This Festive Season, enjoy 10% discount on all courses Use Coupon NY10 Click to Copy

Search

Should You Go Agile, Waterfall or Leverage a Combined Approach?

By this article, I wanted to take a closer look at a struggle that most companies face. In the field of project management, there is a debate concerning the ideal approach for the organization to do project management. On one hand, we have a “free” format of Agile and on the other side of the spectrum, we have the traditional Waterfall approach. In this article, I’d like to take a close look at pro’s and con’s for these methodologies and describe how a PM could even use a best of both worlds approach.Traditional/Waterfall methodologyIn a traditional waterfall project, the project manager has given a (somewhat) fixed budget and he or she should accomplish a task within a deadline, which most of the time has resulted into a finished product or service. This is a time-honored traditional way of approaching projects. Where there is a goal, a timespan and a number of resources that should be utilized to achieve that goal.                                                                                           Do You Know?                                                           Waterfall approach is used where the end result is fixed. This approach is particularly useful in situations where the outcome is fixed. Such as the construction of a building or car or even a phone. These products have a physical footprint and changes to these products can almost always be labeled as a completely new project. For example, adding a new floor to the building. The waterfall approach tools of choice are Excel, Microsoft Project (or server) and Primavera. As well as some tools that are highly focused on a specific niche. A traditional project could look something like this (example in Microsoft Project):Pro’s for the traditional/waterfall modelClearly defined resultTime, resources and quality are budgeted up frontCon’s for the traditional/waterfall modelProduct or service is only finished at the end of the projectWhen the end product is ready, it is done. There are no further iterationsThere is a need for a lot of documentationScope creep can be very costly due to late response to changesAgile MethodologyThe completely opposite to the traditional/waterfall approach.  Its origin is found in software development. The Agile Manifesto is the document that describes the Agile methodology and the core values:Individuals and Interactions over processes and toolsWorking Software over comprehensive documentationCustomer Collaboration over contract negotiationResponding to Change over following a plan Organizations are struggling to find a suitable approach for Agile in all departments of the organization. This, in my opinion, is mainly due to the fact that it is found rooted in the software development departments. And therefore wasn’t designed for all types of organizational projects.The Agile approach tools of choice are Excel, Jira, VSTS (or Azure DevOps as it’s now called) Basecamp and Trello. As well as some tools that are highly focused on a specific niche. An Agile “project” could look something like this (example in Microsoft Project):Pros for working AgileFast time to market for a first iteration and working product/serviceHigh focus on quality deliveryCons for working AgileNot all products seem suitable for this approachNo clear end in sightIt requires a team to be fully assigned to the product/serviceDifficult to negotiate budgets to upper managementMaking Agile and Waterfall model work together Agifall approach.As the hype for Agile Project Management is slowly subsiding, there are more and more people that believe that Agile is not the holy grail of project management. We are coming to a more mature understanding of the overall complexity of projects in general. There are so many factors that come into play among others: politics, resource availability, budget, client’s needs, communication difficulties.Maybe we should look for a solution that is best of both worlds. Maybe we can find a way to combine the Agile and traditional Waterfall methodologies. There are multiple sources that advocate a Water–Agile–fall approach. This approach will help to reach a finished product if followed properly. This includes ample documentation and clear goals from the start. But, it also includes an Agile part where a team will have sprints to improve the product in the phase where real development is done. This enforces fast delivery and high quality with a lot of client interaction. In any case; pure Agile and pure Waterfall companies are hard to come by. So, most organizations are pushed to integrate Agile into a Waterfall world, mainly because of certain departments in the organization work more towards Agile than Waterfall and the other way around. Now, let’s see the two popular hybrid methodologies-Water-Scrum-Fall approach Water-Scrum-Fall ApproachWater-Scrum-fall model is the one model which allows the blending of Agile and Waterfall methodologies. The teams like Business analysis and Release management teams conform to the traditional Waterfall model, whereas the Development team and testing team adheres to the Scrum method in a limited way. In Water-Scrum-Fall approach, the processes in the traditional Waterfall model are mixed with the processes of Scrum framework model. The Waterfall processes like planning, requirements gathering, budgeting and documenting the project’s progress are integrated with the timeboxed, iterative version of Scrum during the product development. The mixing of Agile and Traditional Waterfall strategies is done if there are enough details to start the development phase.Water-Scrum-Fall model UsageOrganizations use this approach in the following conditions-When the project needs in-depth details in the planning phase to make a precise budget estimation. Because, if the project processes are well-planned, then the management can also feel secure to portion out the funds for the project implementation.  The natural tendency of the developers and testers to look at the Agile practices during the development phase. This happens because the Agile methodology provides them the chance to collaborate as per the needs of the project. AgiFall methodology The motto of getting the best of Agile and Waterfall gives birth to the concept called AgiFall. This approach was first presented at Vancouver Digital Project Managers Meetup Group. It consists of the mixture of Waterfall and Agile principles. The aim is to increase the speed, decrease the cost, and most importantly improve the quality of the end-product.  The AgiFall approach carries out the Waterfall processes like planning and requirements phases activities in an Agile manner. These activities are broken into the user stories and prioritized them in the Sprint. In this method, you don’t need to wait for one phase to finish to begin the next one. This means that you can carry on with the development process while the planning phase is going on. in AgiFall model, the development phase implements the Agile principles.Can Agile and Waterfall Hybrid go with each other?Today, backlog management replaced the comprehensive documentation due to the evolution of techniques. This can be the best example of successful adoption of the hybrid model. The Waterfall-Agile hybrid model is most suitable for the projects which expect that the team should address and deliver the constantly changing requirements within a limited period of time.When the Manager has to implement a particular methodology during the Planning phase, the best way is to select that methodology which matches the project needs. Additionally, the team should have crystal clear understanding of the hybrid model and its implementation knowledge. Otherwise, it will result in a failure spreading a mess with no benefits.Final notesI hope you liked reading my first article on the Knowledgehut. The screenshots I took came from the Office Insider version of Microsoft Project Pro for Office 365. I’ve done a video on how to get the office insider version. This is the version that includes the newest features released by Microsoft. Such as the Agile board I’ve used in the example of Agile.Keep Planning with Waterfall, Executing with Agile, and Speed up the Product Development process!If you like to read more about Agile and Waterfall, here are some great articles I found interesting to read. Click to read a relevant article which I found interesting.
Rated 4.0/5 based on 2 customer reviews

Should You Go Agile, Waterfall or Leverage a Combined Approach?

4K
Should You Go Agile, Waterfall or Leverage a Combined Approach?

By this article, I wanted to take a closer look at a struggle that most companies face. In the field of project management, there is a debate concerning the ideal approach for the organization to do project management. On one hand, we have a “free” format of Agile and on the other side of the spectrum, we have the traditional Waterfall approach. 

In this article, I’d like to take a close look at pro’s and con’s for these methodologies and describe how a PM could even use a best of both worlds approach.

Traditional/Waterfall methodology
Traditional/Waterfall methodology

In a traditional waterfall project, the project manager has given a (somewhat) fixed budget and he or she should accomplish a task within a deadline, which most of the time has resulted into a finished product or service. This is a time-honored traditional way of approaching projects. Where there is a goal, a timespan and a number of resources that should be utilized to achieve that goal. 

                                                                                          Do You Know?

                                                           Waterfall approach is used where the end result is fixed. 

This approach is particularly useful in situations where the outcome is fixed. Such as the construction of a building or car or even a phone. These products have a physical footprint and changes to these products can almost always be labeled as a completely new project. For example, adding a new floor to the building. 

The waterfall approach tools of choice are Excel, Microsoft Project (or server) and Primavera. As well as some tools that are highly focused on a specific niche. A traditional project could look something like this (example in Microsoft Project):

 Microsoft Project


Pro’s for the traditional/waterfall model

  • Clearly defined result
  • Time, resources and quality are budgeted up front

Con’s for the traditional/waterfall model

  • Product or service is only finished at the end of the project
  • When the end product is ready, it is done. There are no further iterations
  • There is a need for a lot of documentation
  • Scope creep can be very costly due to late response to changes

Agile Methodology

Agile Methodology

The completely opposite to the traditional/waterfall approach.  Its origin is found in software development. The Agile Manifesto is the document that describes the Agile methodology and the core values:

Individuals and Interactions over processes and tools

Working Software over comprehensive documentation

Customer Collaboration over contract negotiation

Responding to Change over following a plan 

Organizations are struggling to find a suitable approach for Agile in all departments of the organization. This, in my opinion, is mainly due to the fact that it is found rooted in the software development departments. And therefore wasn’t designed for all types of organizational projects.

The Agile approach tools of choice are Excel, Jira, VSTS (or Azure DevOps as it’s now called) Basecamp and Trello. As well as some tools that are highly focused on a specific niche. An Agile “project” could look something like this (example in Microsoft Project):

Agile project
Pros for working Agile

  • Fast time to market for a first iteration and working product/service
  • High focus on quality delivery

Cons for working Agile

  • Not all products seem suitable for this approach
  • No clear end in sight
  • It requires a team to be fully assigned to the product/service
  • Difficult to negotiate budgets to upper management

    Cons for working Agile

Making Agile and Waterfall model work together 

  1. Agifall approach.

As the hype for Agile Project Management is slowly subsiding, there are more and more people that believe that Agile is not the holy grail of project management. We are coming to a more mature understanding of the overall complexity of projects in general. There are so many factors that come into play among others: politics, resource availability, budget, client’s needs, communication difficulties.

Maybe we should look for a solution that is best of both worlds. 

Maybe we can find a way to combine the Agile and traditional Waterfall methodologies. There are multiple sources that advocate a Water–Agile–fall approach. This approach will help to reach a finished product if followed properly. 

This includes ample documentation and clear goals from the start. But, it also includes an Agile part where a team will have sprints to improve the product in the phase where real development is done. This enforces fast delivery and high quality with a lot of client interaction. 

In any case; pure Agile and pure Waterfall companies are hard to come by. So, most organizations are pushed to integrate Agile into a Waterfall world, mainly because of certain departments in the organization work more towards Agile than Waterfall and the other way around. Now, let’s see the two popular hybrid methodologies-

  1. Water-Scrum-Fall approach 

Water-Scrum-Fall Approach
Water-Scrum-Fall Approach

Water-Scrum-fall model is the one model which allows the blending of Agile and Waterfall methodologies. The teams like Business analysis and Release management teams conform to the traditional Waterfall model, whereas the Development team and testing team adheres to the Scrum method in a limited way. 

In Water-Scrum-Fall approach, the processes in the traditional Waterfall model are mixed with the processes of Scrum framework model. The Waterfall processes like planning, requirements gathering, budgeting and documenting the project’s progress are integrated with the timeboxed, iterative version of Scrum during the product development. The mixing of Agile and Traditional Waterfall strategies is done if there are enough details to start the development phase.

Water-Scrum-Fall model Usage

Organizations use this approach in the following conditions-

  • When the project needs in-depth details in the planning phase to make a precise budget estimation. Because, if the project processes are well-planned, then the management can also feel secure to portion out the funds for the project implementation.  
  • The natural tendency of the developers and testers to look at the Agile practices during the development phase. This happens because the Agile methodology provides them the chance to collaborate as per the needs of the project.

 AgiFall methodology  AgiFall methodology

The motto of getting the best of Agile and Waterfall gives birth to the concept called AgiFall. This approach was first presented at Vancouver Digital Project Managers Meetup Group. It consists of the mixture of Waterfall and Agile principles. The aim is to increase the speed, decrease the cost, and most importantly improve the quality of the end-product.  

The AgiFall approach carries out the Waterfall processes like planning and requirements phases activities in an Agile manner. These activities are broken into the user stories and prioritized them in the Sprint. In this method, you don’t need to wait for one phase to finish to begin the next one. This means that you can carry on with the development process while the planning phase is going on. in AgiFall model, the development phase implements the Agile principles.

Can Agile and Waterfall Hybrid go with each other?

Today, backlog management replaced the comprehensive documentation due to the evolution of techniques. This can be the best example of successful adoption of the hybrid model. The Waterfall-Agile hybrid model is most suitable for the projects which expect that the team should address and deliver the constantly changing requirements within a limited period of time.

When the Manager has to implement a particular methodology during the Planning phase, the best way is to select that methodology which matches the project needs. Additionally, the team should have crystal clear understanding of the hybrid model and its implementation knowledge. Otherwise, it will result in a failure spreading a mess with no benefits.

Final notes

I hope you liked reading my first article on the Knowledgehut. The screenshots I took came from the Office Insider version of Microsoft Project Pro for Office 365. I’ve done a video on how to get the office insider version. This is the version that includes the newest features released by Microsoft. Such as the Agile board I’ve used in the example of Agile.

Keep Planning with Waterfall, Executing with Agile, and Speed up the Product Development process!

If you like to read more about Agile and Waterfall, here are some great articles I found interesting to read. Click to read a relevant article which I found interesting.

Erik van

Erik van Hurck

Blog Author

Erik van Hurck is a senior PPM consultant working with Projectum, a Nordics and Western Europe based Microsoft Gold partner. Erik’s contribution to the community has awarded with the status of Most Valuable Professional by Microsoft. It is Erik’s goal to help current and future users of Microsofts Project and Portfolio Management software to achieve the most while making their experiences with the tools as enjoyable as possible.

Join the Discussion

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2 comments

Deepak Singh 27 Nov 2018

Thank you Sir for very detailed article

Blessy Princes 28 Nov 2018

Do you have any branches in Hyderabad or I have to take online course?

Suggested Blogs

Reducing Overheads Through SAFe 4.5

Each SAFe portfolio provides a set of business solutions to run a business smoothly. There should be a confined operating budget to execute each portfolio, as the cost of operating each technical solution is a primary factor in every business. However, many traditional companies make out that, doing business using Lean-Agile development gives rise to an intrinsic conflict with the budgeting and project cost accounting methods. The result is worst and unproductive. To cope with this, SAFe provides strategies called Lean-Agile budgets. Lean-Agile budgets can directly solve this conflict of traditional project funding. With the Lean Budgets model, fiduciaries can keep control on the expenditures required for the project. Also, the model is empowered with the programs like rapid-decision making and flexible value delivery. This model can be productive for the enterprises in two ways: Enterprises can yield the best development processes which form the foundation of all the marketing aspects. Can manage the technology expenditures professionally. According to Scaled Agile Institute, Lean-Agile Budgets can be defined as-  “A set of practices that minimizes overhead by funding and empowering Value Streams rather than projects, while maintaining financial and fitness-for-use governance.” According to the law by a fiduciary government for the development and delivery of IT, hardware and software, ‘every SAFe portfolio operates within a familiar and sanctioned investment expenditure’. This principle is applied to the products, services and any kind of solutions within a SAFe portfolio. The following figure illustrates how the traditional strategic planning process allows all portfolios to operate within a budget in an enterprise. Though this is the traditional method, it helps in regulating the spent investment for a SAFe portfolio.  Moreover, SAFe introduced a unique approach to budgeting. This new budgeting technique results in-  Reducing the overhead  Decreasing costs related to traditional cost accounting Enables decentralized decision-making With this latest approach of working, portfolio-level employees (managers) neither have to schedule the work for other team members nor they need to keep track of the work during the project. Lean-Agile Budgets has come up with a new standard for maintaining budgets over the project-level:  Lean Budgeting- beyond project cost accounting:  This standard provides fiduciary control over all the investments, with fewer overheads, friction, and much effective outcome. The following figure shows the governance with Lean-Agile budgeting.   Lean-Agile budgets include the five major steps for empowerment and governance of project cost, as follows: 1) Fund value streams, not projects- This step in Lean budgets focuses on forwarding the associated expense decisions to the employees involved in the project, thereby increasing empowerment and lessening overhead. This is done by assigning Lean budgets to each value stream, as shown in figure: 2) Empower value stream content authority- Though step 1 is a huge jump towards the budgets, the enterprise wants the assurance that the value stream is building the right things. SAFe offers this through the empowerment and responsibilities of Solution and Product Management and provides visibility to everyone by conducting and prioritizing the Solution and Program Backlogs, as shown in the figure below. 3) Provide continuous objective evidence of fitness for purpose- In this step, SAFe furnishes cadence-based opportunities to evaluate progress with the help of Solution Demo. Progress can also be determined every two weeks, if necessary, via System Demo. Customer, Key Stakeholders, Lean Portfolio Management, Business Owners, team and any Fiduciary can participate to inspect whether the build is meeting the customer’s business needs. 4) Approve epic-level initiatives- Epics are large, so they require additional approval. Generally, initiatives impact multiple value streams and ARTs which cost many millions of dollars. To resolve this, it requires vetting through the system, to check which level (Portfolio level, Large Solution level, Program Level) they belong to, as shown in the figure. 5) Exercise fiscal governance with dynamic budgeting- In the final step, Lean Portfolio Management (LPM) adjusts the value stream budgets within the portfolio. Though Value Streams are highly self-organizing, they can’t fund themselves. Funding varies based on the business dynamics, as figure illustrates.   Typically, these budgets are adjustable twice annually. If this happens less frequently, the spending is fixed for an inordinately long period, which limits agility. When this is happening more frequently, the enterprise may be apparently very Agile. But in reality, the process is not so secured. This leads to a long-term uncertainty and eventually gives rise to an environment of non-commitment.   
Rated 4.0/5 based on 20 customer reviews
Reducing Overheads Through SAFe 4.5

Each SAFe portfolio provides a set of business sol... Read More

Agile Project Management Vs. Traditional Project Management

In this fast-moving world, project management has become one of the most important pillars that are helping businesses run without any glitch in their processes. Both small and large scale organizations around the world are exploiting technology and depending on project management systems to deliver the software development project successfully. Whether it is team workflow management or timing, these tools help to ensure that everything is going well without any obstacles. While there are tens of different project management approaches, Agile is considered one of the most practical and flexible software development mechanism that exist today. It is capable of executing a variety of tasks, but what sets it apart from others? Let’s find it out. Here’s a brief comparison of Agile management and traditional project management software:                                                                                                                    Traditional vs Agile Project Management Overview of Agile and Traditional Project Management What is Traditional Project Management? The traditional Project Management (waterfall) approach is linear where all the phases of a process occur in sequence. Its concept depends on predictable tools and predictable experience. Each and every project follows the same life cycle which includes the stages such as feasibility, plan, design, build, test, production, support, as shown in the figure above. The entire project is planned upfront without any scope for changing requirements. This approach assumes that time and cost are variables and requirements are fixed. This is the reason why traditional project management faces budget and timeline issues. What is Agile Project Management? When a traditional system focuses on upfront planning where factors like cost, scope, and time are given importance, Agile management gives prominence to teamwork, customer collaboration, and flexibility. It is an iterative approach that focuses more on incorporating customer feedback and continuous releases with every iteration of software development project. The basic concept behind Agile software development is that it delves into evolving changes and collaborative effort to bring out results rather than a predefined process. Adaptive planning is perhaps the biggest feature of Agile and one that makes it a crowd favorite among project managers. Scrum and Kanban are two of the most widely used Agile frameworks. They are very well known for encouraging decision-making and preventing time consumption on variables that are bound to change. It stresses customer satisfaction and uses available teams to fast-track software development at every stage. The table below shows the major differences between Agile project management and traditional project management.                                                                                Table: Agile project management vs traditional project management Why is Agile Preferred and why not the traditional project management? Agile is preferred by most developers and managers because of a variety of reasons. Let’s have a look at the most common ones: Project complexity Traditional: This method is the best fit for small or less complex projects as it follows linear approach. Sudden changes in the project or any other complexities can block the entire process and make the team go back to step one and start all over again. Agile: This is the best methodology to follow in case of complex projects. A complex project may have various interconnected phases and each stage may be dependent on many others rather than a single one as in simple projects. So, Agile methods are preferred for large complex projects, as they can respond better to such structures. Adaptability Traditional: This approach works with a belief that once a phase is done, it will not be reviewed again. So, it is not adaptable to rapid changes in the work plan. In case if any sudden situation arises or any change in the requirements from the client’s side, traditional approach fails to adapt to the new change. The only choice is to start from the very beginning once again. This wastes a lot of effort and time in the process. Agile: The adaptability factor is very high in this methodology since it is not linear. Complex projects consist of several interconnected stages, where a change in one stage can cause an effect on another. And the project managers can take calculated risks in such scenario, as there is a chance of high adaptability.  Scope for feedback and changes Traditional Each and every process is clearly detailed and defined at the start of the project in the traditional approach. It cannot deal with any big change or feedback that might require a change in the process. Mostly, the project delivery time and budget are fixed, allows change very rarely. Agile There is a high acceptance for feedback and change in this method. The process is very flexible and allows constant feedback that can help to provide better output within the fixed project delivery time. The main reason that managers or developers choose agile direction is for the flexibility it offers. Developers working with Agile management are able to respond to customer requests quickly as they are only addressing small parts of the project at a time and the customer validates each iteration or sprint before finalizing. Some of the important characteristics of Agile development Breaks project into parts Agile divides a project into parts (called iterations) where the release is sent to the customer after every single iteration. Additionally, the success of the project can be easily foreseen through the success of these iterations. This removes the need for upfront planning completely. Self-organized As mentioned above, Agile uses a parallel mode of management. Employees of a company are not managed by a central line of control, but by groups. For example, in Agile, there may be eight teams working on a single project. Each team is managed by itself without external guidance. The teams only interact with each other for project discussion and process linking as they are otherwise not self-sufficient. Generally speaking, an Agile project consists of three parts: The product owner – the expert on the project (for which the product is being developed) and is the main person who oversees the projects The scrum master – this person manages the process involved in Agile. He/she looks after the iterations and its completion The team – individuals who play significant and minor roles in the software development process Customer Engagement In Agile, customer engagement is at the very top. The customer is regarded highly in its frameworks as after every iteration, feedback is generated and acted upon. Overall, Agile is clearly the winner among project management systems. When compared with other traditional approaches, Agile’s features come to the fore and reiterate why it is one of the top software used by companies globally. Can Agile Coexist with Other Approaches? This is a question asked by many project managers, and opinions of experts seem to be divided. While some say it is possible for Agile to coexist with traditional project management systems, they suggest being cautious and using them for different terms. For example, using two different approaches on the same project can be counter-productive and highly explosive. As Agile and most other frameworks are totally contrasting to each other, the projects may go for a toss. On the other hand, some experts believe that it is not possible for Agile and other tools to co-exist because of their contrast. Using them together can cause disorder in the entire company system, making the productivity to go for a toss. Agile vs Traditional- Adoption Growth According to a recent online survey of 601 IT and development professionals, it is proved that Agile is the new typical formula for project success. The majority of projects and development teams are now adopting this methodology, while the traditional waterfall approaches have many flaws.    Traditional organizations vs. #Agile organizations #SALC16 pic.twitter.com/bBgxkQB1fI — Scrum Alliance (@ScrumAlliance) January 20, 2016 Agile was first introduced about 15 years ago as a substitute for traditional software development approaches. Many people considered it as challenging to implement traditional approach practices and Agile adopters stated that this new style of software development improves team collaboration and is more customer-centric.  Though Agile method was present more than a decade ago, the vast majority of organizations have adopted the practice in the last 5 years. Moreover, the survey reported that agile adoption saw an inflection point between the year 2009-2010. As shown in the above figure, agile adoption seems to have slow incremental growth till 2008 and then its growth was accelerated after gaining traction in the market. Reasons for the transition to Agile Most of the organizations who transitioned from traditional to agile project management have listed the following reasons: Improves collaboration between teams- 54% Enhances the quality level of software in organizations- 52% Results in enhanced customer satisfaction- 49% Speeds time to market- 43% Reduces development cost- 42% The Verdict In the traditional software development, the customer involves only before the start of the development process. So, there might be a number of mistakes and a large amount of money needs to be spent to rework on them. Since in the Agile software development, the customer involves at each stage, the corrections can be made once the defects are detected. This helps us in saving cost. As we can see, Agile project management is really in-demand for teams. It helps the team to work on the top priority ones at the right time and allows them to walk through the risks much faster than they would with traditional project management tools.  
Rated 4.0/5 based on 2 customer reviews
6403
Agile Project Management Vs. Traditional Project M...

In this fast-moving world, project management has ... Read More

Scrum Master and Product Owner: Understanding the differences

 Agile methodology imparts the easy and convenient path to work. Scrum is one of the famous Agile methodologies. Agile methodologies consists of 4 main roles, viz. Product Owner, Scrum Master, Scrum team and Stakeholder. Each role has its share of responsibilities. These roles are all about commitment. Scrum master and the Product owner are two vital roles in the Scrum Software Development Methodology. Since they both are working on different areas of the project, they are indispensable for the project. Scrum Master is a mediator between the Product owner and the Development Team.       Product Owner vs Scrum Master- Though the Product Owner and the Scrum master vary in their roles, they complement each other. Scrum master should support the product Owner in every step possible. There should be an amicable relationship between the Product owner and the Scrum master. Disputes may happen between them if the roles are not clarified. Let us have a look at the differences in roles between the product owner and the scrum master. The Scrum Master concentrates on the project success, by assisting the product owner and the team in using the right process for creating a successful target and establishing the Agile principles.    Scrum Master Skills (SM): SM creates a friendly environment for the team for Agile development. SM improves the quality of the product. Certified Scrum Master Certification, adds advantage to become effective. SM protects his team from any kind of distraction and allows them to stay tuned. SM helps product owner to maximize ROI (return on investment) to meet the objectives. SM removes disputes between the product owner and the development team. SM encourages the team to meet the project deadline. SM acts like a coach for a team to perform better. A good Scrum Master should possess the skills like project management, engineering, designing, testing background and disciplines. SM provides continuous guidance to teams   Duties of Scrum Master: SM facilitates team for better vision and always tries to improve the efficiency of the teams. SM manages Scrum processes in Agile methodology. SM removes impediments for the Scrum team. SM arranges daily quick stand-up meetings to ensure proper use of processes. SM helps product owner to prepare good product backlog and sets it for the next sprint. Conducting retrospective meetings. SM organizes and facilitates the sprint planning meeting. The Product Owner’s responsibility is to focus on the product success, to build a product which works better for the users and the customers and to create a product which meets business requirements. The product owner can interact with the users and customers, stakeholders, the development team and the scrum master.   Product Owner Skills (PO): PO should have an idea about the business value of the product and the customers’ demands. Certified Scrum Product Owner Certification (CSPO) will be beneficial for the sales team. The development team consults PO, so he should always be available for them to implement the features correctly. PO should understand the program from the end-user point of view. Marketing is discussed on the sales level in most of the Organizations. So it is the PO’s duty to guide the marketing persons to achieve the goals successfully. PO is responsible for the product and the ways to flourish a business. PO has to focus for the proper production and ROI as well. PO should be able to solve the problems, completing trade-off analysis and making decisions about business deliverables. After CSPO course, PO can work with the project managers and the technical leads to prioritize the scope for product development. Sometimes PO and the Customers are same, sometimes Customers are thousands or millions of people.   Duties of the Product Owner: PO has to attend the daily sprint planning meetings. PO prioritizes the product features, so the development team can clearly understand them. PO decides the deadlines for the project. PO determines the release date and contents. PO manages and creates the product backlog for implementation, which is nothing but the prioritized backlog of user stories. PO defines user stories to the development team. Spending some time to prioritize the user stories with few team members. One can enhance his/her knowledge in many directions and beyond boundaries, after undergoing the Certified Scrum Product Owner (CSPO) training.
Rated 4.0/5 based on 1 customer reviews
4086
Scrum Master and Product Owner: Understanding the ...

 Agile methodology imparts the easy and convenien... Read More