Search

11 Collaboration Tips for New Project Managers

Facing a new project for the first time as a project manager must be really intimidating. You have a lot more responsibilities than before, you need to live up to the expectations of your superiors, and you have to ensure everything is finished on time. Project management is all about the art of collaboration, and if you know how to be a team player, a mediator, and a devoted leader, you will surely execute all your projects successfully. Here are some collaboration tips that you can use if you are a project manager novice. Do not command, lead and mediate A project manager carries more responsibility than authority, which is why you cannot simply command your teammates. Your job is to manage different teams who have different tasks, and ensure that every piece of the puzzle fits. Enforcing a decision in favor of a successful project, and seeing to it that everyone is on board is what you have to do. Visible organization It is better for everyone to have an insight into the entire project for the sake of better comprehension. Everyone should know their role, and make efforts to deliver their part in sync with other teams. It would be ideal to have a means of online collaboration so that everyone can be contacted more easily, and also to have a place where anyone can use project documentation. Use project management tools If you want to have quality collaboration online, then you should use project management software. There are numerous easy to use project management tools, and you can select one with features beneficial for your line of work. Make sure to go with a cloud based solution. Using best project management software, you can distribute tasks, create project milestones, have a place to brainstorm with co-workers, and safe storage for data. Bear in mind that not all of the tools are user-friendly, so it is wise to go with a free trial and see if your teammates can use the software with ease. Communicate If your project is to be successful, then you must have unobstructed communication with everyone involved in the project. It is imperative that employees understand their role, task, and what is expected from them. Do not assume that everyone knows what they need to do. You have to check up on each project’s progress in order to make sure. Check if everything is going as planned, and if a team has encountered some difficulties, in other words, if there is going to be any unforeseen delays, you can act accordingly. Have backup plans Good collaboration requires you to stay composed and to be prepared if things do not go as planned. So, for the sake of success, you should have backup plans and explain them to everyone so that employees know what to do in case of an emergency. They should know who to contact someone for clarification, where to go if the office is closed for one reason or another, how to work if they can’t come to work, etc. Also, make a backup file for all your documents, and have one on the hard drive and one uploaded online so that only you or a few others can access it. Stay within the project scope You are going to encounter far less problems if you have a well-defined project scope and if you stick to it. You need to go through the project plan with everyone, and state exactly what you as a team will do, and also what you won’t do. Give everyone time to think and, once the project starts, there should be no alterations, because every change triggers a consequence, and you might not meet the designated deadline, or have enough budget for project completion, etc. Altruism It is important to remember that you are not the employer in this situation, and that your co-workers, might have more experience or a better insight into certain matters than you. It is crucial that you hear everyone out, and accept constructive suggestions. Remember that you are there to manage and oversee, but all of you need to collaborate and work things out together. Motivate your team During long projects, it is really important that you maintain the same level of productivity, and this will become more difficult as employees get more tired. You need to inspire a sense of achievement, even if the project is not fully complete. Divide the project into a meaningful milestones, and after each one of them is reached, organize a small celebration. Manage stakeholders It is important to mention that you should not only collaborate with your co-workers but also with project stakeholders. Anyone who has an impact or who is influenced by the project’s outcome is a stakeholder, and you need to communicate with them as well. Learn how to read people As a project manager, you will have to become more empathetic. Despite the fact that people try to keep things professional, sometimes, their personal problems will interfere with their performance at work. Moreover, employees might have an argument at work, and the room will be filled with tension. You should make an effort to resolve these disputes and to effectively identify them, in order to prevent anyone from harboring any ill-will towards you or their co-workers. Identify key roles on the project In order to effectively maintain the organisation levels, you should identify the so called key players. Pick the most experienced employee from each team that should oversee the project for their part and tell them to notify you in case anything is not going as planned. They should represent their team, and negotiate in their name during the planning phases and during the project briefing process. These were some of the collaborating tips that you should not shy away from implementing as a new project manager. It may seem like a lot, but gradually, you will adapt and all of this will come natural.

11 Collaboration Tips for New Project Managers

8K
11 Collaboration Tips for New Project Managers

Facing a new project for the first time as a project manager must be really intimidating. You have a lot more responsibilities than before, you need to live up to the expectations of your superiors, and you have to ensure everything is finished on time.

Project management is all about the art of collaboration, and if you know how to be a team player, a mediator, and a devoted leader, you will surely execute all your projects successfully. Here are some collaboration tips that you can use if you are a project manager novice.

Do not command, lead and mediate

A project manager carries more responsibility than authority, which is why you cannot simply command your teammates. Your job is to manage different teams who have different tasks, and ensure that every piece of the puzzle fits. Enforcing a decision in favor of a successful project, and seeing to it that everyone is on board is what you have to do.

Visible organization

It is better for everyone to have an insight into the entire project for the sake of better comprehension. Everyone should know their role, and make efforts to deliver their part in sync with other teams. It would be ideal to have a means of online collaboration so that everyone can be contacted more easily, and also to have a place where anyone can use project documentation.

Use project management tools

If you want to have quality collaboration online, then you should use project management software. There are numerous easy to use project management tools, and you can select one with features beneficial for your line of work. Make sure to go with a cloud based solution.

Using best project management software, you can distribute tasks, create project milestones, have a place to brainstorm with co-workers, and safe storage for data. Bear in mind that not all of the tools are user-friendly, so it is wise to go with a free trial and see if your teammates can use the software with ease.

Communicate

If your project is to be successful, then you must have unobstructed communication with everyone involved in the project. It is imperative that employees understand their role, task, and what is expected from them.

Do not assume that everyone knows what they need to do. You have to check up on each project’s progress in order to make sure. Check if everything is going as planned, and if a team has encountered some difficulties, in other words, if there is going to be any unforeseen delays, you can act accordingly.

Have backup plans

Good collaboration requires you to stay composed and to be prepared if things do not go as planned. So, for the sake of success, you should have backup plans and explain them to everyone so that employees know what to do in case of an emergency.

They should know who to contact someone for clarification, where to go if the office is closed for one reason or another, how to work if they can’t come to work, etc. Also, make a backup file for all your documents, and have one on the hard drive and one uploaded online so that only you or a few others can access it.

Stay within the project scope

You are going to encounter far less problems if you have a well-defined project scope and if you stick to it. You need to go through the project plan with everyone, and state exactly what you as a team will do, and also what you won’t do.

Give everyone time to think and, once the project starts, there should be no alterations, because every change triggers a consequence, and you might not meet the designated deadline, or have enough budget for project completion, etc.

Altruism

It is important to remember that you are not the employer in this situation, and that your co-workers, might have more experience or a better insight into certain matters than you. It is crucial that you hear everyone out, and accept constructive suggestions. Remember that you are there to manage and oversee, but all of you need to collaborate and work things out together.

Motivate your team

During long projects, it is really important that you maintain the same level of productivity, and this will become more difficult as employees get more tired. You need to inspire a sense of achievement, even if the project is not fully complete. Divide the project into a meaningful milestones, and after each one of them is reached, organize a small celebration.

Manage stakeholders

It is important to mention that you should not only collaborate with your co-workers but also with project stakeholders. Anyone who has an impact or who is influenced by the project’s outcome is a stakeholder, and you need to communicate with them as well.

Learn how to read people

As a project manager, you will have to become more empathetic. Despite the fact that people try to keep things professional, sometimes, their personal problems will interfere with their performance at work.

Moreover, employees might have an argument at work, and the room will be filled with tension. You should make an effort to resolve these disputes and to effectively identify them, in order to prevent anyone from harboring any ill-will towards you or their co-workers.

Identify key roles on the project

In order to effectively maintain the organisation levels, you should identify the so called key players. Pick the most experienced employee from each team that should oversee the project for their part and tell them to notify you in case anything is not going as planned. They should represent their team, and negotiate in their name during the planning phases and during the project briefing process.

These were some of the collaborating tips that you should not shy away from implementing as a new project manager. It may seem like a lot, but gradually, you will adapt and all of this will come natural.

Jason

Jason Grills

Blog Author

Jason Grills is an ed-tech enthusiast with a passion for writing on emerging technologies in the areas of corporate training and education. With hands-on experience in working with ProProfs learning management system and other eLearning authoring tools, Jason has an exclusive insight into the eLearning industry.
 

Join the Discussion

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Suggested Blogs

The PMP® Exam Blueprint For 2019

Preparing for your PMP® exam might seem like a struggle, but the end result is quite rewarding. From the initial application process, you need to go through a lengthy procedure to become a PMP® certified professional. The PMP® exam tests the professionals on the five project management processes: Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing.  It is also important for the candidates to have a thorough understanding of the nine knowledge areas under project management, which includes integration management, project scope management, time management, project resource management plan, procurement management, cost management, and time management.The PMP® certification is a validation of a professional’s experience in project management and is offered by the Project Management Institute (PMI) to those candidates who qualify the PMP® examination.The process of preparation can be quite challenging for a candidate who is preparing for a PMP® certification. This article discusses the details of the PMP® exam, giving an insight into the prerequisites, layout of the exam and some tips on how to ace the exam the first time.PMP® Examination FormatThe PMP® examination contains a total of 200 multiple-choice questions. Out of these 200 questions, 25 questions are ‘unscored questions’, that is, they do not affect the exam score. These questions act as an effective and admissible way to test the validity of future examination questions. The questions are placed and are asked randomly throughout the examination. It is very important to keep in mind that the unscored questions cannot be distinguished from the scored questions. Hence it is important that all the questions are answered with the same level of precision.No. of Scored QuestionsNo. of Unscored QuestionsTotal number of Questions17525200The standard method of PMI  examination is Center-based Testing (CBT). While paper-based Testing is also available, but only under limited circumstances.The allotted time duration for completion of the exam is 4 hours. There aren’t any scheduled breaks during the examination, though a small break can be taken if needed. If any break is taken during the exam, the exam clock time does not stop but continues to count down.Before you begin taking the exam, you will be shown a tutorial explaining the process of the exam. It’s recommended to go through this video that takes around 15 minutes. Further, your PMP® exam will be followed by a survey. The time for both excludes the four hours of the examination during which you need to answer 200 questions.Allotted time for the Examination4 hoursNew PBT Policy effective from 1 July 2017The Paper-based testing for the PMP® examination is available under limited circumstances. The instances are listed as follows:Distance to a Prometric CBT (Centre-based testing)  site exceeds 240 km (150 miles)A Prometric CBT site isn’t available in the country of residence and travelling across borders is prohibited/burdensome.As of 01 July 2017, the price for PBT exam has been changed, which now equals the CBT prices.NOTE: It should be indicated during the certification payment process if the candidate will be opting for a centre-based or a paper-based examination. In the case of PBT examination, the site location, date and group testing number on the application should be included as well.How are the PMP® examination questions developed?The questions which are asked in the PMP® examination are:Developed in accordance with the standards of  IOC/IEC 17024Developed and are validated independently by global work groups of PMP® certification holders.Monitored via psychometric analysisAccording to the specifications made in the PMP® Examination Content Outline.Referenced to the present project management titles, which include but not limited to PMI ’s global standards.Are any language aids provided for the PMP® examination?PMI  examinations are administered in English. However, for the questions and answers of the PMP® examinations, language aids are provided with no additional costs.Language Aids are available in 14 languages, which are stated as follows:ArabicHebrewBrazilian PortugueseItalianChinese (Simplified)Chinese (Traditional)JapaneseKoreanFrenchRussianGermanSpanishPolishTurkishThe language aids are provided when the examination is being administered. They are protected under the PMI  Test Security and Confidentiality rules.NOTE: If a language aid is required, it should be indicated as a part of the payment process, that is, while submitting the application online; or as a part of the application process, if a paper application is being submitted.The post-exam survey and pre-exam tutorial are administered only in the English language. The language aid is provided only for the PMP® examination questions and answers.What is the Blueprint of the PMP® Examination?The PMP® examination blueprint, which is depicted in the table below defines the proportion of questions which are asked from each domain. These percentages determine the number of questions that will appear in the examination, covering all the domains and process groups of the project management. The following is the blueprint:Blueprint of the PMP® ExamDomainPercentage of QuestionsInitiation13%Planning24%Execution31%Monitoring and Controlling25%Closing7%TOTAL100%Further, let’s discuss the domains, tasks, knowledge and skill statements which are defined by the Role Delineation Study. There are multiple tasks under each domain which are measured through the process of PMP® certification.Domain I, Initiating - 13%Task 1: Carry out a project assessment based on the available information, meetings with stakeholders, and the lessons which are learned from the previous projects.Task 2: Figure out the key deliverables to direct the achievement of project goals and manage customer expectations based on the business requirements.Task 3: Use appropriate tools and techniques to perform stakeholder analysis so that expectations can be aligned and support can be gained for the project.Task 4: Recognise high-level risks, constraints, and assumptions based on the historical data, current environment, organisational factors, and expert judgement, so that an implementation strategy can be proposed.Task 5: Engage in the process of development of project charter by compiling and analyzing the gathered information so that it is ensured that the project stakeholders agree on its elements.Task 6: Acquire the project charter approval from the sponsor, so that the authority assigned to the project manager can be assigned, while at the same time commitment and acceptance can be gained.Task 7: Perform benefit analysis with relevant stakeholders so that the project alignment with organizational strategy can be validated.Task 8: Ensure that there is a common understanding of the key deliverables, milestones, as well as their roles and responsibilities by informing the stakeholders of the approved project charter.Knowledge and SkillsAnalytical skillsBenefit analysis techniquesElements of a project charterEstimation tools and techniquesStrategic managementDomain II, Planning - 24%Task 1: Based on the project charter and lessons learned, review and assess the project requirements, constraints and assumptions with the stakeholders.Task 2: Based on the approved project scope and using scope management techniques, develop scope management so that the scope of the project can be defined, maintained and managed.Task 3: Based on the project scope, resources, schedule, approved project charter, and other information, plan the cost management using estimating techniques so that the project costs can be managed.Task 4: Based on the approved project deliverables and milestones, scope, and resource management plans, develop the project schedule so that a scheduled completion of the project can be managed.Task 5: Come up with a Project Resource Management plan where the roles and responsibilities of the project team members can be defined so that a project organizational structure can be created and guidance can be formed regarding how resources will be managed and assigned.Task 6: Work on a communication management plan which will be based on the project organizational structure and stakeholder requirements, so that the flow of project information can be defined and managed.Task 7: Based on the project scope, budget, and schedule, create a procurement management plan. This ensures that the required project resources will be available.Task 8: To prevent the occurrence of defects while at the same time control the cost of quality, come up with a quality management plan to define the quality standards for the project and its products which will be based on the project scope, risks, and requirements.Task 9: Work on change management so that the changes can be managed and tracked.Task 10: Develop a risk management plan. Identify, analyse and prioritize the project risk; create a risk register, and define risk response strategy to do so. This way, the uncertainty and opportunity throughout the project life cycle can be managed.Task 11: Present the project management plan to the relevant stakeholders in accordance with the applicable policies and procedures, so the approval to proceed with the project execution can be attained.Task 12: Conduct kick-off meeting, communicate the start of the project, and other relevant information to engage stakeholders and gain commitment.Task 13: Develop a stakeholder management plan after analyzing the needs and potential impact so that the stakeholders’ expectations can be managed and can be engaged in project decisions.Knowledge and SkillsChange management planningCommunications planningEstimation tools and techniquesLean and efficiency principlesQuality management planningRegulatory and environmental impacts assessment planningScope deconstruction (e.g., WBS, Scope backlog) tools and techniquesStakeholder management planningWorkflow diagramming techniquesCost management planning, including project budgeting tools and techniquesContract types and selection criteriaHuman resource planningProcurement planningRequirements gathering techniquesRisk management planningScope management planningTime management planning, including scheduling tools and techniquesDOMAIN III, Executing - 31%Task 1: Follow the human resource and procurement management plans by obtaining and managing the project resources so that the project requirements can be met.Task 2: Lean and develop the project team to manage the task execution based on the project management plan so that the project deliverables can be achieved.Task 3: Use appropriate tools and techniques to implement a quality management plan. This is done to ensure that the work is being performed as per the required quality standards.Task 4: Follow the change management plan to implement the approved changes and corrective actions so that the project requirements can be met.Task 5: Follow the risk management plan to implement the approved actions so that the impact of risks can be minimized while at the same time, the advantage of opportunities on the project can be attained. ‘Task 6: Follow the communication plan and manage the flow of information so that the stakeholders are kept engaged and informed.Task 7: Follow the stakeholder management plan to maintain the stakeholder relationship so that continued support can be received and expectations can be managed.Knowledge and SkillsContinuous improvement processesElements of a statement of workProject budgeting tools and techniquesVendor management techniquesContract management techniquesInterdependencies among project elementsQuality standard toolsDomain IV, Monitoring and Controlling - 25%Task 1: Use appropriate tools and techniques to measure the project performance so that any variance and corrective actions can be identified and quantified.Task 2: Follow the change in the management plan and manage changes to the project so that the project goal remains aligned with the business needs.Task 3: Use appropriate tools and techniques to meet project requirements and business needs in order to verify that the project deliverables conform to the quality standards which has been established in the quality management plan.Task 4: Monitor and assess the risk to determine if exposure has changed and evaluated the effectiveness of response strategies so that the impact of risks and opportunities on the project can be managed.Task 5: Review and update the issue log as well as determine corrective measures by using appropriate tools and techniques so that the impact on the project can be minimized.Task 6: Use lessons learned management techniques to capture, analyze, and manage the lessons learned so that continuous improvement can be attained.Task 7: According to the procurement plan, monitor the procurement activities so that the compliance with project activities can be verified.Knowledge and SkillsPerformance measurement and tracking techniquesProject control limitsProject monitoring tools and techniquesQuality measurement toolsRisk response techniquesProcess analysis techniquesProject finance principlesProject quality best practices and standardsRisk identification and analysis techniquesQuality validation and verification techniquesDomain V, Closing - 7%Task I: Collect the final acceptance of the project deliverables from the relevant stakeholders as confirmation that the project scope and deliverables were achieved.Task II: According to the project plan, transfer the ownership of deliverables to the assigned stakeholders so that the project closure can be facilitated.Task III: Obtain financial, legal and administrative closure via the accepted practices and policies so that a formal closure of the project can be attained and a transfer of liability can be ensured.Task IV: According to the communications management plan, prepare and share the final project report so that the project performance can be documented and conveyed as well as project evaluation can be assisted.Task V: Collect and combine the lessons that were learned throughout the project and conduct a project review so that the organization’s knowledge base can be updated.Task VI: Archive the materials and project documents by making use of the generally accepted practices so that statutory requirements can be complied with and for potential use in future projects and audits.Task VII: Use appropriate tools and techniques to get feedback from relevant stakeholders so that their satisfaction can be evaluated.Knowledge and SkillsArchiving practices and statutesContract closure requirementsFeedback techniquesProject review techniquesActive listeningBenefits realizationBusiness acumenCoaching, mentoring, training, and motivational techniquesConfiguration managementCustomer satisfaction metricsDecision makingDiversity and cultural sensitivityExpert judgment techniqueGenerational sensitivity and diversityInterpersonal skillsLeadership tools, techniques, and skillsMeeting management techniquesOrganizational and operational awarenessPresentation tools and techniquesProblem-solving tools and techniquesQuality assurance and control techniquesRisk assessment techniquesStakeholder management techniquesVirtual/remote team managementCompliance (statute/organization)Close-out proceduresPerformance measurement techniquesTransition planning techniqueApplicable laws and regulationsBrainstorming techniquesChange management techniquesCommunication channels, tools, techniques, and methodsConflict resolutionData gathering techniquesDelegation techniquesEmotional intelligenceFacilitationInformation management tools, techniques, and methodsKnowledge managementLessons learned management techniquesNegotiating and influencing techniques and skillsPeer-review processesPrioritization/time managementProject finance principlesRelationship managementSituational awarenessTeam-building techniquesTips for passing and preparing for PMP® ExamPMP® exam requires a lot of dedication and efforts in order to clear it at one go. The following tips will surely help you to prepare and pass your PMP® exam:Memorise all formulas to easily answer the math questions.Spend around 4 hours to practice full sample exams at one sitting.On the day of your exam, use your time effectively to answer 200 questions within 4 hours. You will have 1 minute to answer each question.Answer all questions, do not leave any question blank.Use the process of elimination for obviously incorrect answer options to maximise probability in case you are not sure about the correct answer.Avoid spending too much time on any single question. If you are spending more than 2 minutes on a single question then you can make your best guess for the answer and mark it for review at the end of the exam.Try to reserve the last 10 minutes to review the marked questions.Read all the answer options before selecting an answer.Keep in mind that some questions may provide hints to other questions in the exam.Wear comfortable cloth and footwear on the day of your exam.To wrap it up!The PMP® certification acts as a validation of a professional’s experience in project management and is a challenging process as well. Start preparing well for the five domains (Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing) in advance so that you can ace the examination and get nearer to achieving your dream career. All the best!
10093
The PMP® Exam Blueprint For 2019

Preparing for your PMP® exam might seem like a st... Read More

Upcoming Changes to the PMP Examination in 2019

Introduction In order to keep its project management content relevant and in line with current practices, the Project Management Institute (PMI) issues new editions of its ‘Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide)’.  The latest version of the PMBOK Guide, the sixth edition, is due to be released in September 2017.  As a result, the PMP examination will also see some changes from the first quarter of 2018,to ensure consistency with the updated guide. Major Changes Major changes include: Renaming of knowledge areas Project Human Resource Management to Project Resource Management Project Time Management to Project Schedule Management Addition of a new chapter The Role of the Project Manager will be added to detail various aspects of the project manager’s responsibilities Deletion of processes The Close Procurements process will be deleted and related functionality incorporated into the Close Project or Phase process Addition of new processes Three new processes would be added Manage Project Knowledge Control Resources Implement Risk Responses Renaming of processes Multiple processes would be renamed with the number of processes increasing from 47 to 49 Restructuring of Knowledge Areas Four new sections have been added Key Concepts Trends and Emerging Practices Tailoring Considerations Considerations for Agile/Adaptive Environments Changes in orientation and emphasis The Guide takes on a more advisory note rather than a mandatory tone and emphasizes the role of the project manager in choosing appropriate processes depending on the nature of the project.  Timing of Exam Changeover The exact date of the examination changeover to the one based on the Sixth edition, has not yet been published by PMI.  However, if you plan to take the PMP examination prior to Q1 2018, then the current version of the exam- based on the Fifth edition, will apply.
Upcoming Changes to the PMP Examination in 2019

Introduction In order to keep its project managem... Read More

Top PMP Certification Courses in High Demand in 2017

Compared to the last 5 years, this year, successful strategic initiativesare helping more projects match up with their goals and business intent. They are reaching their completion within the desired timelines and budgets. The overall project success rate is on the rise in 2017, but on an average, in terms of wastage, organizations are losing to the extent of US$97 million for every investment of US$1 billion. According to the Pulse of the Profession 2017 Report released by PMI (Project Management Institute), this is 20 percent less than last year’s findings. Given this scenario, project managers with proper training of industry best practices are becoming more important for businesses. Here we have a list of top 10 PMP certification courses that are adding value and honing the skills of project managers in 2017. Best rated project management certificationmodules in 2017 Project Management Professional (PMP)® PMP tops the list of project management certifications by PMI. Acknowledged and in demand by organizations across the world, it validates one’s competence to take up the responsibilities of a project manager, lead and direct projects and/ or teams, and understand project management methodology. With computer based exam costs ranging from $405 – $555 for PMI members and non-members respectively, the PMP certification is worth a look. Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)® CAPM helps distinguish project managers in the job market, enhances their credibility, and works on their effectiveness of handling projects and teams. With 1.57 million new jobs in the offing through 2020, qualified CAPM practitioners will be in high demand. CAPM Certification costs $225 for PMI members and $300 for non-PMI members. CompTIA Project+ CompTIA Project+ certifies the skills and knowledge of IT and non-IT project management professionals alike. It validates their skills to initiate, implement, manage and support projects or business initiatives. Project+ certifies project management experiences and costs $285 for the complete course. Certified Scrum Master Courses Certified ScrumMaster® training provides in-depth understanding of self-management, iterative development and the visibility needed for greater project success. Scrum Methodology enables certified project managers to deliver usable software across the project’s lifecycle and facilitates project processes. The cost of attaining Scrum Master Certification ranges between $995 and $1395. Prince 2 Foundation / Prince 2 Practitioner PRINCE2 2017 Foundation and Practitioner certification programs offer comprehensive knowledge for the successful management of PRINCE2 projects. PRINCE2 provides benchmarked project management standards and uses common systems, language and procedures. Owning certification in Prince2 shows that a project manager is capable of handling risks and controlling resources, regardless of the company size, industry, project size or methods in use. This certification can be attained at a cost of $200 for the Foundation program and $340 for Practitioner courses. CPMP – Certified Project Management Practitioner The Certified Project Management Practitioner course focuses on enabling management professionals with skills in directing and leading project teams. It teaches the nuances of delivering successful project results in the face of schedule, budget and other constraints. The comprehensive training module offers demonstrated knowledge to incorporate different project management scenarios and provides necessary hands-on experiences of different management tools techniques and tools for completing complex projects efficiently. Aspirants need to pay $199 for obtaining their exam vouchers. GAQM / APM – Global Association for Quality Management / Associate in Project Management GAQM serves as the administrative body for APM and a series of other project management certifications and programs. It provides credentials for project management and other IT programs. The project management certifications by GAQM focus on providing wide knowledge base, clear direction and effective communication. They lay further emphasis on effective resource allocation, adaptability to change, and quality delivery assurances at minimal risks. The costs of obtaining this certification for entry level managers is $300. MPM – Master Project Manager Certification This certification and its necessary training is delivered in a crisp, collaborative format for experienced project management professionals or those desirous of enhancing their project management knowledge. It focuses on different project management principles, industry skills and best practices to explain the contextual framework for successful leadership and project management. Candidates aspiring for the MPM certification are required to pay $300 for application, review, processing, initiation and certification. CPM – Certified Project Manager Course CPM is a globally recognized project management certification that lays focus on skills like finance, integration, communications, marketing management, information technology, risk and issue management, HR management, quality management, etc. It combines experiential-based project management training and performance-based certification modules. The costs incurred in gaining this certification include $370 as certification fee, $70 annual fee and $70 annual renewal fee. PPM – Professional in Project Management The Professional in Project Management (PPM)™ certification program comprises of different project management modules that include – how to plan projects, execute and control processes, and complete project deliveries in time. It lays stress on the understanding of key trends in project management and demands. This certification is useful for understanding project schedules, developing project measures and learning the approaches to project control. Once certified, project managers would know how to develop, motivate and lead project teams. The PPM certification costs $300 to aspirants. Why opt for Project Management Certification? Project management credentials open up new horizons for project managers by expanding their market reach and specific industry skills. They showcase an individual’s ability to take up challenging projects, get an increase in salary and earn critical projects. These certifications aptly demonstrate project management experience and competency in leading projects – of all sizes and types.    
Top PMP Certification Courses in High Demand in 20...

Compared to the last 5 years, this year, successfu... Read More

Useful links