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Top 5 certifications for project manager

A project manager handles many responsibilities and takes vital decisions that are necessary to complete the project in a smooth manner. At times, a project manager might feel the need of a formal certification in order to learn new techniques that could improve his/her productivity and also help them climb the corporate ladder. Once the project manager has taken the decision to enrol in a project management classroom training program or an online course, the next question arises as to which training program to pursue. There are a significant number of courses in the market and the best way to choose the one that suits you the best is to understand the principles of the course in a concise manner. Let’s look at 5 such courses that have high demand in the market at present. 1) Project Management Professional (PMP) Project Management Professional is a reputed certification for project managers. It is a widely accepted certification and popular all over the globe. PMP certification is offered by Project Management Institute (PMI). In order to pass the PMP certification training examination, you will need to be well-versed with the various techniques to schedule, plan, monitor, and control a project from start to finish. The 8th edition of the Project Management Salary Survey announced that project managers who possess a PMP certification have monetary benefits of over 17% than their uncertified colleagues. 2) PRINCE2 Practitioner PRINCE2 stands for PRojects IN Controlled Environments. This project management methodology was first introduced in the government offices of the United Kingdom. Following its huge success, it was introduced in the corporate world and now it is used in many organisations around the world. The certification for PRINCE2 is divided into 3 components – PRINCE2 Foundation, PRINCE2 Practitioner, and PRINCE2 Professional. Project managers who have prior experience working in the industry, generally opt for the PRINCE2 Practitioner certification directly. ‘PayScale’ had conducted a survey according to which the highest salary for a PRINCE2 Practitioner was $100,000 depending on their experience. PRINCE2 has its own project management methodology whereas PMP follows a general project management technique. 3) Certified Scrum Master (CSM) Agile and Scrum are popular project management methodologies that help to get more work done in a shorter period of time. It is a methodical process and follows certain principles to successfully complete the project. These methodologies are showing significant growth every year. Hence, pursuing a Certified Scrum Master certification could help you get better job prospects in companies around the world. Even if you’re new to the Scrum methodology, this certification will show that you have knowledge of the various concepts involved in Scrum and that you’re capable of handling projects. At present, there are approximately 400,000 Certified Scrum Masters worldwide which shows the importance and reach of this methodology. 4) CompTIA Project+ CompTIA Project+ has techniques that are similar to PMI’s CAPM. This certification is for entry-level professionals and follows a general project management model. CompTIA was founded back in 1993 and provides various certifications around the world. Though this certification does not require any prerequisites, you will be able to grasp the concepts easily if you have worked on small-scale or medium-scale projects before. The concepts involved in Project+ are not as rigorous as the concept taught in CAPM. Once you complete the certification, you will be able to apply for roles such as project analysts, project coordinators, junior project managers etc. The Project+ certification will also demonstrate the business and communication skills of the individual. 5) Certified Project Manager (CPM) This is a reputed project management certification provided by IAPPM (International Association of Project and Program Management). The main principle followed in this methodology is as to how resources such as money, people, and time can be judiciously utilized in the duration of the project. The other areas of focus of this certification are marketing, communications, HR, risk management, IT, project management and quality management. Regardless of which certification you choose, ensure that you are well-versed with all the concepts of the methodology and that you’re capable of handling the various aspects of a project successfully. Now that you are aware of the principles of each certification, it will be easier to choose the one apt for you. Prepare well before writing the certification examination.
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Top 5 certifications for project manager

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Top 5 certifications for project manager

A project manager handles many responsibilities and takes vital decisions that are necessary to complete the project in a smooth manner. At times, a project manager might feel the need of a formal certification in order to learn new techniques that could improve his/her productivity and also help them climb the corporate ladder. Once the project manager has taken the decision to enrol in a project management classroom training program or an online course, the next question arises as to which training program to pursue. There are a significant number of courses in the market and the best way to choose the one that suits you the best is to understand the principles of the course in a concise manner. Let’s look at 5 such courses that have high demand in the market at present.

1) Project Management Professional (PMP)

Project Management Professional is a reputed certification for project managers. It is a widely accepted certification and popular all over the globe. PMP certification is offered by Project Management Institute (PMI). In order to pass the PMP certification training examination, you will need to be well-versed with the various techniques to schedule, plan, monitor, and control a project from start to finish. The 8th edition of the Project Management Salary Survey announced that project managers who possess a PMP certification have monetary benefits of over 17% than their uncertified colleagues.

2) PRINCE2 Practitioner

PRINCE2 stands for PRojects IN Controlled Environments. This project management methodology was first introduced in the government offices of the United Kingdom. Following its huge success, it was introduced in the corporate world and now it is used in many organisations around the world. The certification for PRINCE2 is divided into 3 components – PRINCE2 Foundation, PRINCE2 Practitioner, and PRINCE2 Professional. Project managers who have prior experience working in the industry, generally opt for the PRINCE2 Practitioner certification directly. ‘PayScale’ had conducted a survey according to which the highest salary for a PRINCE2 Practitioner was $100,000 depending on their experience. PRINCE2 has its own project management methodology whereas PMP follows a general project management technique.

3) Certified Scrum Master (CSM)

Agile and Scrum are popular project management methodologies that help to get more work done in a shorter period of time. It is a methodical process and follows certain principles to successfully complete the project. These methodologies are showing significant growth every year. Hence, pursuing a Certified Scrum Master certification could help you get better job prospects in companies around the world. Even if you’re new to the Scrum methodology, this certification will show that you have knowledge of the various concepts involved in Scrum and that you’re capable of handling projects. At present, there are approximately 400,000 Certified Scrum Masters worldwide which shows the importance and reach of this methodology.

4) CompTIA Project+

CompTIA Project+ has techniques that are similar to PMI’s CAPM. This certification is for entry-level professionals and follows a general project management model. CompTIA was founded back in 1993 and provides various certifications around the world. Though this certification does not require any prerequisites, you will be able to grasp the concepts easily if you have worked on small-scale or medium-scale projects before. The concepts involved in Project+ are not as rigorous as the concept taught in CAPM. Once you complete the certification, you will be able to apply for roles such as project analysts, project coordinators, junior project managers etc. The Project+ certification will also demonstrate the business and communication skills of the individual.

5) Certified Project Manager (CPM)

This is a reputed project management certification provided by IAPPM (International Association of Project and Program Management). The main principle followed in this methodology is as to how resources such as money, people, and time can be judiciously utilized in the duration of the project. The other areas of focus of this certification are marketing, communications, HR, risk management, IT, project management and quality management.

Regardless of which certification you choose, ensure that you are well-versed with all the concepts of the methodology and that you’re capable of handling the various aspects of a project successfully. Now that you are aware of the principles of each certification, it will be easier to choose the one apt for you. Prepare well before writing the certification examination.

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A critical analysis of ‘Functional’ Project Management Organizations

One of the main dilemmas any organization faces when setting up their project team is on making the decision of project composition. Often the organization’s leadership ends up stressing over how to resource the project team.  As we all know a project is a temporary endeavor undertaken to produce a unique product, service or a result. Projects can be undertaken by organizations in any business domain, for any specified duration, in order to achieve a set of goals and objectives. So, the organization may decide to form the project team based on the factors mentioned above. Types of Project Organizational Structures The main three types of project organizational structures are as follows. 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In a large organization, the functional unit heads may have functional managers or operational leadership-level managers working under them who in turn would have a team of executives reporting to them. For example, the HR business unit may have a head of HR, under whom there may be multiple HR managers who are responsible for different aspects of human resource management such as recruitment, performance management, training etc. There will be HR executives working with the HR managers to achieve the objectives of the HR division. Thus, functional organizational structures are to be managed using the current organizational hierarchical structure A temporary team assembled using team members from different functions are formed once the project begins. Project execution in this structure requires the involvement of different functional units. 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This as we see is a tedious task and may result in delays and unwanted stress on the part of staff members. Functional organizational structures often result in a lack of motivation, interest or belongingness among team members and a lack of urgency to complete tasks. They normally end up feeling that a project is just an additional burden that will have no impact on their career progression. Finally, a functional organizational structure is a great mechanism to use when dealing with projects that span multiple functional units and which require specialized technical expertise to complete tasks. Hence, this method must be used sensibly when forming project teams within an organization.  
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7 Basic Quality Tools for Efficient Project Management

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