This Festive Season, enjoy 10% discount on all courses Use Coupon NY10 Click to Copy

Search

Difference Between Agile and Scrum

Agile describes a set of guiding principles that uses iterative approach for software development, while Scrum is a specific set of rules that are to be followed while practicing the Agile software development. Agile Agile management represents various o software-development methodologies that have been influenced by iterative and incremental development, which includes Extreme Programming (XP), Rational Unified Process (RUP), Scrum, and others. Agile process or methods provide an environment where there is constant evolution in requirements and evolution as a result of collaboration between self-organising cross-functional teams. Agile methodologies foster a disciplined project-management approach that encourages a set of best practices, allowing a rapid delivery of high-quality software and enhancing a business approach, which aligns development with the customer needs. The Agile methodologies stand in contrast to the traditional waterfall methodology, where all the requirements are initially analysed and documented before the development begins. While in Agile approach, requirements are like the actual software-development advances within each iteration. This approach provides flexibility in accommodating changes in the requirements and priorities of the business. The Agile development process aligns with the concepts of Agile Manifesto. Also known as Manifesto for Agile Software Development, the Agile Manifesto is a formal declaration of 4 key values and 12 principles supporting an iterative approach to software development. The Agile development methodology enables assessment of project direction throughout the development lifecycle. This is achieved through regular iterations, and when revaluation is done at every iteration, it greatly reduces the development costs and time. Agile helps the companies to build the right product. Benefits of Agile include as follows: • Benefits the Customers In the traditional waterfall model, the high-value features are developed and delivered in longer cycles compared to the Agile approach, which enables delivery within short cycles. This enables the vendors to be more responsive to the development requests of the customers. • Benefits the Vendors Adopting Agile benefits the vendors by having an improved customer satisfaction and customer retention, leading to more customer contacts through positive references. The Agile allows the vendor’s focus to be on the development effort of high-value features, decrease the overheads, and improve efficiency. • Quality With Agile development, there is a regular inspection of the working product, with testing integrated at every iteration, as it develops throughout the lifecycle. This in turn retains the quality of the product and also allows the product owner to make necessary adjustments whenever a quality issue arises. • Visibility Agile methodology is a collaborative approach that encourages active user participation throughout the product development. This gives an exceptional and clear visibility of the project’s progress and product development to the stakeholders. • Cost Control Agile development process has fixed timescale where the requirements emerge and evolve as the project progresses and the product is developed. This enables a fixed budget. • Risk Management In Agile methodology, small incremental releases are made visible to the product owner throughout the development cycle, which helps identify issues at an early stage, and it makes easier to respond to change, if any. Agile development ensures clear visibility, which allows necessary decisions to be taken at the earliest possible opportunity. Scrum Scrum, on the other hand, is a subset of Agile. A Scrum is a simple and flexible Agile methodology for software development. The Scrum is not a technique or a process but a lightweight and simple framework to address complex problems of a project and deliver a high-value product creatively. The major distinguishing attributes of Scrum are as follows: • Simplicity The development in Scrum is done in sprints, which are 1, 2, and 3 weeks in length. The Scrum team consists of: 1. Product Owner: The major responsibility of the product owner is to maximize the value of the product and work of the development team. Additional duties include managing the product catalogue. 2. Scrum Master: The development team consists of self-organising professionals who turn the product catalogue into product increment at the end of each sprint. 3. Development Team: The Scrum Masters make sure that the Scrum team is abiding by the Scrum theory and its rules. • Flexibility In the traditional waterfall model, when the business and technical requirements are documented and detailed, it results in endless documentation. The Scrum makes use of user stories to describe the functions needed to be developed. A tool called Pivotal Tracker is used to store these user stories in a backlog. If a change needs to be made or a need arises to add to the user stories, in that case the team can adjust as early as the next sprint. This allows the business to change their minds and the development team to be flexible enough to adjust to those changes. The ability to accommodate change is a powerful attribute of the Scrum methodology. • Communication and Collaboration In Scrum methodology, the communication between business users takes place on a daily/weekly basis according to the sprint schedule. This close communication and collaboration is a crucial factor, promoting the success of the Scrum methodology. The Scrum team achieves collaboration in following ways: 1. The Product Owner, the Scrum Master, and the development team work closely on a daily basis. 2. Sprint-planning meetings are conducted, which allows the development team to organise its work based on the knowledge gathered from the business priorities. 3. Conducting daily scrum meetings where the development team can account for the work completed, its future prospects, and deal with issues if any. 4. Conducting sprint reviews allows the team members to evaluate their former work by recommending better practices with every sprint. There are more details on Agile & scum differences
Rated 4.0/5 based on 20 customer reviews

Difference Between Agile and Scrum

2K
Difference Between Agile and Scrum

Agile describes a set of guiding principles that uses iterative approach for software development, while Scrum is a specific set of rules that are to be followed while practicing the Agile software development.

Agile

Agile management represents various o software-development methodologies that have been influenced by iterative and incremental development, which includes Extreme Programming (XP), Rational Unified Process (RUP), Scrum, and others. Agile process or methods provide an environment where there is constant evolution in requirements and evolution as a result of collaboration between self-organising cross-functional teams. Agile methodologies foster a disciplined project-management approach that encourages a set of best practices, allowing a rapid delivery of high-quality software and enhancing a business approach, which aligns development with the customer needs. The Agile methodologies stand in contrast to the traditional waterfall methodology, where all the requirements are initially analysed and documented before the development begins. While in Agile approach, requirements are like the actual software-development advances within each iteration. This approach provides flexibility in accommodating changes in the requirements and priorities of the business.

The Agile development process aligns with the concepts of Agile Manifesto. Also known as Manifesto for Agile Software Development, the Agile Manifesto is a formal declaration of 4 key values and 12 principles supporting an iterative approach to software development. The Agile development methodology enables assessment of project direction throughout the development lifecycle. This is achieved through regular iterations, and when revaluation is done at every iteration, it greatly reduces the development costs and time. Agile helps the companies to build the right product. Benefits of Agile include as follows:

• Benefits the Customers

In the traditional waterfall model, the high-value features are developed and delivered in longer cycles compared to the Agile approach, which enables delivery within short cycles. This enables the vendors to be more responsive to the development requests of the customers.

• Benefits the Vendors

Adopting Agile benefits the vendors by having an improved customer satisfaction and customer retention, leading to more customer contacts through positive references. The Agile allows the vendor’s focus to be on the development effort of high-value features, decrease the overheads, and improve efficiency.

• Quality

With Agile development, there is a regular inspection of the working product, with testing integrated at every iteration, as it develops throughout the lifecycle. This in turn retains the quality of the product and also allows the product owner to make necessary adjustments whenever a quality issue arises.

• Visibility

Agile methodology is a collaborative approach that encourages active user participation throughout the product development. This gives an exceptional and clear visibility of the project’s progress and product development to the stakeholders.

• Cost Control

Agile development process has fixed timescale where the requirements emerge and evolve as the project progresses and the product is developed. This enables a fixed budget.

• Risk Management

In Agile methodology, small incremental releases are made visible to the product owner throughout the development cycle, which helps identify issues at an early stage, and it makes easier to respond to change, if any. Agile development ensures clear visibility, which allows necessary decisions to be taken at the earliest possible opportunity.

Scrum

Scrum, on the other hand, is a subset of Agile. A Scrum is a simple and flexible Agile methodology for software development. The Scrum is not a technique or a process but a lightweight and simple framework to address complex problems of a project and deliver a high-value product creatively. The major distinguishing attributes of Scrum are as follows:

• Simplicity

The development in Scrum is done in sprints, which are 1, 2, and 3 weeks in length. The Scrum team consists of:

1. Product Owner: The major responsibility of the product owner is to maximize the value of the product and work of the development team. Additional duties include managing the product catalogue.

2. Scrum Master: The development team consists of self-organising professionals who turn the product catalogue into product increment at the end of each sprint.

3. Development Team: The Scrum Masters make sure that the Scrum team is abiding by the Scrum theory and its rules.

• Flexibility

In the traditional waterfall model, when the business and technical requirements are documented and detailed, it results in endless documentation. The Scrum makes use of user stories to describe the functions needed to be developed. A tool called Pivotal Tracker is used to store these user stories in a backlog. If a change needs to be made or a need arises to add to the user stories, in that case the team can adjust as early as the next sprint. This allows the business to change their minds and the development team to be flexible enough to adjust to those changes. The ability to accommodate change is a powerful attribute of the Scrum methodology.

• Communication and Collaboration

In Scrum methodology, the communication between business users takes place on a daily/weekly basis according to the sprint schedule. This close communication and collaboration is a crucial factor, promoting the success of the Scrum methodology. The Scrum team achieves collaboration in following ways:

1. The Product Owner, the Scrum Master, and the development team work closely on a daily basis.

2. Sprint-planning meetings are conducted, which allows the development team to organise its work based on the knowledge gathered from the business priorities.

3. Conducting daily scrum meetings where the development team can account for the work completed, its future prospects, and deal with issues if any.

4. Conducting sprint reviews allows the team members to evaluate their former work by recommending better practices with every sprint.

There are more details on Agile & scum differences

KnowledgeHut

KnowledgeHut Editor

Author

KnowledgeHut is a fast growing Management Consulting and Training firm that is a source of Intelligent Information support for businesses and professionals across the globe.


Website : http://www.knowledgehut.com/

Join the Discussion

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

7 comments

Quotes Tadka 24 Jan 2017

Fantastic web site. A lot of useful information here. I'm sending it to some friends ans additionally sharing in delicious. And obviously, thanks to your effort!

happy valentine’s day 2017 greetings 25 Jan 2017

You are so interesting! I don't think I've truly read through something like this before. So great to find somebody with some genuine thoughts on this topic. Seriously.. thanks for starting this up. This site is something that is needed on the web, someone with a bit of originality!

Click here 30 Jan 2017

You actually make it seem really easy along with your presentation however I in finding this topic to be really one thing which I think I might by no means understand. It seems too complex and very wide for me. I am looking forward for your subsequent post, I will try to get the dangle of it!

Enoch Dowse 02 Feb 2017

This is a topic close to my heart cheers, where are your contact details though?

www.boyatuzs.com 02 Feb 2017

Good answer back in return of this issue with genuine arguments and describing all about that.

KnowledgeHut 07 Feb 2017

Hi Enoch Dwose We can provide you mail ID details, editor@knowledgehut.co You can subscribe us for more posts.

Easy ways to make money 14 Feb 2017

Have you ever considered about including a little bit more than just your articles? I mean, what you say is fundamental and all. But just imagine if you added some great visuals or videos to give your posts more, "pop"! Your content is excellent but with pics and video clips, this blog could definitely be one of the greatest in its niche. Amazing blog!

Suggested Blogs

CSM, PSM, SSM, SASM - What Scrum Master Course Do I Choose?

Scrum adoption is growing very fast and companies are looking for well qualified Scrum Masters. This is one of the main reasons to consider Scrum certification. One simple way to present your excellence is the Scrum Master certification that is perfectly tailored to the industry requirements, and of course, to your career trajectory. Currently, there are 4 primary Scrum Master certifications available. You might be in a confusion regarding the best course to take up for a superior career growth. Question yourself on some of the essentials before actually choosing the course: What does the particular certification mean?What are the prerequisites for this certification?What is the cost of this certification program?What will I achieve by taking this certification?Will this certification offer the biggest benefit for me? In this article, we will help you in choosing the best certification that suits your profile by comparing all the courses based on different aspects. CSM, PSM, SSM, SASM - What Scrum Master Course Do I Choose? https://t.co/hRgUIZfV1Z— विवेक कृष्णान (@vksvicky) May 17, 2017All the 4 certifications are competing equally in the Scrum world. The above certification comparison demonstrates multiple facets of the in-demand Scrum certifications. Experts need to choose the course wisely based on their targets. For example, the target can be whether to:Get benefits in their job change or career orReach greater heights in Scrum role by gaining in-depth knowledge  Just choosing the right course is not enough for a better career growth, but choosing the right training provider will have a great impact on the success of a course. KnowledgeHut as a Global Registered Education Provider (REP) of Scrum Alliance offers the best training from Certified Scrum Master Training approved by Scrum Alliance.All the best for your future Scrum endeavours! 
Rated 4.5/5 based on 22 customer reviews
7447
CSM, PSM, SSM, SASM - What Scrum Master Course Do ...

Scrum adoption is growing very fast and companies ... Read More

Themes, Epics, And The Art Of Writing User Stories

User stories are as critical and essential in the Scrum world as the requirement documents in the traditional Waterfall world. Even if we try to avoid the controversial comparison, the need for both is unavoidable.Please note, the Scrum Guide doesn’t talk about the user stories. So, the very definition, scope or constraints of user stories are open to interpretation and the subject to be improvised.Though the widely popular and acceptable understanding of user stories is that-The user stories are the requirements told from end-user perspective to capture the description of a product feature.So, what are epics and themes?An epic is a large story which is comprised of potential smaller stories for implementation. The stories in an epic have a common objective. And thus, it often makes more sense to deliver all user stories of a single epic at one go.Theme is even a bigger brother of both epics and user stories. The focus area of a theme is generally of an organization level.A follow-up question may be –Why don’t we document all requirements just as stories?The answer is – the size. It is difficult to document organization-level requirements as stories. And it is also difficult to implement requirements that are as big as epics. Thus the requirement capture goes as-Themes -> Epics -> Stories.While the implementation adds up as-Stories -> Epics -> Themes.Writing the user stories is what we are going to focus more in this article. ‘Why’ we need user stories, I am assuming is obvious to many. The ‘how’ part is what we will talk about now.User stories can be horizontal slicing of product features or vertical.Horizontal slicing is breaking down the stories by the type (/component/technologies) of work. While vertical slicing is breaking down the stories by the business features. So, if we are making a shopping portal, the horizontal slices are stories based on backend, integration, UI, or testing functionalities. While, vertical slicing would be driven by business features like login, checkout, payment etc.Let’s take the analogy of cutting a birthday cake. Horizontally cutting will give you either the base cake or frosting or fondant decoration. While a vertical slice will be everything, but of an eatable size.Horizontal breakdown is a never a good idea with Scrum (nor while cutting a birthday cake). The reasons being:It doesn’t fit well with the definition of done. Even if you have delivered a backend story or a UI story, it is not a testable, working or deployable feature.There are interdependencies among the pieces as they can be tested only they after they are stitched together.Let us take the scenario of an online shop to sell art supplies. We will have standard business features like-LoginRegistration of usersAdding items into shopping cartPaymentLogoutSo if we write –“As a user, I should be able to check out the items I have added in my cart”, this is not granular enough to implement. This is our ‘epic’.Our user stories can be:“As a first time user, I will be asked to either register or purchase as a guest user when I check out the items I have added in my cart”“As a registered user, I will be shown the items added in my wish list so that if I want I can add them to my cart when I check out”If you feel the stories are still vague, the user stories can be made more detailed by adding “conditions of satisfaction”. And if needed, they can be split into multiple, smaller user stories.Additional considerations for writing good user stories:1) SizeSince the Scrum Guide doesn’t talk about user stories, there is no standard rule of how big (or small) a user story is meant to be. By all practical purposes we know – it has to be small enough to be delivered as a part of one sprint. With the better understanding of Scrum and team dynamics, the team gets better at estimating the size of a user story or how many stories they can accommodate in a sprint.2) PerspectiveUser stories are always written from the perspective of an end user (or customer).  So the widely used template is –As a < (specific) type of user >, I want < goal/business feature > so that < reason to validate the goal/business feature >.3) AuthorIt is the product owner’s responsibility to ensure the product backlog of Agile user stories exists. However, it is of not much importance who actually are writing those stories. In a happy scenario, all team members should be capable enough to write user stories.4) SimplicityLike any English statement; a simple, readable and easily understandable statement is the want of one and all. The best stories are the ones that leave no scope of ambiguity. Write your stories so that they are easy to understand. Keep them simple and concise. Please note – user stories should include the format- who-wants what-why.The ‘how’ shouldn’t be included. ‘How’ is the technical implementation part, better left to the teams to decide.5) ReadinessThe user stories have to be granular enough to be taken up by the team to implement. One has to keep refining the stories until they are ‘ready’ (to be implemented). Break down the epics, to the more implementable size stories. Another aspect of readiness is that team is having a shared common understanding of the user stories of the current sprint.6) AccessibilityKeep your stories visible and accessible to the team. The product backlog is an evolving artifact and explains the product vision. The team needs to be aligned with the product vision. Thus the access to product backlog and the user stories helps the team with the implementation and sprint planning. One quick way is to put up the user stories of the current sprint on a wall. Sticky notes, posters, paper cards, whatever works with the team. This fosters collaboration and creates transparency.7) Beyond StoriesSo far we talked about what are user stories, how to break them down, and the tips and tricks to write better stories. Yet in the end, I am asking you not to rely completely on user stories.The reason is simple.A great product needs more than stories. User story is a great tool to capture business features or product functionality, but they cannot help much with user journeys. An assisted visual journey using story maps, sketches, mock-ups, workflow diagrams helps the team further to understand the overall flow.
Rated 4.0/5 based on 4 customer reviews
Themes, Epics, And The Art Of Writing User Stories

User stories are as critical and essential in the ... Read More

Top Tools And Techniques For A Better Product Vision and Discovery

Understanding the customer needs and developing a product which helps fulfill those needs, defines the usability of the product. With varied perceptions of the underlying problems, assumptions over customer behavior and cognitive bias for a solution, it may get cumbersome to determine the right product that delivers value.To develop a usable product, it is important for all involved in product discovery to collaborate and develop a common vision, strategic goals and shared understanding. A meaningful product discovery helps to map problems to potential solutions, and potential solutions to expected results.In this article, we will discover ways that can help teams with determining the key objectives and developing a common vision for the product. Opportunity canvasCreated by Jeff Patton; author of book “User Story Mapping” and inspired by Marty Cagan’s work on Opportunity Assessment template, the Opportunity Canvas is an exploration and collaboration tool that brings all related information in a single canvas view. Be it a product idea, a new feature in your existing product or a problem with an unexplored solution, the opportunity canvas enables you to collaborate, discuss and assess the opportunity at hand.When to use it?Opportunity canvas is a useful at the time of product discovery. In your quest to explore and develop an understanding of certain business processes and customer needs, opportunity canvas can be a great starting point. As a product discovery tool, the opportunity canvas could be drawn on a whiteboard or printed on a sheet, as convenient. The ideas could be filled in with sticky notes, pictures, workflow, and text.Who should be involved?Anyone who can contribute to the opportunity and product discovery. In case you are following the Scrum framework, this could be represented as an interaction between the Product owner, development team and any other invited Stakeholders.How to use?Decide a place, a few markers, sticky-notes, papers, whiteboard, and all that you need to express your thoughts. Bring in the people who could contribute or hold a stake in your solution and begin from the first section till the end as indicated in the canvas template. If you have drawn the opportunity canvas on a bigger board, you can paste your sticky-notes.The below infographic shows the product roadmap to deliver a high-quality product successfully.Section 1: Start with a problem or the ideaYou have a problem to solve, that may be impeding your business; manual work, product issues, inefficient processes, customer retention & growth challenges or disruptive competition. Start with it. OR You have an idea that offers something new to your customers, which they haven’t experienced as yet. You believe your solution idea is disruptive and may change how the things are structured. Start with that.Section 2: Users and CustomersIdentify users and customers; describe their challenges that you are trying to address through this opportunity. The user and customers can either be the same group of people or different depending on the product. In general, customers are users who pay a cost for certain desired services e.g. premium accounts; unlike users who may be interested in basic or free offerings.Identify the type of users and their distinct goals. Section 3: What solutions exist today?Discover what happens today. How users are working around the given problem. This will highlight the limitations of the current solution and as you discover this, you may come across more problems that may be hampering your customersSection 4: Business ChallengesThe challenges faced by users and customers are likely to impact your business. Persistent issues may disengage the users from your product and services. They may open opportunities for competition; which is a risk of losing business.In the case of manual and time consuming repeatable efforts to serve customer needs, your staff may be constantly engaged in firefighting and have little opportunity to innovate and improve; it’s a growth risk. Discover how different challenges faced by customers are hurting your business?Section 5. How will users use your solution?As you discuss the problems and challenges or ponder upon an idea, you will discover potential solutions. In this section, think about how the user will interact with this potential solution? How will this solution impact the user behavior? And how do you expect users to benefit from it?Section 6. User MetricsHow do you know if a given solution works well or not? Defining user metrics will help set objectives to measure the usability of the product. Based on the user behavior as gathered in the Section 5 above, think about the indicators that will help measure the degree of acceptance of your solution. How will you know that users find value in your solution?For example:You may want to know if your product is engaging the customers i.e. indicated by how much time they spend on your product and if they revisit or;If the lead time of a customer request will significantly reduce by using your product i.e. time spent to complete a task vs expected time in a future state with your solutionSection 7. Adoption StrategyThink about how customers will discover your solution. What channels may draw customers to your product. For instance, it could be either referral from existing customers or marketing through media. If your solution is for internal usage of the organization, think about how you will help users to migrate from their existing methods to a new solution.Section 8. Business benefits and metricsOnce the users have adopted your solution; what impact is it likely to make to your business? And what are the parameters to measure that? The solution may be expected to generate outcomes like direct revenue growth through an increase in customer base; or remedy a loss-making business process.Section 9: BudgetThis section helps you evaluate and compare the proposed solution to any alternatives, based on economic feasibility. What are the implications of not addressing the problem? If the proposed solution is applied, what benefit it may bring to business in monetary terms? What budget may an organization allocate to experiment, learn and validate any assumptions about the proposed solution?At the end of this exercise, you may expect some of the following outcomesA high-level roadmap for your productA Shared understanding of the problem and solutionStrategic goals for the businessIdentified users and customersAlternative approachesA vision of a solutionOnce you have gathered your thoughts and have developed a shared understanding, it’s useful to summarize it and form a vision that group can stick and look up to in the course of building the solution.Vision statementA concise, compelling and unambiguous vision helps the team to remain focused on its product goals. A vision should define the product objectives, its intended customers, value proposition and differentiating factor from competitor’s product, or a predecessor product or workflow that you intend to replace.The elevator pitch mentioned in Geoffrey Moore’s book “Crossing the Chasm”, is a popular template to define a product vision.TemplateConstituentsTarget customerDefine the target customer for your product. If you have used an opportunity canvas to explore your users and customers, those will go here.ProblemSummarize the core challenges faced by the customer.Product nameWrite the name of the product. You don’t need to spend too much time on choosing a name at the beginning. Just put an identifier codename.Product categoryDefine the type of the product. A website or a mobile application or service, as applicable.Key benefitsMention the key features of your product that align with the value desired by the target customers.AlternativeName and comparable feature of a product that you are competing against. In case your product is meant for internal consumption and replaces either a manual process or a legacy application, describe that here.Key differenceExpress how your product is different from the competition and highlight the benefits.ExampleSummaryIn summary, the tools like Opportunity canvas and Vision statement help all involved in product discovery to identify customers, define key objectives and measurable outcomes through collaboration and shared understanding. The opportunity canvas takes you through a journey to explore and discover the challenges and solutions, and helps you define a product roadmap. The vision statements, on the other hand, lets you summarize your key objectives in a concise, unambiguous way to keep you focused.Hope you enjoyed reading the article. Please share your views and feedback.
Rated 4.0/5 based on 2 customer reviews
Top Tools And Techniques For A Better Product Visi...

Understanding the customer needs and developing a ... Read More

other Blogs