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SAFe®️ 4.6 - The Latest Entrant In SAFe®️ Series With 5 Core Competencies

Scaled Agile Inc. (SAI) recently announced the latest version of SAFe®️, SAFe®️ 4.6 with the help of the whole Scaled Agile team and SAFe®️ Contributors. The SAFe®️ 4.6 version has underlined the introduction of ‘Five Core Competencies’ of the Lean Enterprise. The purpose behind incorporating those competencies is mainly to make the SAFe®️ organizations build a truly Lean Enterprise in a Lean fashion.  According to the Gartner report, SAFe®️ 4.5 is delineated as the world’s most widely used Agile framework at the enterprise level.This new way of working with SAFe®️ will open new avenues after the introduction of these competencies. At the same time, these competencies will become the primary lens for understanding and executing SAFe®️ in the organizations. Also, this new way of SAFe®️ working can make a big difference to the organizations that are struggling with their transformations.Here are the names of the five competencies introduced newly to build a better Lean organization in a Lean way. Lean-Agile Leadership Team and Technical Agility  DevOps and Release on demand  Business Solutions and Lean Systems Engineering  Lean Portfolio ManagementBenefits of SAFe®️ 4.6 competenciesHaving these five competencies allows organizations to-Navigate digital disruptionsRespond to the volatile market conditionsMeeting the varying customer requirements and latest technologiesLet’s explore each competency in details below.1) Lean-Agile Leadership:The Lean-Agile Leadership competency focuses on describing how the Lean-Agile leaders steer organizational change by encouraging the individuals and teams to reach their highest potential. The Lean-Agile leaders do this by learning, exhibiting, and coaching the Lean-Agile mindset, core values, principles, practices & features of SAFe®️.Changes made in Lean-Agile Leadership in SAFe®️ 4.6 versionThe SAFe®️ principles have been updated with a redraft of Principle #3 — Assume variability and preserve optionsA new advanced topic article, Evolving Role of Managers describes the changes and ongoing responsibilities of line management in the new way of working.2) Team and Technical AgilityThe Team and Technical Agility competency describe the critical skills and Lean-Agile principles and practices that are required to produce the high-performing teams. These high-performing teams focus on creating high-quality, well-designed technical solutions in accordance with the current and future business needs.Team agility – enables high-performing organized Agile teams to operate with the fundamental and effective Agile principles and practices.Technical agility – provides Lean-Agile technical practices to generate high-quality, well-formulated technical solutions that contribute to the current and future business needs.Changes made in Team and Technical Agility in SAFe®️ 4.6 versionThe new built-in quality practices that ensure that each Solution element meets the appropriate quality standards at every increment. These new built-in quality practices define 5 dimensions that permit quality- flow, architecture and design quality, code quality, system quality, and release quality.The roles in the Agile teams- Product Owner, Scrum Master, and the Development team are updated to reflect the new guidelines and thinking from the Team and Technical Agility competency and their responsibilities in Behavior-Driven development (BDD).Behavior-Driven Development is a test-first, Agile software development approach that has evolved from the Test-Driven Development. BDD provides a built-in quality by defining system behavior.Test-Driven Development (TDD) is a practice for developing and executing the tests before implementing a code or system’s component.3) DevOps and Release on demandThe DevOps and Release on Demand competency confer how the DevOps principles and practices allow the organizations to release value (in full or in part), at any time to meet the customers’ needs. This new competency enhances the in-depth level of guidelines on implementing a full continuous delivery pipeline.Changes made in DevOps and Release on demand in SAFe®️ 4.6 versionThe advanced Continuous Delivery Pipeline includes mapping the current Delivery Pipeline and improving the flow with the DevOps and Release on-demand health radar.The DevOps health radar is a tool to assess the progress and improve a flow of the program value with the help of Continuous Delivery Pipeline. This tool consists of 16 sub-dimensions (as shown in the figure below) programs that are used to assess the program’s maturity. It helps to identify our health-related dimensions (e.g. sitting, crawling, walking, running, and identifying the places where we can improve).4) Business Solutions and Lean Systems EngineeringThe Business Solutions and Lean Systems Engineering competency show how organizations can develop large and complex solutions and cyber-physical systems using a Lean, Agile, and flow-based, value delivery-model. This model makes the best of the activities necessary to specify, design, construct, test, deploy, operate, evolve and ultimately decommission solutions.Changes made in Business Solutions and Lean Systems Engineering in SAFe®️ 4.6 versionIn this competency, they have changed the eight practices for developing large and complex solutions. Following image shows the practices included in the Business Solutions and Lean Systems Engineering.They made changes in the Economic Framework with the following four primary elements:Operating within Lean budgets and guardrailsUnderstanding solution economic trade-offsLeveraging SuppliersSequencing jobs for the maximum benefit (using WSJF)The advanced Roadmap section introduces the multiple planning horizons and the Solution Roadmap that provides a longer-term- multiyear view, showing the key milestones and deliverable s required to reach the solution Vision over time. The roadmap also contains new guidance on understanding and applying market rhythms and events.5) Lean Portfolio ManagementThe Lean Portfolio Management (LPM) competency describes how an organization can implement Lean approaches to strategy and investment funding, Agile portfolio operations, and Lean governance for a SAFe®️ portfolio.Changes made in Lean Portfolio Management (LPM) in SAFe®️ 4.6 versionIn SAFe®️ 4.6, the changes are made in the organizational strategy formulation, the definition of the portfolio, and strategic themes.New Portfolio Canvas describes how a portfolio of solutions creates, delivers and captures value for an enterprise. The portfolio canvas defines and aligns the value streams of the portfolio and the solutions to achieve the organizational goals and provides a process on meeting the vision of a future state.The updated Lean Budget Guardrails ensures the right investments within the portfolio’s budget.Also, the changes are made in the Lean Budgets that provides a guidance on moving from the traditional budgets to Lean budgets, guiding investments by the horizon and applying participatory budgeting.The updated Value Streams includes a section for defining the value streams and a revised Development Value Stream Canvas that aligns better with the new Portfolio Canvas.Top-Level Government in SAFe®️ 4.6Another updated thing in SAFe®️ 4.6 is the SAFe®️ for Government. The top-level Government in SAFe®️ 4.6 describes a set of success patterns that support the public sector organizations in implementing the Lean-Agile practices. The SAFe®️ for Government also serves as a landing page for applying SAFe®️ in the national, regional or local government context. This provides the specific guidelines to address the following things-Creating a basis of Lean-Agile values, principles, and practicesBuilding the high-performing teams of Government teams and contractorsAligning technology investments with agency strategyTransitioning from projects to a Lean flow of epicsAdopting Lean budgeting aligned to the value streamsApplying Lean estimating and forecasting in cadenceModifying acquisition practices to enable Lean-Agile development and operationsBuilding in quality and complianceAdapting governance practices to support agility and lean flow of valueThe passion of always improving the art of software development based on the Lean-Agile best practices makes Dean Leffingwell the world’s foremost authority. The release of the SAFe®️ 4.6 version is an update to the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe®️) which addresses the challenge of transitioning from the traditional model to the Lean-Agile Mindset. Moreover, the version provides the guidelines on XP, TDD, and BDD, and building a better Lean enterprise in the Lean way!You heard it right! Knowing the Lean fruits of SAFe®️ 4.6 to the organizations, KnowledgeHut is launching the course in the middle of November. Stay tuned to know more. Course arriving soon!
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SAFe®️ 4.6 - The Latest Entrant In SAFe®️ Series With 5 Core Competencies

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SAFe®️ 4.6 - The Latest Entrant In SAFe®️ Series With 5 Core Competencies

Scaled Agile Inc. (SAI) recently announced the latest version of SAFe®️, SAFe®️ 4.6 with the help of the whole Scaled Agile team and SAFe®️ Contributors. The SAFe®️ 4.6 version has underlined the introduction of ‘Five Core Competencies’ of the Lean Enterprise. The purpose behind incorporating those competencies is mainly to make the SAFe®️ organizations build a truly Lean Enterprise in a Lean fashion.  


According to the Gartner report, SAFe®️ 4.5 is delineated as the world’s most widely used Agile framework at the enterprise level.


This new way of working with SAFe®️ will open new avenues after the introduction of these competencies. At the same time, these competencies will become the primary lens for understanding and executing SAFe®️ in the organizations. Also, this new way of SAFe®️ working can make a big difference to the organizations that are struggling with their transformations.

Here are the names of the five competencies introduced newly to build a better Lean organization in a Lean way. Lean-Agile Leadership

  1.  Team and Technical Agility
  2.   DevOps and Release on demand
  3.   Business Solutions and Lean Systems Engineering
  4.   Lean Portfolio Management

Benefits of SAFe®️ 4.6 competencies

Having these five competencies allows organizations to-

  • Navigate digital disruptions
  • Respond to the volatile market conditions
  • Meeting the varying customer requirements and latest technologies

Let’s explore each competency in details below.
SAFE for learn Enterprises
1) Lean-Agile Leadership:

The Lean-Agile Leadership competency focuses on describing how the Lean-Agile leaders steer organizational change by encouraging the individuals and teams to reach their highest potential. The Lean-Agile leaders do this by learning, exhibiting, and coaching the Lean-Agile mindset, core values, principles, practices & features of SAFe®️.

Changes made in Lean-Agile Leadership in SAFe®️ 4.6 version

  • The SAFe®️ principles have been updated with a redraft of Principle #3 — Assume variability and preserve options
  • A new advanced topic article, Evolving Role of Managers describes the changes and ongoing responsibilities of line management in the new way of working.

2) Team and Technical Agility

The Team and Technical Agility competency describe the critical skills and Lean-Agile principles and practices that are required to produce the high-performing teams. These high-performing teams focus on creating high-quality, well-designed technical solutions in accordance with the current and future business needs.

  • Team agility – enables high-performing organized Agile teams to operate with the fundamental and effective Agile principles and practices.
  • Technical agility – provides Lean-Agile technical practices to generate high-quality, well-formulated technical solutions that contribute to the current and future business needs.

Changes made in Team and Technical Agility in SAFe®️ 4.6 version

  • The new built-in quality practices that ensure that each Solution element meets the appropriate quality standards at every increment. 
  • These new built-in quality practices define 5 dimensions that permit quality- flow, architecture and design quality, code quality, system quality, and release quality.
  • The roles in the Agile teams- Product Owner, Scrum Master, and the Development team are updated to reflect the new guidelines and thinking from the Team and Technical Agility competency and their responsibilities in Behavior-Driven development (BDD).
    • Behavior-Driven Development is a test-first, Agile software development approach that has evolved from the Test-Driven Development. BDD provides a built-in quality by defining system behavior.
  • Test-Driven Development (TDD) is a practice for developing and executing the tests before implementing a code or system’s component.

3) DevOps and Release on demand

The DevOps and Release on Demand competency confer how the DevOps principles and practices allow the organizations to release value (in full or in part), at any time to meet the customers’ needs. This new competency enhances the in-depth level of guidelines on implementing a full continuous delivery pipeline.

Changes made in DevOps and Release on demand in SAFe®️ 4.6 version

The advanced Continuous Delivery Pipeline includes mapping the current Delivery Pipeline and improving the flow with the DevOps and Release on-demand health radar.

  • The DevOps health radar is a tool to assess the progress and improve a flow of the program value with the help of Continuous Delivery Pipeline. This tool consists of 16 sub-dimensions (as shown in the figure below) programs that are used to assess the program’s maturity. It helps to identify our health-related dimensions (e.g. sitting, crawling, walking, running, and identifying the places where we can improve).

Devops And Release on Demand4) Business Solutions and Lean Systems Engineering

The Business Solutions and Lean Systems Engineering competency show how organizations can develop large and complex solutions and cyber-physical systems using a Lean, Agile, and flow-based, value delivery-model. This model makes the best of the activities necessary to specify, design, construct, test, deploy, operate, evolve and ultimately decommission solutions.

Changes made in Business Solutions and Lean Systems Engineering in SAFe®️ 4.6 version

  • In this competency, they have changed the eight practices for developing large and complex solutions. Following image shows the practices included in the Business Solutions and Lean Systems Engineering.
    Changes made in Business Solutions and Lean Systems Engineering in SAFe®️ 4.6 version
  • They made changes in the Economic Framework with the following four primary elements:
    • Operating within Lean budgets and guardrails
    • Understanding solution economic trade-offs
    • Leveraging Suppliers
    • Sequencing jobs for the maximum benefit (using WSJF)

  • The advanced Roadmap section introduces the multiple planning horizons and the Solution Roadmap that provides a longer-term- multiyear view, showing the key milestones and deliverable s required to reach the solution Vision over time. The roadmap also contains new guidance on understanding and applying market rhythms and events.

5) Lean Portfolio Management

The Lean Portfolio Management (LPM) competency describes how an organization can implement Lean approaches to strategy and investment funding, Agile portfolio operations, and Lean governance for a SAFe®️ portfolio.

Changes made in Lean Portfolio Management (LPM) in SAFe®️ 4.6 version

  • In SAFe®️ 4.6, the changes are made in the organizational strategy formulation, the definition of the portfolio, and strategic themes.
  • New Portfolio Canvas describes how a portfolio of solutions creates, delivers and captures value for an enterprise. The portfolio canvas defines and aligns the value streams of the portfolio and the solutions to achieve the organizational goals and provides a process on meeting the vision of a future state.
  • The updated Lean Budget Guardrails ensures the right investments within the portfolio’s budget.
  • Also, the changes are made in the Lean Budgets that provides a guidance on moving from the traditional budgets to Lean budgets, guiding investments by the horizon and applying participatory budgeting.
  • The updated Value Streams includes a section for defining the value streams and a revised Development Value Stream Canvas that aligns better with the new Portfolio Canvas.

Top-Level Government in SAFe®️ 4.6
Another updated thing in SAFe®️ 4.6 is the SAFe®️ for Government. The top-level Government in SAFe®️ 4.6 describes a set of success patterns that support the public sector organizations in implementing the Lean-Agile practices. The SAFe®️ for Government also serves as a landing page for applying SAFe®️ in the national, regional or local government context. This provides the specific guidelines to address the following things-

  • Creating a basis of Lean-Agile values, principles, and practices
  • Building the high-performing teams of Government teams and contractors
  • Aligning technology investments with agency strategy
  • Transitioning from projects to a Lean flow of epics
  • Adopting Lean budgeting aligned to the value streams
  • Applying Lean estimating and forecasting in cadence
  • Modifying acquisition practices to enable Lean-Agile development and operations
  • Building in quality and compliance
  • Adapting governance practices to support agility and lean flow of value

The passion of always improving the art of software development based on the Lean-Agile best practices makes Dean Leffingwell the world’s foremost authority. The release of the SAFe®️ 4.6 version is an update to the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe®️) which addresses the challenge of transitioning from the traditional model to the Lean-Agile Mindset. Moreover, the version provides the guidelines on XP, TDD, and BDD, and building a better Lean enterprise in the Lean way!

You heard it right! Knowing the Lean fruits of SAFe®️ 4.6 to the organizations, KnowledgeHut is launching the course in the middle of November. 

Stay tuned to know more. Course arriving soon!

KnowledgeHut

KnowledgeHut Editor

Author

KnowledgeHut is a fast growing Management Consulting and Training firm that is a source of Intelligent Information support for businesses and professionals across the globe.


Website : http://www.knowledgehut.com/

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Incomplete Stories & Tasks in an Agile Sprint

Have you ever encountered a situation such as above? I am sure you have and I am sure that you experience this often. So, how do you deal with it? Does the managers in your company make a big issue out of it? Is it a situation probed intensely by the product owner and even the Scrum Master who is the team’s protector? You need not worry. Below is a discussion on incomplete sprints, better known as ‘Spillovers’, and on how to best deal with them. Spillovers & DoD – The definition Simply put, a spillover is a backlog item that has failed to meet the criteria defined in the Definition of Done (DoD) for the project team. It is important to note that the DoD is defined for the entire project and is applicable for any user story. For example a team may decide that the DoD for a user story is for it to be elicited, groomed, analyzed, designed, UI / UX designed, coded, unit tested, functionality tested, integrated and regression tested. Any story not ticking all these boxes may be marked as not done. Well, not always!! The team may decide that some of these criteria is not applicable for certain stories during sprint planning and those should be evaluated accordingly. Trouble with Spillovers? Spillovers normally surface during Sprint Demo & Retrospective meetings and often give trouble to Scrum team members and product owners during sprint planning. It is the responsibility of the PO to mark a user story as done by going through the DoD criteria. Then only should the story be moved to the ‘Done’ column on your JIRA board. Sometimes the POs end up scratching their heads as a result of poorly defined DoD’s or just pass stories on to Done state just ensure progress. Similarly, during planning teams end up spending a lot of time discussing about these spillover stories and do extensive planning for these unfinished user stories. Spillovers are common phenomena for any agile team. But it is important to analyze the root causes for these spillovers if this happens often.  Common reasons for spillovers Below are some common root causes for unfinished work- Problems with DoD – The DoD was not accurately defined, and you find that out later in the sprint. This results in the argument around marking the story as ‘done’. Overestimation of work for the sprint – The team becomes over ambitious and commits to much more than they can handle. Larger chunks of work eating up on time of other stories. – This is actually not a big issue. Story point estimation is a relative estimation and has no link to time needed in hours. Hence, this overrun of time may happen often. Unforeseen scenarios– There may be situations where a team member becomes unavailable due to sickness, other work commitment or personal commitments. Other situations related to team members not be able to access code repositories due to various environmental elements may also cause delays. Change in priorities – PO may decide to change priority of stories mid sprint or stories may even become higher priority with technical limitations. As a result, stories may not be completed and may get spilled over to subsequent sprints. Dealing with spillovers So it is important to devise strategies on how to manage such unfinished work. Below are some recommendations on how to do so. Again, this is not rocket science but the application of some common sense to make things work. It is important to review the process followed by the team during the sprint retrospective session. This session can be used to identify the root cause for spillovers and to discuss options available to mitigate it. It is important to note that the cause for most delays may be common and thus the team must understand the factors related to delivery delays to quickly move on to discuss other aspects important for project success. The team must discuss on the future of the user story that got spilt over. The PO must decide whether the story is still on high priority or not.  If yes, then simply move the story forward to the next sprint. You have already decomposed the story to the most granular level during grooming and it is just a matter of getting it done. Again, if the story was done partially it is important for the team to discuss the amount of work remaining to mark the story as done. This analysis may actually result in the creation of a new user story with a new acceptance criteria, a completely new DoD and a brand new estimation. If not on priority, simply move the story to the bottom of the product backlog. The story will get evaluated for priority during backlog grooming and be moved up or down the backlog as relevant. I previously wrote an article on capacity planning for agile teams. It makes sense for the Scrum Master to understand the availability of the team for the entire duration of the sprint and plan the amount of work that can be taken up accordingly. For more information on capacity planning and how it may help avoid spillovers refer here Some more logical things to do is to dedicate more time for planning. This may be done by defining a proper goal for the sprint and to ensure that all user stories are aligned with this particular sprint goal. The scrum team may also set aside some buffer time for unplanned work which will give the team some breathing space just in case a story runs for more than planned. So in conclusion, spillovers are to be managed properly. You may never be able to completely eliminate it from your projects. But with proper management and planning, you can reduce the number of times it may occur and be able to reduce its impact.  
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The Anti-patterns To Look Out For In The Daily Routine Of A Scrum Master

Scrum Master (SM) plays a very critical role in the success of Agile/Scrum implementations in an organization. The entire effort of transforming teams with Agile ways of working is bound to fail if the role of a Scrum Master is not understood clearly. Listed below are some of the anti-patterns seen in a Scrum Masters-  Unable to coach the Product Owner Scrum Master with Command and Control Leadership Style  Scrum Master taking updates from the development team during Daily-Standup as opposed to the actual purpose of Daily-Standup Allowing the spillover of work to subsequent sprints Taking partial credit for the unfinished work in the current sprint by splitting story points Allowing for burn out of Development Team Playing the role of Scrum Master without believing in Agile/Scrum values and principles Always conducting Sprint retrospective in the same fashion  Playing the role of SM without understanding the behavioural aspects needed to play the role Solving all impediments for the team Demonstrating the working software during Sprint Review to the stakeholders. Not creating awareness in the team with Agile Engineering Practices Not following Timebox Allowing Managers to attend Sprint Retrospectives Assigning tasks to Dev team members Trying to  influence the team estimates Forcing team to commit for Sprint deliverables SM doing planning for the team instead of facilitating Playing favourites, showing differences and bias among dev team members. Being authoritative Lack of knowledge on implementation of Agile/Scrum Providing solutions for the team Allowing dev team members to work on items other than what has been committed during the Sprint Planning. 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Therefore, the Scrum meeting is always planned according to a suitability of all the team members. A common concern behind engaging all the team members in the meeting is to plan the process in the project for the future steps and discussion on the desired output.  Comprehending the team development:  As per the renowned psychologist Bruce Tuckman, there exist diverse stages of a team development- forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning. A Scrum Master is great when he/she comprehends under which phase the team is suffering and when he/she knows the importance of a stable team composition clearly. Understands principles are more crucial than practices: Basically, without the concrete understanding of the principles, every executed Agile practice is worthless. 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In fact, you can say that the SM’s role has changed as a periodical mentor and advisor to a daily coach and teacher.   Not preventing the team occasionally: A great Scrum Master has an idea of when to save a team from falling and failing. But sometimes, the SM lets the team fail, as the lessons can be learned better after a mistake. Encourages ownership: A great Scrum Master motivates his team to assume complete ownership of the tasks they are mapped to.  Should be self-organizing: The great Scrum Master comprehends the importance of a self-organizing team. They should be able to make their own decisions, manage own work, cooperate team members to achieve project target. Knows the power of silence: A great Scrum Master is always aware of the three levels of listening-  Level 1- internal listening Level 2- focussed listening Level 3- global listening   A great Scrum Master does not simply hear, he listens   A great Scrum Master is also a great listener. Less talking and more listening is something he follows on a regular basis. He is aware of all the three levels of listening and knows how to to make the best use of them. He listens carefully to what is said, and also to what isn't said.    Notices: The daily Scrum is arranged by the team for the team. The Scrum Master just observes that session and keeps a water clear view of what is being discussed, how and what the team members played the role in the session. Shares experiences: One of the unique traits of successful Scrum Masters is that they always share experiences and relevant information with their peers. This might either be intra-organizational or through seminars and conferences, which are great platforms to share experiences and garner knowledge. Undoubtedly, noting down and sharing the lessons learned is also highly commendable on the part of an SM.  Has a knapsack loaded with numerous retrospective designs: A great Scrum Master can apply numerous retrospective designs. This makes sure that the retrospective will be a leisure and functional for the team. A Scrum Master has an idea of which retrospective to refer to according to the team’s situation. Also, the SM allows the team to host their own retrospective.    Can guide professionally: An efficient Scrum Master comprehends the energy of expert training and has aced at this area of study. Books like Coaching Agile Teams and Co-Active Coaching don't have any privileged insights for Scrum Masters. He/she knows how to direct without recommending. He/she can close the vacant space between considering doing and really doing. Also, he/she enables the team members to comprehend themselves better so they can find out new approaches to benefit as much as possible from their potential. Has influence at an organizational level: A successful Scrum Master always motivates and influences team members at tactic and strategic level. Mostly, team members face difficulties at these levels. It is important that a Scrum Master knows how to act at the different levels within an organization.  Prevent impediments: A great Scrum Master resolves and also prevents the impediments for future. Based on his/her past experiences, the SM reads the situations and acts on them proactively.  Always available: An extraordinary Scrum Master isn't generally effectively present. He doesn't irritate the team unnecessarily and helps the team to get into the 'flow'. However, when the team needs him, he's constantly accessible. Forms an incredible pair with the Product Owner: An incredible Scrum Master has a remarkable pairing with the Product Owner. In spite of the fact that their advantages are to some degree extraordinary, the Product Owner 'pushes' the team while the Scrum Master secures them. This strong partnership is to a great degree significant for the Development Team. Together they can fabricate the establishment for outstanding outcomes. Allows leadership to grow: A great Scrum Master allows leadership within the team to develop and views this as a successful outcome of their teaching. They believe in the mantra "leadership isn't just a title, it's an attitude". This is something every single member of a Scrum team should maintain.  Knows about gamification: An incredible Scrum Master can utilize the ideas of game and consider game mechanics to connect with clients in taking care of issues and stick to the commitments made to the clients.  Comprehends more knowledge on Scrum related things: An incredible Scrum Master is likewise skillful with XP, Kanban, and Lean. He knows the qualities, shortcomings, openings, and risks of each technique/framework and how and when to utilize them. He tries to comprehend what a team needs to accomplish and causes them to turn out to be more viable from an Agile viewpoint. Leads by example: A great Scrum Master is somebody that team members need to take after. He/she does this by motivating them to release their inner potential and demonstrating to them the desired behavior. At troublesome circumstances, he/she demonstrates industry standards to the team members to follow up on it; he/she doesn't freeze, remains quiet and enables the group to discover the arrangement.    A good leader tells, a great leader leads, a Scrum Master sets examples Is a conceived facilitator: An incredible Scrum Master is a facilitator by nature. All the Scrum events are a delight to attend, and every other meeting is very much arranged, valuable and fun, and has a reasonable result and purpose.   Concluding Thoughts: There are a lot of conceivable outcomes to failing as a Scrum Master. Sometimes, the absence of an organizational support, unfair people for unsuitable job, people conflicting with their team members over trivial issues are some of the common instances. Some Scrum Masters basically need criticism from their Scrum teams and stakeholders. Whatever be the case, try and give credit to your Scrum Master for the times he has stood by his team. After all, Scrum, in the end, is a group activity.  
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Scrum Master (SM) plays a very critical role in th... Read More

What Are The Most Valuable Kanban Certifications?

Certifications have become the hot topic of discussion for the past few years as they are often used to show the extent of knowledge or training that job applicants have. More and more employers are interested in attracting certified professionals to the organisation as they are expected to be more efficient and skilled workers. This is where the viability of Kanban certifications comes into the picture. This approach is centred on the use of visual cues where the visual cards represent a step or task in a process that is interconnected to the next step or task leading up to completion. This visual representation of the interconnected tasks aid the teams in understanding the required workflow, resolving any blocks along the way, and improving the service that is provided. Out of the available certifications, four stand out as being most prominently wanted by the employers, namely,Accredited Kanban Trainer (AKT) certificationTeam Kanban Practitioner (TKP) certificationKanban Management Professional (KMP) certificationKanban Coaching Professional (KCP) certificationSource: https://edu.leankanban.com/lku-roadmapAccredited Kanban Trainer (AKT) certificationThis is the certification that gets you ready for providing certified Kanban training classes using the appropriate training materials for the course. AKT certified professionals are the ones who have completed the training course with application review and case study requirements. These trainers are generally attached to specific Kanban training organizations and are commissioned to teach a certain number of students each year. AKTs also offer private Kanban classes to the clients.Many accredited AKT certified individuals also take up jobs in other capacities within the organization. The employers are interested to hire such individuals in the team as they might come in aid when the organizations decide to carry out a Kanban training for the other employees at a later date. The following are the principal reasons behind this highly valued certification.The ability to deeply understand and impart knowledge about the Kanban methods in practice.Adeptness at handling all the major types of Kanban systems and knowing the appropriateness of each system.A higher number of job avenues as the individual is qualified to work both as a trainer with an organization and as a project manager.In the highly competitive business environ, an AKT professional is hired to empower the teams to make them reach the finish life faster.Team Kanban Practitioner (TKP) certificationThis certification is needed when you want to get the team working under your control with an improved level of collaboration and efficiency. Generally, all experience levels are welcomed for getting TKP certified, and there are no requirements for prior experience or training. The best individuals to attend to this certification course are the managers and Team members who want to get started by understanding the key concepts of Kanban. There are four significant objectives to getting this training:Getting the workload organized enough to be handled with greater ease leading to faster completion.Improving visibility of the goals and the pathway of attainment of the aims and objectives.Facilitating better communication within the various levels of the team.Greater ability to manage the unforeseen and calculated risks leading to higher efficiency in management.A higher degree of collaboration within the team among both the new members and the existing participants leading to better ability at velocity estimation.Kanban Management Professional (KMP) certificationThe KMP certification is probably most known and popular among the Kanban certifications. A Kanban management professional understands how to take better decisions leading to streamlining of the workflows. The end results to aid the company in the form of improved service delivery for the company and benefit the clients in the form of greater customer satisfaction. KMPs have special training in the application of the Kanban Method for greater agility and better risk management. The value of the Kanban Management Professional (KMP) certification lies in the following pointers.The versatility factor of the KMP certification makes it easy for the project managers to move seamlessly across functions. For instance, movement of a content project from editing to the graphic designing aspect, or the transition of new software from integration to testing.The KMP certified professionals are also adept at meeting inventory with the demand factor by kick-starting processes into gear at the time when inventory is really low. The result is just-in-time delivery and greater levels of responsiveness.KMPs are instrumental in encouraging teams to limit the extent of work they have going at any point in time through a process known as limiting the work in progress. This factor encourages the teams to move towards the finishing point together by means of eliminating distractions leading to enhanced collaboration.Kanban Coaching Professional (KCP) certificationKanban Coaching Professional (KCP) certification is the highest position attained by a Kanban coach. This is the certification that evaluates the existing formal training, knowledge, and experience of the professionals who are involved in the coaching of the Kanban initiatives. KCPs are held as the most skilled professionals to lead the initiative of change towards the Kanban methods for an organization. The eligible candidates for KCP are Kanban practitioners, trainers, consultants, change agents, and managers. The key points of value to this highly in-demand certification include the following.The Kanban community recommends knowledge about the application of wide-ranging Kanban techniques.Access to the private forums of collaboration which are only reserved for the KCP professionals.Communication with the clients and coaches about advanced techniques and processes of the relevant Kanban methods.Apart from the other requirements, this is one of the basic eligibility if you wish to attend Enterprise Services Planning Training.Attaining a higher level of expertise in the Kanban methodology if you wish to continue as a Kanban trainer.Since Kanban is an alternative method to approach the Agile processes, the framework is highly efficient in catalyzing ongoing improvements and leading to higher effectiveness of the work. Kanban assimilates well with other approaches like Scrum and the traditional methods which is one of the major factors adding value to the Kanban certified professionals.
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What Are The Most Valuable Kanban Certifications?

Certifications have become the hot topic of discus... Read More