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7 Communication Secrets Of Great Project Managers

In order to be a great leader and project manager, you must be able to communicate effectively with your team. Dealing with employees isn’t rocket science, yet it’s far away from being a simple task. However, successful leaders understood that in order to reach their full leadership potential, their team must always understand the company’s purpose. Moreover, each employee should have a positive rapport with his or her project manager. If you want to lead your team towards great achievements, you need to establish an individual rapport with your employees. PMP course is a great certification and carries with it a high level of prestige within the project management and Information Technology (IT) community. You can do so by leveraging your communication skills up to the point where the employee truly understands your expectations. In today’s post, we’re discussing 7 communication “secrets” that great project managers implement on a consistent basis in order to build rapport and improve their employees’ standards, motivation, trust, and performance. 1.     They Truly Know and Understand Their Employees In order to communicate effectively with a person, you must understand how that person thinks. You can do so by directly interacting and asking questions such as: What are your biggest motivations? What are your problems? What are your needs? What are your expectations? You can go on with more questions until you figure out the employee even more. Another option would be assessing their performance and their biggest struggles. Look for indirect clues that are reflected from your employee’s performance. 2.     They Establish Trust Before Anything Else Trust is a very important factor that needs to be present in every company. There are more levels of trust that need to be taken care of, yet there’s one that you should focus your efforts primarily. You must establish trust before leading any sort of team. Just like when there’s no love when there’s no respect, it’s the same with the workplace. People only follow people that they fully trust. Want to improve your communication? Be trustworthy and impose respect! 3.     They Never Take Things Personal Taking things personally is never going to help you become a great project manager. Employees say a lot of things. They have a lot of remarks, and they’re mostly directed towards the leadership positions (you). When your employees are dissatisfied with your performance or they’re directly blaming you for bad results, never take it personally. Understand where their frustration is coming from, and approach the situation lightly. That means that you should first find the reasons for which your employees have said those things, and go straight for the solutions. Project managers that hold grudges should never be project managers! 4.     They Actually Know How to Listen Listening – such a rare trait nowadays. Everyone’s trying to impose their own opinion on the matter without even assessing the opinions of others. Great project managers are also great listeners. They understand that in order to offer the best solutions for their employees’ problems, they need to understand their employees’ mindset and issues. Once you begin listening to someone without allowing any counter argumentations to pop into your head, you’ll start “getting more” out of every conversation. Learn how to actively listen to your team and reap the benefits of a better communication and a better rapport. 5.     They Are Open-Minded Open-minded project managers seem to achieve more things in less time. The reason is quite simple: instead of only counting their ideas and solutions, they’re allowing their team to actively participate in this process. Listening to your employees’ insights and putting them through your “filter” is the best practice you can adopt if you wish a faster progress. You might be surprised that some of your employees’ ideas are better than yours. Their solutions might represent a better choice your organization’s long-term success, so staying close-minded is only going to sabotage your company’s potential. 6.     They Talk About Solutions Instead of Problems Do you want to solve a problem or just complain about it? A project manager’s role is to manage the well-being of the project. When problems kick in, some managers jump straight to complaints. They summon the employee that has done something wrong, and they’re putting the emphasis on the problems that caused the happening. Well, great project leaders are doing it differently. Instead of initiating a conversation about the issue that produced the damage, they’re taking the time to find solutions for the problem. They mostly provide solutions instead of putting more salt on the wound. 7.     They Are Motivated and Energetic In order to motivate your team to be more productive and efficient, you need to lead by example. You can’t expect people to follow you if you’re always pessimistic, lazy, and comfortable. Instead, you must present yourself in quite the opposite way. You want to create the feeling that you’ve always got it, that you’re struggling to get better, and that you truly care about the company’s purpose. The traits you’ll manifest will definitely have an impact on your employee’s mentality. Give them something good to imitate, and you’ll obtain something good out of them! Conclusion Your business performance is heavily influenced by your employees’ performance. Your employees’ productivity can be improved through various actions. Follow the insights and principles you’ve learned in this article and see where that leads you. Remember: knowledge without implementation doesn’t lead to results. Therefore, ensure that you’re making small moves towards improving your communication ways and your team’s potential.

7 Communication Secrets Of Great Project Managers

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7 Communication Secrets Of Great Project Managers

In order to be a great leader and project manager, you must be able to communicate effectively with your team. Dealing with employees isn’t rocket science, yet it’s far away from being a simple task. However, successful leaders understood that in order to reach their full leadership potential, their team must always understand the company’s purpose.

Moreover, each employee should have a positive rapport with his or her project manager. If you want to lead your team towards great achievements, you need to establish an individual rapport with your employees. PMP course is a great certification and carries with it a high level of prestige within the project management and Information Technology (IT) community. You can do so by leveraging your communication skills up to the point where the employee truly understands your expectations.

In today’s post, we’re discussing 7 communication “secrets” that great project managers implement on a consistent basis in order to build rapport and improve their employees’ standards, motivation, trust, and performance.

1.     They Truly Know and Understand Their Employees

In order to communicate effectively with a person, you must understand how that person thinks. You can do so by directly interacting and asking questions such as:

  1. What are your biggest motivations?
  2. What are your problems?
  3. What are your needs?
  4. What are your expectations?

You can go on with more questions until you figure out the employee even more. Another option would be assessing their performance and their biggest struggles. Look for indirect clues that are reflected from your employee’s performance.

2.     They Establish Trust Before Anything Else

Trust is a very important factor that needs to be present in every company. There are more levels of trust that need to be taken care of, yet there’s one that you should focus your efforts primarily.

You must establish trust before leading any sort of team. Just like when there’s no love when there’s no respect, it’s the same with the workplace. People only follow people that they fully trust. Want to improve your communication? Be trustworthy and impose respect!

3.     They Never Take Things Personal

Taking things personally is never going to help you become a great project manager. Employees say a lot of things. They have a lot of remarks, and they’re mostly directed towards the leadership positions (you).

When your employees are dissatisfied with your performance or they’re directly blaming you for bad results, never take it personally. Understand where their frustration is coming from, and approach the situation lightly. That means that you should first find the reasons for which your employees have said those things, and go straight for the solutions. Project managers that hold grudges should never be project managers!

4.     They Actually Know How to Listen

Listening – such a rare trait nowadays. Everyone’s trying to impose their own opinion on the matter without even assessing the opinions of others. Great project managers are also great listeners. They understand that in order to offer the best solutions for their employees’ problems, they need to understand their employees’ mindset and issues.

Once you begin listening to someone without allowing any counter argumentations to pop into your head, you’ll start “getting more” out of every conversation. Learn how to actively listen to your team and reap the benefits of a better communication and a better rapport.

5.     They Are Open-Minded

Open-minded project managers seem to achieve more things in less time. The reason is quite simple: instead of only counting their ideas and solutions, they’re allowing their team to actively participate in this process. Listening to your employees’ insights and putting them through your “filter” is the best practice you can adopt if you wish a faster progress.

You might be surprised that some of your employees’ ideas are better than yours. Their solutions might represent a better choice your organization’s long-term success, so staying close-minded is only going to sabotage your company’s potential.

6.     They Talk About Solutions Instead of Problems

Do you want to solve a problem or just complain about it? A project manager’s role is to manage the well-being of the project. When problems kick in, some managers jump straight to complaints. They summon the employee that has done something wrong, and they’re putting the emphasis on the problems that caused the happening.

Well, great project leaders are doing it differently. Instead of initiating a conversation about the issue that produced the damage, they’re taking the time to find solutions for the problem. They mostly provide solutions instead of putting more salt on the wound.

7.     They Are Motivated and Energetic

In order to motivate your team to be more productive and efficient, you need to lead by example. You can’t expect people to follow you if you’re always pessimistic, lazy, and comfortable. Instead, you must present yourself in quite the opposite way.

You want to create the feeling that you’ve always got it, that you’re struggling to get better, and that you truly care about the company’s purpose. The traits you’ll manifest will definitely have an impact on your employee’s mentality. Give them something good to imitate, and you’ll obtain something good out of them!

Conclusion

Your business performance is heavily influenced by your employees’ performance. Your employees’ productivity can be improved through various actions. Follow the insights and principles you’ve learned in this article and see where that leads you.

Remember: knowledge without implementation doesn’t lead to results. Therefore, ensure that you’re making small moves towards improving your communication ways and your team’s potential.

Eva

Eva Wislow

Blog Author

Eva Wislow is a Career Advisor and HR Manager at <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.careersbooster.com" />CareersBooster.com</a> resumes writing service. She is focusing on helping people break down their limits, find a dream job and achieve life and career success. Follow Eva on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://twitter.com/EvaWislow" />Twitter</a>.

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CAPM or PMP: Which Is Better?

Project Management is one of the fastest-growing professions around the world. Earning a project management certificate is not only a great way to build skills, position yourself as a valuable asset in your organization, and earn a bigger cheque, but also a great way to stay ahead of your peers. Two popular and in-demand certification options are the Project Management Professional (PMP) Certification and the Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) Certification. Both of these certifications are offered by Project Management Institute (PMI) and understanding the difference between these two certifications is critical to decide and choose the right course that fits your career goals.  In this blog, we will look into the differences between PMP and CAPM certification, including cost, difficulty levels, prerequisites, and industry demand; so, you can make an informed decision to fast-track your career towards success.CAPM vs PMP Certification: Which is Right for You?Before figuring out which course is right for you, let us start by understanding the differences. In simple terms, CAPM is considered as the beginner-level certification compared to PMP, which is a professional level course. Hence, the prerequisites required for CAPM are much lesser than PMP and the exam for CAPM is considered to be easier and less expensive as well. Having said that, PMP certification is better known, more prestigious, and highly likely to earn you a bigger paycheque.  The Certified Associate Project Management (CAPM)® will help you stand out from your competitors and enhance your effectiveness and credibility while working on different projects. On the other hand, the Project Management Professional (PMP) certification course is a qualification that is recognized industry wide. Becoming a PMP will enhance your work methodologies in any industry, regardless of the complexity of the projects being handled. This course covers a wide range of techniques and tools necessary in project management. 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Let us look into each one of them.  If you wish to acquire a CAPM certification, you should know that it will enhance your efficiency and is recognized to distinguish you from the others in the industry. 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Preparing for your PMP® exam might seem like a struggle, but the end result is quite rewarding. From the initial application process, you need to go through a lengthy procedure to become a PMP® certified professional. The PMP® exam tests the professionals on the five project management processes: Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing.  It is also important for the candidates to have a thorough understanding of the nine knowledge areas under project management, which includes integration management, project scope management, time management, project resource management plan, procurement management, cost management, and time management.The PMP® certification is a validation of a professional’s experience in project management and is offered by the Project Management Institute (PMI) to those candidates who qualify the PMP® examination.The process of preparation can be quite challenging for a candidate who is preparing for a PMP certification. 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This way, the uncertainty and opportunity throughout the project life cycle can be managed.Task 11: Present the project management plan to the relevant stakeholders in accordance with the applicable policies and procedures, so the approval to proceed with the project execution can be attained.Task 12: Conduct kick-off meeting, communicate the start of the project, and other relevant information to engage stakeholders and gain commitment.Task 13: Develop a stakeholder management plan after analyzing the needs and potential impact so that the stakeholders’ expectations can be managed and can be engaged in project decisions.Knowledge and SkillsChange management planningCommunications planningEstimation tools and techniquesLean and efficiency principlesQuality management planningRegulatory and environmental impacts assessment planningScope deconstruction (e.g., WBS, Scope backlog) tools and techniquesStakeholder management planningWorkflow diagramming techniquesCost management planning, including project budgeting tools and techniquesContract types and selection criteriaHuman resource planningProcurement planningRequirements gathering techniquesRisk management planningScope management planningTime management planning, including scheduling tools and techniquesDOMAIN III, Executing - 31%Task 1: Follow the human resource and procurement management plans by obtaining and managing the project resources so that the project requirements can be met.Task 2: Lean and develop the project team to manage the task execution based on the project management plan so that the project deliverables can be achieved.Task 3: Use appropriate tools and techniques to implement a quality management plan. This is done to ensure that the work is being performed as per the required quality standards.Task 4: Follow the change management plan to implement the approved changes and corrective actions so that the project requirements can be met.Task 5: Follow the risk management plan to implement the approved actions so that the impact of risks can be minimized while at the same time, the advantage of opportunities on the project can be attained. ‘Task 6: Follow the communication plan and manage the flow of information so that the stakeholders are kept engaged and informed.Task 7: Follow the stakeholder management plan to maintain the stakeholder relationship so that continued support can be received and expectations can be managed.Knowledge and SkillsContinuous improvement processesElements of a statement of workProject budgeting tools and techniquesVendor management techniquesContract management techniquesInterdependencies among project elementsQuality standard toolsDomain IV, Monitoring and Controlling - 25%Task 1: Use appropriate tools and techniques to measure the project performance so that any variance and corrective actions can be identified and quantified.Task 2: Follow the change in the management plan and manage changes to the project so that the project goal remains aligned with the business needs.Task 3: Use appropriate tools and techniques to meet project requirements and business needs in order to verify that the project deliverables conform to the quality standards which has been established in the quality management plan.Task 4: Monitor and assess the risk to determine if exposure has changed and evaluated the effectiveness of response strategies so that the impact of risks and opportunities on the project can be managed.Task 5: Review and update the issue log as well as determine corrective measures by using appropriate tools and techniques so that the impact on the project can be minimized.Task 6: Use lessons learned management techniques to capture, analyze, and manage the lessons learned so that continuous improvement can be attained.Task 7: According to the procurement plan, monitor the procurement activities so that the compliance with project activities can be verified.Knowledge and SkillsPerformance measurement and tracking techniquesProject control limitsProject monitoring tools and techniquesQuality measurement toolsRisk response techniquesProcess analysis techniquesProject finance principlesProject quality best practices and standardsRisk identification and analysis techniquesQuality validation and verification techniquesDomain V, Closing - 7%Task I: Collect the final acceptance of the project deliverables from the relevant stakeholders as confirmation that the project scope and deliverables were achieved.Task II: According to the project plan, transfer the ownership of deliverables to the assigned stakeholders so that the project closure can be facilitated.Task III: Obtain financial, legal and administrative closure via the accepted practices and policies so that a formal closure of the project can be attained and a transfer of liability can be ensured.Task IV: According to the communications management plan, prepare and share the final project report so that the project performance can be documented and conveyed as well as project evaluation can be assisted.Task V: Collect and combine the lessons that were learned throughout the project and conduct a project review so that the organization’s knowledge base can be updated.Task VI: Archive the materials and project documents by making use of the generally accepted practices so that statutory requirements can be complied with and for potential use in future projects and audits.Task VII: Use appropriate tools and techniques to get feedback from relevant stakeholders so that their satisfaction can be evaluated.Knowledge and SkillsArchiving practices and statutesContract closure requirementsFeedback techniquesProject review techniquesActive listeningBenefits realizationBusiness acumenCoaching, mentoring, training, and motivational techniquesConfiguration managementCustomer satisfaction metricsDecision makingDiversity and cultural sensitivityExpert judgment techniqueGenerational sensitivity and diversityInterpersonal skillsLeadership tools, techniques, and skillsMeeting management techniquesOrganizational and operational awarenessPresentation tools and techniquesProblem-solving tools and techniquesQuality assurance and control techniquesRisk assessment techniquesStakeholder management techniquesVirtual/remote team managementCompliance (statute/organization)Close-out proceduresPerformance measurement techniquesTransition planning techniqueApplicable laws and regulationsBrainstorming techniquesChange management techniquesCommunication channels, tools, techniques, and methodsConflict resolutionData gathering techniquesDelegation techniquesEmotional intelligenceFacilitationInformation management tools, techniques, and methodsKnowledge managementLessons learned management techniquesNegotiating and influencing techniques and skillsPeer-review processesPrioritization/time managementProject finance principlesRelationship managementSituational awarenessTeam-building techniquesTips for passing and preparing for PMP® ExamPMP® exam requires a lot of dedication and efforts in order to clear it at one go. The following tips will surely help you to prepare and pass your PMP® exam:Memorise all formulas to easily answer the math questions.Spend around 4 hours to practice full sample exams at one sitting.On the day of your exam, use your time effectively to answer 200 questions within 4 hours. You will have 1 minute to answer each question.Answer all questions, do not leave any question blank.Use the process of elimination for obviously incorrect answer options to maximise probability in case you are not sure about the correct answer.Avoid spending too much time on any single question. If you are spending more than 2 minutes on a single question then you can make your best guess for the answer and mark it for review at the end of the exam.Try to reserve the last 10 minutes to review the marked questions.Read all the answer options before selecting an answer.Keep in mind that some questions may provide hints to other questions in the exam.Wear comfortable cloth and footwear on the day of your exam.To wrap it up!The PMP® certification acts as a validation of a professional’s experience in project management and is a challenging process as well. Start preparing well for the five domains (Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing) in advance so that you can ace the examination and get nearer to achieving your dream career. All the best!
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The PMP® Exam Blueprint For 2019

Preparing for your PMP® exam might seem like a st... Read More

A Comprehensive Guide to PMP® Exam Preparation

Are you still trying to figure out a way to start preparing for your PMP® Exam? Fret not! This blog will guide you with some best practices that you should adopt while preparing for your PMP® exam. This will surely help you to successfully clear your PMP® certification exam.Every PMP certification aspirant differs from one another in terms of experience and expertise. Similarly, every person has got a unique learning habit. Therefore, you should get your own study plan which is based on your personal learning likes and needs. But this doesn’t mean that you should get worried about developing the study plan as you can find a plethora of resources to cater the needs of exam candidates, both online and offline which allows you to come up with a plan which fits your specific needs, style of learning, and individual circumstances.6 best practices for your PMP® Exam preparationUsually, most of the successful PMP® candidates spend long hours preparing for their PMP® certification exam. So, you should make sure that you have plenty of time to prepare for your PMP® exam. You can adopt the following best practices to prepare for your PMP® certification exam:1.Review the PMP® Examination Content OutlinePMP® Examination content outline is an important document which will help you to do well with your PMP® exam. You should go through this document which is published by PMI® to find the following information:Break up of questions as per the Process areasList of skills, tasks, and knowledge which are required as per PMI’s Role Delineation study.Going through this credible document will give you a high-level idea of what all get covered in the PMP® exam. You should go through this once you feel that you have attained a reasonable command on the content covered by PMBOK® Guide or any other study guide which you are referring in order to ensure that you avoid any unwanted surprises while appearing for your PMP® certification exam.2.Take up a formal study course offered by any accredited Registered Education Provider (R.E.P)Project Management Institute (PMI) has approved a few organisations to offer project management training in order to establish a global network of quality education providers to help all the Project Management Professional (PMP®) credential aspirants and credential holders.Enrolling yourself in a PMP® training course is one of the best ways to prepare for your certification exam. The reasons are as follows:These courses provide tailor-made PMP study materials and best practices for the PMP exam.They give you a quick start in getting a grasp of various project management concepts, formulae, terminology, and other key inputs which help you to prepare for your PMP exam.You can also get the 35 contact hours certificate by taking up these training courses which is necessary for you to be eligible for the PMP® exam.3.Come up with a study planYou should start treating your PMP® certification as a project and prepare a plan which covers all the activities that would help you to get PMP® certified. But the core element in this plan is to have a well-defined study plan. You should break your study sessions into smaller chunks and prepare a study plan which includes timelines to read PMBOK®, practice mock tests, study various materials etc.4.Review the latest edition of PMBOK® Guide and self-study books published by other reputable training organisationsNo matter whatever reference material you want to study in order to prepare for your PMP® certification exam, the PMPBOK® Guide is the recommended study material for all the PMP® aspirants. The page number 61 of the guide contains a table that shows the relation between 13 Knowledge Areas and 5 Process Groups with 47 processes. It further explains how these are applicable to project management.As a candidate, you should be thorough with this table and draw this table on a piece of paper in 5 minutes while appearing for your exam. The same can be used as a reference in answering the 200 exam questions. Other than the PMBOK® Guide, you can also review other study guides published by R.E.P.s and other reputable training organisations.5.Get ready for your exam by practicing Mock TestsDo you want to check the status of your PMP® certification exam preparation? You can do that by taking PMP mock tests. These can help you to map the gaps in your project management knowledge. You can take a test and review the results to find the areas that you need to work on.Focusing on answering the questions by sitting at a place for four hours is not a piece of cake. Taking full-length mock tests helps you to prepare for such a physically daunting and mentally straining process. However, it is a very important drill for your PMP® certification exam. So, it’s better to take up these mock tests and prepare well for your big day.6.Study groupStudying in a group can prove to be quite helpful while you are preparing for your PMP® certification exam. Catch up with the like-minded PMP® aspirants to know about new tactics and get benefited in other ways by being a part of the study group. Few of the benefits are as follows:Studying in a group is the best escape from the monotony of studying alone.You can surely overcome the areas which you are struggling with.Helping others will also boost your confidence.Sharing project management experiences with others help you to crack the scenario based questions which is the trickiest part of the PMP® certification exam.It further helps you to stay on course and helps you to motivate each other in the group.The biggest advantage of studying in a group is that it forces you to study on a regular basis and makes the preparation activity a part of your routine.Tips and tricks to prepare for your PMP® examYou need to study numerous materials in order to crack your PMP® certification exam. But do you have access to the right books and materials? Every person has his or her own way of learning. The following ways will surely help you to become efficient in your study and get equipped with all the knowledge that you need to crack your PMP® exam:If you have access to the workshops conducted by PMI then that would be a big benefit for you. This will also help you to receive the bundle of 35 credit hours which are necessary to qualify for your PMP® application procedure. Attending a PMP® boot camp gives you access to numerous benefits. Few of them are:1.Review everything which you need to cover on the examEverybody is oblivious about what he or she is going to encounter during the PMP® certification exam. Whatever you will find in the exam is sure to be geared from the PMBOK®. This means you should be thorough with the PMBOK® guidelines to get PMP® certified at one go. But the PMBOK® consists of only 75% of what you will see in the exam. What about the rest? You need to seek for a PMP instructor’s guidance in order to fill the gap in learning to qualify your PMP® certification exam.2.Review how to study for the examAs discussed, the PMBOK® guide is a great resource for your PMP® certification exam. At times, even if the questions are lengthy with a situational circumstance, you need to bring it down to a rule that needs to be comprehended. Further, there are certain focus areas on which you need to invest more of your study time than others. It is always better to seek guidance from a professional rather than guessing what you should study.3.Informal questionsIf you lack the idea of how to implement cost, schedule, or risk structure, then it’s a great opportunity for you to understand it. You should learn to shed light on practical application using fundamental examples.You should change your study methods to prepare well for a continuously evolving exam process like the Project Management Professional (PMP)® exam. These days, this exam is based on PMBOK® Guide 6th edition and is a lot harder than it was in the past. The 4 partially correct choices which are provided for all the questions make it even confusing and raise the level of complication for the candidate.The following tricks are surely going to help you in shaping up your exam:Get aligned with the exam dynamics by spending 30 minutes every day on a free exam simulator.Follow the rule of 85%. Keep practicing mock exams until you score at least 85% in all the model exams. This indicates that you are ready to face the PMP® certification exam.Another important trick is to understand the ‘ITTO TRICK Sheet of 49 processes’ which you can find in the PMBOK® guide. This will really prove helpful to you in mapping all the processes inputs, outputs, tools, and techniques.In order to rightly utilize the 12 minutes after the exam, you need to read and memorize the Formula Trick Sheet. You need to print and paste the same on your desk in order to practice it every day because writing this after 4 hours exam will surely help you to track the questions and save significant time.You need to read and memorize the PMPBOK® 6th Edition 49 Process Chart. Print and paste the same on your desk and practice it every day until you can draw the chart within 8 minutes.To wrap it upWhen you begin with your preparation for PMP® certification, you should remember that attaining the PMP® certification shows your commitment to the profession of project management and demonstrates your credibility to earn more as well as raising the value of your resume above the non-certified professionals. Keeping these points in mind will surely help you to avoid getting discouraged during your certification process.You can also learn more about PMP® certification hereThis blog throws light on a few best practices along with some tips and tricks to smoothly proceed with your PMP® journey. It is important for you to set a standard time for your studies other than having a thorough understanding of the PMBOK® guide. So, start clearing your calendar to fit in your daily study time as PMP® needs a lot of thorough studies and is not an easy path to success.
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A Comprehensive Guide to PMP® Exam Preparation

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