity and teamwork, on the “we” and not the “I” mentality. If properly implemented, this dynamic project management method can realize great results for a tech team. If you get it right, you stand to boast, happier, healthier, and more engaged employees overall.

KnowledgeHut

KnowledgeHut

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KnowledgeHut is an outcome-focused global ed-tech company. We help organizations and professionals unlock excellence through skills development. We offer training solutions under the people and process, data science, full-stack development, cybersecurity, future technologies and digital transformation verticals.
Website : https://www.knowledgehut.com

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