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Does The Lack Of Knowledge Sharing Affect Your Scrum Productivity?

Knowledge sharing is the biggest advantage of working in a group or as a team. The proper utilization of knowledge of every team member contributes to successful project delivery. However, a number of organizations have experienced major setbacks just because of not detecting and resolving the issue of ‘lack of knowledge sharing’ on time. In a Scrum – Agile organization, knowledge sharing becomes more important because Scrum, an Agile framework, is designed to complete the software development project through the collective efforts of the team.   Knowledge Sharing Barriers –You May Not Know:  To deal with the issue effectively, we can divide the commonly identified knowledge barriers into three categories:  1. Individual Knowledge Sharing Barriers: Low awareness about the benefits of knowledge sharing with others. Insufficient evaluation, feedback & communication. Lack of interaction between the team members 2. Organisational Knowledge Sharing Barriers: Lack of managerial direction for clear communication  Inadequate spaces, resources and time to share and gain new knowledge Lack of transparency in recognition of performance  3. Technological Knowledge Sharing Barriers Improper integration of IT systems & processes Frequent obstructions to communication flows lack of compatibility between working process, project planning, execution and management    Reluctance to use the latest technology due to lack of training  Scrum helps teams deliver products with constant adaptation & improvement. A social entertainment and gaming company also reported a 73% gain in productivity.#agile #scrum #game #gaming #entertainment #tech #technology #software #adapt #adaptation #productivity #improvement pic.twitter.com/OjKsMutKR1 — Exceptional_LLC (@Exceptional_LLC) May 6, 2018 Negative Impacts of Knowledge Sharing Barriers on Scrum Productivity: A number of times the well-maintained velocity of Scrum projects takes a big hit when a star performer resigns all of sudden. The best you can do is to extract the maximum knowledge out of him during his stay period and to share the gathered information to another team member; it slows down the project besides developing uncertainties in the minds of your Scrum team members.   The numbers of Scrum team members are questioned when an employee quits.Many a time, this questioning negatively affect their productivity and commitment both.  The very common silo in Scrum Project Management you experience is when a newcomer joins your team and the team members are asked to pull that new member up to the required velocity.   Many times, Scrum team responds to changes to deliver the best but few members still don’t believe in comprehensive documentation; it creates the dependency on each other.  In the absence of proper training and commonly accepted Agile – Scrum culture, primarily focused on knowledge sharing, most of the projects run at a low velocity.  Lack of knowledge sharing is the major cause of reworking that increases the delivery period and the cost as well.  Effective knowledge sharing, essentially is the key to building self-organizing Agile teams. This is best described in the following video-   5 ways to Improve Knowledge Sharing for Better Scrum Productivity:  The proper flow of knowledge sharing within Scrum team dramatically improves the productivity with quality. Scrum Master indeed is a manager as he/she manages the process of exchanging information. There is a lot of knowledge in the Scrum team members; and, getting it out on time for the people who need it is a challenge for Scrum leaders. The following 5 hacks will surely help you improve knowledge sharing:  Store the Documents for Anytime Usage:  Document all the knowledge and put it safely in an easy-to-access repository. The scope of this tactic covers the project relevant data of all the laptops and tablets also.           2. Conduct Demo meetings Within Team Or With Client: While preparing yourself for the demo meeting, you will need the documents to show the development; as a result, all the shared information will be available to you and for all.           ​3. Pair Programming:  The idea behind ‘Pair Programming’ is to assign a particular code work to two  programmers at the same time to prevent knowledge silos and to encourage transparency as well. It also helps both the developers to improve the quality by going through the ideas of each other. In addition, it takes care of ‘surprise resigning’.         4. Motivate Scrum Team Members:  Most of the people don’t want to share their knowledge unless they expect something in return; therefore, Scrum members need motivational support by extrinsic and intrinsic rewards.          5. Go for Extreme Programming (XP)     Extreme Programming (XP) is an Agile framework powered by the practical values of courage, communication, feedback, simplicity, respect. Make it a part of your Scrum strategy.   Conclusion:  The zero-gap knowledge sharing through the fastest route is the key to success in Scrum projects. It is also true that one roadmap doesn’t take everyone to the desired destination but the strategy with clear vision and goal matters; and, same is the case with knowledge sharing in Scrum. The ‘Professional Scrum Product Owner (PSPO)’ and ‘ScrumMaster (CSM) Certification Trainings’ help you deliver the best quality product at the earliest through strategic knowledge sharing system.
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Does The Lack Of Knowledge Sharing Affect Your Scrum Productivity?

203
Does The Lack Of Knowledge Sharing Affect Your Scrum Productivity?

Knowledge sharing is the biggest advantage of working in a group or as a team. The proper utilization of knowledge of every team member contributes to successful project delivery. However, a number of organizations have experienced major setbacks just because of not detecting and resolving the issue of ‘lack of knowledge sharing’ on time. In a Scrum – Agile organization, knowledge sharing becomes more important because Scrum, an Agile framework, is designed to complete the software development project through the collective efforts of the team.  


Knowledge Sharing Barriers –You May Not Know: 

To deal with the issue effectively, we can divide the commonly identified knowledge barriers into three categories: 

Knowledge sharing barriers


1. Individual Knowledge Sharing Barriers:

  • Low awareness about the benefits of knowledge sharing with others.
  • Insufficient evaluation, feedback & communication.
  • Lack of interaction between the team members

2. Organisational Knowledge Sharing Barriers:

  • Lack of managerial direction for clear communication 
  • Inadequate spaces, resources and time to share and gain new knowledge
  • Lack of transparency in recognition of performance 

3. Technological Knowledge Sharing Barriers

  • Improper integration of IT systems & processes
  • Frequent obstructions to communication flows
  • lack of compatibility between working process, project planning, execution and management   
  • Reluctance to use the latest technology due to lack of training 


Negative Impacts of Knowledge Sharing Barriers on Scrum Productivity:

A number of times the well-maintained velocity of Scrum projects takes a big hit when a star performer resigns all of sudden. The best you can do is to extract the maximum knowledge out of him during his stay period and to share the gathered information to another team member; it slows down the project besides developing uncertainties in the minds of your Scrum team members.  

The numbers of Scrum team members are questioned when an employee quits.Many a time, this questioning negatively affect their productivity and commitment both. 

The very common silo in Scrum Project Management you experience is when a newcomer joins your team and the team members are asked to pull that new member up to the required velocity.  

Many times, Scrum team responds to changes to deliver the best but few members still don’t believe in comprehensive documentation; it creates the dependency on each other. 


In the absence of proper training and commonly accepted Agile – Scrum culture, primarily focused on knowledge sharing, most of the projects run at a low velocity. 

Lack of knowledge sharing is the major cause of reworking that increases the delivery period and the cost as well. 

Effective knowledge sharing, essentially is the key to building self-organizing Agile teams. This is best described in the following video-

 


5 ways to Improve Knowledge Sharing for Better Scrum Productivity: 

The proper flow of knowledge sharing within Scrum team dramatically improves the productivity with quality. Scrum Master indeed is a manager as he/she manages the process of exchanging information. There is a lot of knowledge in the Scrum team members; and, getting it out on time for the people who need it is a challenge for Scrum leaders. The following 5 hacks will surely help you improve knowledge sharing: 

  1. Store the Documents for Anytime Usage: 

Document all the knowledge and put it safely in an easy-to-access repository. The scope of this tactic covers the project relevant data of all the laptops and tablets also.  

        2. Conduct Demo meetings Within Team Or With Client:

While preparing yourself for the demo meeting, you will need the documents to show the development; as a result, all the shared information will be available to you and for all.  

        ​3. Pair Programming: 
The idea behind ‘Pair Programming’ is to assign a particular code work to two  programmers at the same time to prevent knowledge silos and to encourage transparency as well. It also helps both the developers to improve the quality by going through the ideas of each other. In addition, it takes care of ‘surprise resigning’.

Communication Effectiveness chart

        4. Motivate Scrum Team Members: 
Most of the people don’t want to share their knowledge unless they expect something in return; therefore, Scrum members need motivational support by extrinsic and intrinsic rewards. 

        5. Go for Extreme Programming (XP)    
Extreme Programming (XP) is an Agile framework powered by the practical values of courage, communication, feedback, simplicity, respect. Make it a part of your Scrum strategy.  

Conclusion

The zero-gap knowledge sharing through the fastest route is the key to success in Scrum projects. It is also true that one roadmap doesn’t take everyone to the desired destination but the strategy with clear vision and goal matters; and, same is the case with knowledge sharing in Scrum. The ‘Professional Scrum Product Owner (PSPO)’ and ‘ScrumMaster (CSM) Certification Trainings’ help you deliver the best quality product at the earliest through strategic knowledge sharing system.

Shubhranshu

Shubhranshu Agarwal

Blog Author

Shubhranshu Agarwal is a technical writer with special interest in business management and project management subjects. Over the 15 years of freelance content writing, he has written a lot to help the industries, businesses and project managers to achieve the sustainable growth by implementing strategic critical management methodologies.
 

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Agile Project Management Vs. Traditional Project Management

In this fast-moving world, project management has become one of the most important pillars that are helping businesses run without any glitch in their processes. Both small and large scale organizations around the world are exploiting technology and depending on project management systems to deliver the software development project successfully. Whether it is team workflow management or timing, these tools help to ensure that everything is going well without any obstacles. While there are tens of different project management approaches, Agile is considered one of the most practical and flexible software development mechanism that exist today. It is capable of executing a variety of tasks, but what sets it apart from others? Let’s find it out. Here’s a brief comparison of Agile management and traditional project management software:                                                                                                                    Traditional vs Agile Project Management Overview of Agile and Traditional Project Management What is Traditional Project Management? The traditional Project Management (waterfall) approach is linear where all the phases of a process occur in sequence. Its concept depends on predictable tools and predictable experience. Each and every project follows the same life cycle which includes the stages such as feasibility, plan, design, build, test, production, support, as shown in the figure above. The entire project is planned upfront without any scope for changing requirements. This approach assumes that time and cost are variables and requirements are fixed. This is the reason why traditional project management faces budget and timeline issues. What is Agile Project Management? When a traditional system focuses on upfront planning where factors like cost, scope, and time are given importance, Agile management gives prominence to teamwork, customer collaboration, and flexibility. It is an iterative approach that focuses more on incorporating customer feedback and continuous releases with every iteration of software development project. The basic concept behind Agile software development is that it delves into evolving changes and collaborative effort to bring out results rather than a predefined process. Adaptive planning is perhaps the biggest feature of Agile and one that makes it a crowd favorite among project managers. Scrum and Kanban are two of the most widely used Agile frameworks. They are very well known for encouraging decision-making and preventing time consumption on variables that are bound to change. It stresses customer satisfaction and uses available teams to fast-track software development at every stage. The table below shows the major differences between Agile project management and traditional project management.                                                                                Table: Agile project management vs traditional project management Why is Agile Preferred and why not the traditional project management? Agile is preferred by most developers and managers because of a variety of reasons. Let’s have a look at the most common ones: Project complexity Traditional: This method is the best fit for small or less complex projects as it follows linear approach. Sudden changes in the project or any other complexities can block the entire process and make the team go back to step one and start all over again. Agile: This is the best methodology to follow in case of complex projects. A complex project may have various interconnected phases and each stage may be dependent on many others rather than a single one as in simple projects. So, Agile methods are preferred for large complex projects, as they can respond better to such structures. Adaptability Traditional: This approach works with a belief that once a phase is done, it will not be reviewed again. So, it is not adaptable to rapid changes in the work plan. In case if any sudden situation arises or any change in the requirements from the client’s side, traditional approach fails to adapt to the new change. The only choice is to start from the very beginning once again. This wastes a lot of effort and time in the process. Agile: The adaptability factor is very high in this methodology since it is not linear. Complex projects consist of several interconnected stages, where a change in one stage can cause an effect on another. And the project managers can take calculated risks in such scenario, as there is a chance of high adaptability.  Scope for feedback and changes Traditional Each and every process is clearly detailed and defined at the start of the project in the traditional approach. It cannot deal with any big change or feedback that might require a change in the process. Mostly, the project delivery time and budget are fixed, allows change very rarely. Agile There is a high acceptance for feedback and change in this method. The process is very flexible and allows constant feedback that can help to provide better output within the fixed project delivery time. The main reason that managers or developers choose agile direction is for the flexibility it offers. Developers working with Agile management are able to respond to customer requests quickly as they are only addressing small parts of the project at a time and the customer validates each iteration or sprint before finalizing. Some of the important characteristics of Agile development Breaks project into parts Agile divides a project into parts (called iterations) where the release is sent to the customer after every single iteration. Additionally, the success of the project can be easily foreseen through the success of these iterations. This removes the need for upfront planning completely. Self-organized As mentioned above, Agile uses a parallel mode of management. Employees of a company are not managed by a central line of control, but by groups. For example, in Agile, there may be eight teams working on a single project. Each team is managed by itself without external guidance. The teams only interact with each other for project discussion and process linking as they are otherwise not self-sufficient. Generally speaking, an Agile project consists of three parts: The product owner – the expert on the project (for which the product is being developed) and is the main person who oversees the projects The scrum master – this person manages the process involved in Agile. He/she looks after the iterations and its completion The team – individuals who play significant and minor roles in the software development process Customer Engagement In Agile, customer engagement is at the very top. The customer is regarded highly in its frameworks as after every iteration, feedback is generated and acted upon. Overall, Agile is clearly the winner among project management systems. When compared with other traditional approaches, Agile’s features come to the fore and reiterate why it is one of the top software used by companies globally. Can Agile Coexist with Other Approaches? This is a question asked by many project managers, and opinions of experts seem to be divided. While some say it is possible for Agile to coexist with traditional project management systems, they suggest being cautious and using them for different terms. For example, using two different approaches on the same project can be counter-productive and highly explosive. As Agile and most other frameworks are totally contrasting to each other, the projects may go for a toss. On the other hand, some experts believe that it is not possible for Agile and other tools to co-exist because of their contrast. Using them together can cause disorder in the entire company system, making the productivity to go for a toss. Agile vs Traditional- Adoption Growth According to a recent online survey of 601 IT and development professionals, it is proved that Agile is the new typical formula for project success. The majority of projects and development teams are now adopting this methodology, while the traditional waterfall approaches have many flaws.    Traditional organizations vs. #Agile organizations #SALC16 pic.twitter.com/bBgxkQB1fI — Scrum Alliance (@ScrumAlliance) January 20, 2016 Agile was first introduced about 15 years ago as a substitute for traditional software development approaches. Many people considered it as challenging to implement traditional approach practices and Agile adopters stated that this new style of software development improves team collaboration and is more customer-centric.  Though Agile method was present more than a decade ago, the vast majority of organizations have adopted the practice in the last 5 years. Moreover, the survey reported that agile adoption saw an inflection point between the year 2009-2010. 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As we can see, Agile project management is really in-demand for teams. It helps the team to work on the top priority ones at the right time and allows them to walk through the risks much faster than they would with traditional project management tools.  
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Let’s look at the major differences between the PM and SM: Project Manager(PM) vs.Scrum Master(SM) Goals Has defined goals like- Completing the project on time, planned budget, and scope Makes sure that the team members are well trained to follow Agile practices appropriately. Also, SM coaches the Scrum teams and mentions the timeline to finish the project. Quality Assurance PM also knows the importance of quality, but doesn’t know how to achieve this. Usually, a consultant is hired to fix the errors. SM assures the quality and very well knows the importance of it. Team Size Project Managers like to make the things large. PM works with more people and a huge budget. In this way, they improve to Program Manager Scrum Master always tries to keep things smaller. They like to work in small teams irrespective of budget. Average Salary Rs.1,351,403 per year Rs 1,036,017 per year Job Description The job description of the Project Manager includes- Planning, creating budget and the related documents PM has to work with upper management to ensure a scope and direction of a project PM has to work with another department also, in case of emergency sometimes have to work themselves or instruct the team to finish a goal. The job description for Scrum Master includes- Resolves barriers and controls the Scrum processes. 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Eventually, the role of a Scrum Master is proved as a ‘deciding factor’ of the successful projects. The Scrum Master and the Project Manager both have distinct roles. Both need particular skill-sets and a right person to make the work happen.       
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