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Steps to Add React to a Website

React allows you to quickly develop complex user interfaces and web applications by breaking them down into simple and manageable components. Tailormade for today’s ever-evolving world, React JS is one of the most sought-after web frameworks among industries and is a key component of their growth.  Note: This article is purely for beginners and hence the following process is NOT recommended for production sites. However, this will allow the reader to get a taste of React without delving into toolchains and complicated processes.  So, let’s get started. All of you are already aware of ReactJs, designed by Facebook, which is a popular open-source JavaScript library. It is used for writing rich and engaging frontend abstractions in fewer lines of code within a short time. One of the reasons why React is so popular is because of its rendering performance.  In this post, we will learn how to add React JS to our current website. This article will pave the way for you to quickly start coding with React JS or simply import React in your existing project. No, it’s not rocket science! You can simply add it in your html file, that too in 1 minute!  What, just 1 minute? As in, 60 seconds…..? Read on to know more! Add React in One Minute An essential simple website consists of 3 files: Html file Js file, and CSS file   React JS can be used in a normal index.html file with no npm or web-packs. Hard to believe?  Steps to Add ReactJs to an existing website:  Let’s not waste any more time and start editing our existing HTML page, which is called index.html. There is no requirement of any external libraries or any other tool, just a code editor, website folder holding all the above files and Internet Connection.  Step:1 Open the HTML file you want to edit and add a div on which you want to add the React implementation. For instance: (index.html) looks like this, see line number 12-13<!DOCTYPE html> <html>   <head>     <meta charset="UTF-8" />     <title>Steps To Add React to a Website </title>   </head>   <body>       <h2>Steps To Add React to a Website </h2>       <!-- We will put our React component inside this div. → Line 12     <div id="some_random_id"></div>     </body> </html>Provide a unique ID attribute to the div, as shown above. This will allow us to distinguish it from the element we want to implement.  Step:2 Add the Script Tags to the same HTML page before the </body> tag as shown below: (Same as above)  ...      <!-- To load React add the scripts. -->      <script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.development.js" crossorigin></script>      <script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.development.js" crossorigin></script>      </body>  </html>Here, we have added the scripts to load/import the React library.  Step:3 Now add one more script, to load our component which is “some_random_id” in the above code. Let’s name the JS file as “my_component.js”. <!DOCTYPE html>  <html>    <head>      <meta charset="UTF-8" />      <title>Steps To Add React to a Website </title>    </head>    <body>        <h2>Steps To Add React to a Website </h2>      <div id="some_random_id"></div>        <script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.development.js" crossorigin></script>      <script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.development.js" crossorigin></script>        <!-- To Load our React component. -->      <script src="my_component.js"></script>      </body>  </html>Step:4 Now, Create and open the file named my_component.js and paste the following code:  'use strict';  const e = React.createElement;  class myButton extends React.Component {    constructor(props) {      super(props);      this.state = { isliked: false };    }      render() {      if (this.state.isliked) {        return 'Yes I Really Like This.';      }        return e(        'button',        { onClick: () => this.setState({ isliked: true }) },        'Like Button'      );    }  }  const domContainer = document.querySelector('#some_random_id');  ReactDOM.render(e(myButton), domContainer);Here we have created a React component named myButton, and displayed a button inside it. Step:5 ???Step:6  ???No step 5 or 6! It’s done. React has been  successfully added to the project and you can check the output too. No step 5 or 6! It’s done. React has been  successfully added to the project and you can check the output too.Adding JSX in our ComponentsReact is added, now let’s jump to writing code in an easier manner.  Consider the following snippet: const element = <h1>Hello, Buddy!</h1>;What does this syntax look like? It’s neither a string nor an HTML. This is JSX, a simple extension to JavaScript. While it’s not mandatory to use JSX with React, most of the developers find it helpful while experimenting with UI. You will experience this yourself later.Let’s quickly try JSXJSX comes with full power, as of JavaScript. We will see this later. Let’s get started on JSX by simply adding the below script tag:<script src="https://unpkg.com/babel-standalone@6/babel.min.js"></script>Or you can also use JSX by adding type="text/babel" in any <script> tag.Add JSX to our ProjectAdding JSX to the project is more like adding some preprocessors for which we really need to install Node. If it’s already installed, then ignore this step and if it’s not, then:Install Node from hereCheck if Node is successfully installed by quickly running the following command in the terminal:node -vAnd it should give some output as:v8.11.4Note: Version may be less than 8.11.4. Great, let’s move ahead and add JSX to our project: Head to your website folder in the terminal: Run npm init -y Run npm install babel-cli@6 babel-preset-react-app@3 (NPM is used here to install JSX preprocessor) Done?  Let’s Run it! Running JSX Preprocessor  Go to the same website folder in terminal Create a folder named src Go inside src in the terminal and run the following command:  npx babel --watch src --out-dir . --presets react-app/prod Move the file “my_component.js” to the src folder and the watcher will convert the preprocessed file to basic Javascript file which is readable for the browser.  If you want to play around these preprocessors, head over here. Simple Example to See JSX: Let’s say we have a variable called title, we will see how we can use it in JSX: const title = 'React Developer';In JSX, we use by wrapping it in curly braces as {title}const title = 'React Developer'; const element = <h1>Welcome, {title}</h1>;   ReactDOM.render(   element,   document.getElementById('root') );AJAX and APIs Call-in React For Our Component    React doesn’t have any inbuilt package for calling the API calls, as it is a standalone library that comes only with fetch() method. But while working on Web projects, we need to render data somehow, either by local data or from server data. There are plenty of libraries by which we can make API calls, and we can choose any of them depending upon our project. Some of them are Fetch Axios React-Axios Use-Http React-request and more. Let’s go ahead with basic simple and index(0)th option, which is Fetch.  Trust me, you can choose any of them! Using Fetch to Make HTTP Calls in React Fetch() is a modern method and a browser-based API which is commonly used to make HTTP calls. The standard syntax of the Fetch API looks like: let response = fetch(     API_URL,     …. (some more options) );Here, API_URL is the URL using which we want to fetch the data from the server, and the URL comes with other arguments also depending upon the type of request (GET, PUSH, PUT,.. etc). The API returns with a promise which gets resolved into the response object once the response is fetched from the server. async getNames() {      // Calling some additional headers      const response = await       // Dummy API Data  fetch("https://jsonplaceholder.com/users", {        method: "GET", // *Type of request GET, POST, PUT, DELETE        mode: "cors", // Type of mode of the request        cache: "no-cache", // options like default, no-cache, reload, force-cache        headers: {          "Content-Type": "application/json" // request content type        },        credentials: "same-origin", // options like include, *same-origin, omit        redirect: "follow", // manual, *follow, error        referrerPolicy: "no-referrer", // no-referrer, *client        // body: JSON.stringify(data) // Attach body with the request      });        this.setState({ names: await response.json() });    } Here we have called a function named getNames, which fetches the data along with other parameters like: Method: what type of HTTP call is there, Header: to define request headers for authorization or content Mode: defines the type od mode, cors or no-cors,  As per official documentation: (Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS) is a mechanism that uses additional HTTP headers to tell browsers to give a web application running at one origin, access to selected resources from a different origin.) Read about CORS here  Body: to send some additional data to the server as a request body Based on the requirement, we can call the desired options. And we can also use catch for managing errors while making API calls. async getNames() {      // With .then and .catch section      let response = await fetch("https://jsonplaceholder.com/users")        .then(response => {          return response.json();        this.setState({ names: response })        })        .catch(error => {          console.log(error);        });    } This is how we can use Fetch to make API calls, and do further operations in React.Conclusion   In this article, we learned how to add a React component in an HTML file or an existing website. You can follow the same steps to your own website, or if you want to have a fresh start you can simply create an empty HTML file to get started with React. We also saw how we can use JSX in our project and also played around with basic Http calls in React. I hope this article was helpful in getting started with React.  Happy Learning!
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Steps to Add React to a Website

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Steps to Add React to a Website

React allows you to quickly develop complex user interfaces and web applications by breaking them down into simple and manageable components. Tailormade for today’s ever-evolving world, React JS is one of the most sought-after web frameworks among industries and is a key component of their growth.  

Note: This article is purely for beginners and hence the following process is NOT recommended for production sites. However, this will allow the reader to get a taste of React without delving into toolchains and complicated processes.  

So, let’s get started. 

All of you are already aware of ReactJs, designed by Facebook, which is a popular open-source JavaScript library. It is used for writing rich and engaging frontend abstractions in fewer lines of code within a short time. One of the reasons why React is so popular is because of its rendering performance.  

In this post, we will learn how to add React JS to our current website. This article will pave the way for you to quickly start coding with React JS or simply import React in your existing project. 

No, it’s not rocket science! You can simply add it in your html file, that too in 1 minute!  

What, just 1 minute? As in, 60 seconds…..? 

Read on to know more! 

Add React in One Minute 

An essential simple website consists of 3 files: 

  • Html file 
  • Js file, and 
  • CSS file  

 React JS can be used in a normal index.html file with no npm or web-packs. Hard to believe?  

Steps to Add ReactJs to an existing website:  

Let’s not waste any more time and start editing our existing HTML page, which is called index.html. There is no requirement of any external libraries or any other tool, just a code editor, website folder holding all the above files and Internet Connection.  

Step:1 Open the HTML file you want to edit and add a div on which you want to add the React implementation. 

For instance: (index.html) looks like this, see line number 12-13

<!DOCTYPE html> 
<html> 
  <head> 
    <meta charset="UTF-8" /> 
    <title>Steps To Add React to a Website </title> 
  </head> 
  <body> 
  
    <h2>Steps To Add React to a Website </h2> 
  
    <!-- We will put our React component inside this div. → Line 12 

    <div id="some_random_id"></div> 
  
  </body> 
</html>

Provide a unique ID attribute to the div, as shown above. This will allow us to distinguish it from the element we want to implement.  

Step:2 Add the Script Tags to the same HTML page before the </body> tag as shown below: 

(Same as above) 
... 
    <!-- To load React add the scripts. --> 
    <script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.development.js" crossorigin></script> 
    <script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.development.js" crossorigin></script> 
 
  </body> 
</html>

Here, we have added the scripts to load/import the React library.  

Step:3 Now add one more script, to load our component which is “some_random_id” in the above code. Let’s name the JS file as “my_component.js”. 

<!DOCTYPE html> 
<html> 
  <head> 
    <meta charset="UTF-8" /> 
    <title>Steps To Add React to a Website </title> 
  </head> 
  <body> 
 
    <h2>Steps To Add React to a Website </h2> 
    <div id="some_random_id"></div> 
 
    <script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.development.js" crossorigin></script> 
    <script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.development.js" crossorigin></script> 
 
    <!-- To Load our React component. --> 
    <script src="my_component.js"></script> 
 
  </body> 
</html>

Step:4 Now, Create and open the file named my_component.js and paste the following code:  

'use strict'; 
const e = React.createElement; 
class myButton extends React.Component { 
  constructor(props) { 
    super(props); 
    this.state = { isliked: false }; 
  } 
 
  render() { 
    if (this.state.isliked) { 
      return 'Yes I Really Like This.'; 
    } 
 
    return e( 
      'button', 
      { onClick: () => this.setState({ isliked: true }) }, 
      'Like Button' 
    ); 
  } 
} 
const domContainer = document.querySelector('#some_random_id'); 
ReactDOM.render(e(myButton), domContainer);

Here we have created React component named myButton, and displayed a button inside it. 

Step:5 ???

Step:6  ???

No step 5 or 6! It’s done. React has been  successfully added to the project and you can check the output too. 

No step 5 or 6! It’s done. React has been  successfully added to the project and you can check the output too.

Adding JSX in our Components

React is added, now let’s jump to writing code in an easier manner.  

Consider the following snippet: 

const element = <h1>Hello, Buddy!</h1>;

What does this syntax look like? It’s neither a string nor an HTML. This is JSX, a simple extension to JavaScript. While it’s not mandatory to use JSX with React, most of the developers find it helpful while experimenting with UI. You will experience this yourself later.

Let’s quickly try JSX

JSX comes with full power, as of JavaScript. We will see this later. Let’s get started on JSX by simply adding the below script tag:

<script src="https://unpkg.com/babel-standalone@6/babel.min.js"></script>

Or you can also use JSX by adding type="text/babel" in any <script> tag.

Add JSX to our Project

Adding JSX to the project is more like adding some preprocessors for which we really need to install Node. If it’s already installed, then ignore this step and if it’s not, then:

Install Node from here

Check if Node is successfully installed by quickly running the following command in the terminal:

node -v

And it should give some output as:

v8.11.4

Note: Version may be less than 8.11.4. 

Great, let’s move ahead and add JSX to our project: 

  1. Head to your website folder in the terminal: 

  1. Run npm init -y 

  1. Run npm install babel-cli@6 babel-preset-react-app@3 (NPM is used here to install JSX preprocessor) 

Done?  Let’s Run it! 

Running JSX Preprocessor  

  1. Go to the same website folder in terminal 
  2. Create a folder named src 
  3. Go inside src in the terminal and run the following command:  
npx babel --watch src --out-dir . --presets react-app/prod

Move the file “my_component.js” to the src folder and the watcher will convert the preprocessed file to basic Javascript file which is readable for the browser.  

If you want to play around these preprocessors, head over here. 

Simple Example to See JSX: 

Let’s say we have a variable called title, we will see how we can use it in JSX: 

const title = 'React Developer';

In JSX, we use by wrapping it in curly braces as {title}

const title = 'React Developer'; 
const element = <h1>Welcome, {title}</h1>; 
  
ReactDOM.render( 
  element, 
  document.getElementById('root') 
);

AJAX and APIs Call-in React For Our Component    

React doesn’t have any inbuilt package for calling the API calls, as it is a standalone library that comes only with fetch() method. But while working on Web projects, we need to render data somehow, either by local data or from server data. 

There are plenty of libraries by which we can make API calls, and we can choose any of them depending upon our project. Some of them are 

  • Fetch 
  • Axios 
  • React-Axios 
  • Use-Http 
  • React-request and more. 

Let’s go ahead with basic simple and index(0)th option, which is Fetch.  Trust me, you can choose any of them! 

Using Fetch to Make HTTP Calls in React 

Fetch() is a modern method and a browser-based API which is commonly used to make HTTP calls. The standard syntax of the Fetch API looks like: 

let response = fetch( 
    API_URL, 
    …. (some more options) 
);

Here, API_URL is the URL using which we want to fetch the data from the server, and the URL comes with other arguments also depending upon the type of request (GET, PUSH, PUT,.. etc). 

The API returns with a promise which gets resolved into the response object once the response is fetched from the server. 

async getNames() { 
    // Calling some additional headers 
    const response = await  
    // Dummy API Data 
fetch("https://jsonplaceholder.com/users", { 
      method: "GET", // *Type of request GET, POST, PUT, DELETE 
      mode: "cors", // Type of mode of the request 
      cache: "no-cache", // options like default, no-cache, reload, force-cache 
      headers: { 
        "Content-Type": "application/json" // request content type 
      }, 
      credentials: "same-origin", // options like include, *same-origin, omit 
      redirect: "follow", // manual, *follow, error 
      referrerPolicy: "no-referrer", // no-referrer, *client 
      // body: JSON.stringify(data) // Attach body with the request 
    }); 
 
    this.setState({ names: await response.json() }); 
  } 

Here we have called a function named getNames, which fetches the data along with other parameters like: 

  • Method: what type of HTTP call is there, 
  • Header: to define request headers for authorization or content 
  • Mode: defines the type od mode, cors or no-cors,  

As per official documentation: 

(Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS) is a mechanism that uses additional HTTP headers to tell browsers to give a web application running at one origin, access to selected resources from a different origin.) 

Read about CORS here  

  • Body: to send some additional data to the server as a request body 

Based on the requirement, we can call the desired options. And we can also use catch for managing errors while making API calls. 

async getNames() { 
    // With .then and .catch section 
    let response = await fetch("https://jsonplaceholder.com/users") 
      .then(response => { 
        return response.json(); 
      this.setState({ names: response }) 
      }) 
      .catch(error => { 
        console.log(error); 
      }); 
  } 

This is how we can use Fetch to make API calls, and do further operations in React.

Conclusion   

In this article, we learned how to add a React component in an HTML file or an existing website. You can follow the same steps to your own website, or if you want to have a fresh start you can simply create an empty HTML file to get started with React. We also saw how we can use JSX in our project and also played around with basic Http calls in React. 

I hope this article was helpful in getting started with React.  

Happy Learning!

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Website : https://www.knowledgehut.com

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A sample has been shown below:Demo_App --app.js --index.html --nav.htmlThe ‘nav.html’ file needs to have the content as mentioned below: The nav bar title The contents of the file  The two different actions that would be created will also be mentioned here (The home page and the log in.) The index.html file will have the required dependencies along with nav.html file.  The nav.html file will be included in the body tag of the index.html page. The dependencies will be included with the help of ‘CDN’ in the head tag. A separate body tag will be used to define the ui-view div. The ui-view is a section where the information about various routes content and how they would be rendered is present.  The ui-view is a directive that is present inside the ui.router module.  The ui-view directive tells the ‘$state’ about the positioning of the template properties (or other property) It would look like below (sample):  An app.js file can be created, which is an application file that contains the route information and the actions that need to be performed with the help of the controller in the application framework. Below is a sample app.js file:var app = angular.module('Demo_App', [ "ui.router" ]);   app.config(function($stateProvider, $locationProvider,                                   $urlRouterProvider)   {       $stateProvider.state('home_page',   {               url : '/home',               template : "Home page",               controller : "hmeCtrl"         })           .state('login_page',   {               url : '/login',               template : "Login page",               controller : "lgnCtrl"         })       $urlRouterProvider.otherwise("/home");   });   app.controller('mainCtrl', function() {});   app.controller('hmeCtrl', function() {});   app.controller('lgnCtrl', function() {});The first line of the sample code declares the name of the application module and injects a ui.router module dependency into it. Next, the route configurations are defined inside the app.config and the dependency injections are set up.  The routes for the required attributes are set up with the help of the ‘stateProvider’ function and mentioning the required parameters.  Once the home page and the login have been set up, a condition is set up where the page would be redirected back to the home page if any of the routes don’t match the url name. This is done with the help of the ‘otherwise’ function.   Empty states are created for the controllers. This is done since it is a sample and no operation is being performed inside these states.  The above sample application can be run in the browser after the http-serve node module has been installed (as mentioned in the first step of this explanation).   Next step is to navigate to the ‘routingDemo’ folder and execute the below mentioned command:http-serverThis command helps in hosting the demonstration application on the default port that is 8080. This can be accessed with the help of the below mentioned link:localhost:8080/When the application is accessed via a browser, it will be a web application with two routes, namely: Home Login Conclusion In this post, we understood the prominence of Angular JS Routing and Router, and how they are different from the traditional approaches. They help bridge a gap between the features that traditional approaches implement, thereby increasing the ability of web pages to work and perform in a better, more user-friendly manner.
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Easier Angular JS Routing With Angular UI Router

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What Is Dependency Injection in AngularJS

AngularJS is an open source JavaScript MVW (Model View Whatever) framework backed by Google and is widely popular for creating dynamic apps. It offers a suite of tools that can be used for building the framework most suited to your single page application development. However, it can also be fully utilized to work for other categories of web pages. It works well with other web-based libraries and is fully extensible. All its features can be modified and even can be replaced to suit your unique development workflow and web feature needs.    As AngularJS is a pure JavaScript framework, it can be added to an HTML page with a normal  tag with src attribute pointing to the source framework library, just like other JavaScript libraries.  AngularJS extends HTML attributes using Directives.  It binds data to HTML using Expressions. AngularJS can be downloaded from https://angularjs.org/. If you’re new to AngularJS, it is better to get introductory information from http://angularjs.org. This site provides the basic information required to start working with AngularJS. It has various features including MVC Architecture, Directives, Expressions, Controllers, Filters, HTML DOM, Modules, Views, AJAX, Scopes, Services, Dependency Injection, and Internationalization. We will deal with Dependency Injection in the following section. IntroductionDependency Injection − AngularJS has a built-in dependency injection (DI) subsystem library whose work is to help the development team by making the application easier to develop, test, and understand. We will learn about each part of DI in detail. The topics we will go through in this article are: Dependency injection in AngularJS Value Injecting a Value Factory Injecting Values into a Factory Service Injecting Values into a Service Providers Configuring a Provider Constants Dependencies Between Modules Dependency injection in AngularJs Today’s software is totally designed in accordance with various design patterns. One such pattern is Dependency Injection. The DI design pattern specifies the pattern in which components are provided with their dependencies, instead of hard coding them within the component. AngularJS comes with a built-in dependency injection mechanism that enables you to divide your application into various types of components which can be injected into each other as their respective dependencies. Modularization of your application makes it easier to use, reuse, configure and even test the different components in your application. According to DI the core types of objects and components include the following: Value Factory Service Provider Constant These are the objects and components which can be injected into each other using AngularJS Dependency Injection. ValueFor AngularJS, the “Value” is a simple object. It can be a number, a string or a POJO (Plain old JavaScript object). This object is used to pass values in AngularJS factories, AngularJS services or AngularJS controllers during the run and config phase. The following example shows the steps involved in using a value. Step 1:  Define a module   var myMod = angular.module("myModule", []); Here, myModule is created using the AngularJS function angular.module(). You can add value, controllers, directives, filters, and more, to your AngularJS application using a module. Step 2: Create a value object and pass data to it.    myMod.value("numberValue", 10);    myMod.value("stringValue", "aaa");    myMod.value("objectValue", { field1 : 123, field2 : "abc"} );  Here, values are defined using the value () function on the module as created in step 1. The first parameter specifies the name of the value, and the second parameter is the value itself passed to other parts of the application. Factories, services and controllers can now reference these values by their value name. Step 3: Injecting a value in Controller function To inject a value into AngularJS controller function, we need to add a parameter with the same value name as that with which the value was defined. Note that the controller function is registered in angular via the angular.module(...).controller(...) function call. The $scope parameter passed to the controller function is the model for the controller. Thus, here myMod is the module registering the controller as myController, and $scope is the model for myController.  var myMod = angular.module("myModule", []);    myMod.value("numberValue", 10);    myMod.controller("myController", function($scope, numberValue) {     console.log(numberValue);    });Example: Using Value in AngularJS: Consider that you have already downloaded the latest AngularJS file from https://angularjs.org/ (here we are using the minified version of AngularJS as angular.min.js). We can even use the AngularJs CDN for the same provided by Google.          Value in AngularJS             Value Example     The numberValue is: {{nValue}}        var myMod = angular.module('myModule', []);  myMod.value("numberValue", 5);  myMod.controller('myController', function($scope, numberValue)   {  $scope.nValue =numberValue;  });       Output: Factory In AngularJS, a factory is a function that is used to return a value. This function creates the value on demand whenever a service or controller needs any value injected from the factory. AngularJS applications normally use a factory function to calculate and return a value. The following example shows the steps involved in using a Factory. Step 1:  Define a module   var myMod = angular.module("myModule", []);   Here, myModule is created using the AngularJS function angular.module(). You can add factory, value, controllers, directives, filters, and more, to your AngularJS application using a module. Step 2: Create a factory object and return data from it.    myMod.factory("myFactory", function() {        return "a value";    }); Here, we have used the factory function to create a Factory named myFactory. This Factory is returning “a value” from it. Step 3: Injecting values into factory Create a controller which gets the factory created value injected (for explanation of Controller, go to the Value part of the article and navigate to its Step 3). To inject a factory value into AngularJS controller function, we need to add a parameter with the same value name as that with which the factory was defined.  var myMod = angular.module("myModule", []);    myMod.factory("myFactory", function() {        return "a value";    });  myMod.controller("MyController", function($scope, myFactory) {    console.log(myFactory);    }); Note: It is not the factory function that is injected, but the value produced by the factory function that gets injected. Example: Using Factory in AngularJS:         Factory                Factory Example    The numberFactory is: {{nFactory}}        var myMod = angular.module('myModule', []);  myMod.factory("myFactory", function() {    return "a value";    });        myMod.controller('myController', function($scope, myFactory) {  $scope. nFactory =myFactory;  });       Output: Service Web Services are helpful functions that perform a task. Similarly, in AngularJS, Service is a JavaScript object which contains a set of functions to perform certain tasks. Services are created by using service() function on a module and then injecting it into controllers. The following example shows the steps involved in using a Service. Step 1:  Define a module   var myMod = angular.module("myModule", []);   Here, myModule is created using the AngularJS function angular.module(). You can add Services, factory, value, controllers, directives, filters, and more, to your AngularJS application using a module. Step 2: Create a service for defining the MathService for calculating basic math functions like add, subtract, multiply and divide. And then create another service, myService for defining a cube method to return the cube of a given number: myMod.service('MathService', function() {      this.add = function(a, b) { return a + b };      this.subtract = function(a, b) { return a - b };      this.multiply = function(a, b) { return a * b };      this.divide = function(a, b) { return a / b };  });  myMod.service('myService', function(MathService){       this.cube = function(a) {          return MathService.multiply(a,MathService.multiply(a,a));        }    }); The above code snippet uses MathService to call multiply function that takes two parameters and calculates the product.  Step 3: Inject the service "myService" into the controller   Create a controller which gets the Service injected (for explanation of Controller, go to the Value part of the article and navigate to its Step 3). To inject a Service function into AngularJS controller function, we need to add a parameter with the same value name as that with which the Service was defined.  myMod.controller('myController', function($scope, myService) {        $scope.doCube = function() {          $scope.result = myService.cube($scope.number);       }    }); Here we can even make it event based by adding an event in the main HTML content as:   Enter a number:            Cube      Result of Service: {{result}}      Example: Using Service in AngularJS:         Service Example           Service Example        Result of Service: {{result}}          var myMod = angular.module("myModule", []);  myMod.service('myService', function(){  this.sum = function(a,b) {  return a + b;  }      });  myMod.controller('myController', function($scope, myService) {  $scope.result = myService.sum (5, 6);  });       Output: Provider In AngularJS, a provider is used to internally create other values or services or factory during config phase (the phase during which AngularJS bootstraps itself). Provider can be considered to be the most flexible form of factory you can create. Provider is a special factory method with a get() function which is used to return the value or service or factory. The following example shows the steps involved in using a Provider. Step 1:  Define a module   var myMod = angular.module("myModule", []);   Here, myModule is created using the AngularJS function angular.module(). You can add Services, factory, value, controllers, directives, filters, and more, to your AngularJS application using a module. Step 2: Create a service using provider which defines a method square to return the square of a number.  We use provider method to create a Provider.   myMod.config(function($provide) {       $provide.provider('myServiceProvider', function() {          this.$get = function() {             var factory = {};               factory.multiply = function(a, b) {                return a * b;              }             return factory;          };       });    });  Step 3: Inject the Provider "myServiceProvider" into the controller   Create a controller which gets the Provider injected (To understand how to create a Controller, go to the Value part of the article and navigate to its Step 3). To inject a Provider function into AngularJS controller function, we need to add a parameter with the same value name as that with which the provider was defined.  myMod.controller('myController', function($scope, myServiceProvider, defaultInput) {        $scope.number = defaultInput;        $scope.result = myServiceProvider.multiply($scope.number, $scope.number);        $scope.square = function() {               $scope.result = myServiceProvider.multiply($scope.number, $scope.number);         }       });   Example: Using Provider in AngularJS:             Provider               Provider Example                        Enter a number:      X 2              Result: {{result}}                                  var myMod  = angular.module("myModule", []);              myMod.config(function($provide) {    $provide.provider('myServiceProvider', function() {    this.$get = function() {    var factory = {};    factory.multiply = function(a) {     return a * a;          }  return factory;      };        });      });             myMod.value("defaultInput", 10);             myMod.controller('myController', function($scope, myServiceProvider, defaultInput) {                $scope.number = defaultInput;                $scope.result = myServiceProvider.multiply($scope.number);    $scope.square = function() {    $scope.result = myServiceProvider.multiply($scope.number);     }        });               Output: Constants Config Phase of AngularJS has some restrictions for injected values, as you cannot inject values into the module.config() function. Instead constants are used to pass values at config phase. To define a constant value we use the constant() function of the defined module. Then for the constant parameter we provide a constant value. The following example shows the steps involved in using a Constant in AngularJS. Step 1: Define a module   var myMod = angular.module("myModule", []);  Here, myModule is created using the AngularJS function angular.module(). You can add Services, factory, value, controllers, directives, filters, and more, to your AngularJS application using a module. Step 2: Create a constant using the constant function and pass constant data to it.      myMod.constant("configParam", "constant value");    Example: Using Constant in AngularJS:              Constant            Constant Example      The numberConstant is:  {{nConstant}}            var myMod = angular.module('myModule', []);      myMod.constant("nConst", 5);      myMod.controller('myController', function($scope,nConst) {  $scope.nConstant =nConst;  });        Output: Difference between Constant and Value Values and Constants seem to be applied in the same way; however, Value differs from Constant in that value cannot be injected into configurations, but it can be intercepted by decorators. Also, a Constant can be used during the apps config phase, whereas a Value is only available during the run phase. The main difference between value and constant is that a value specified using Constant is available during the configuration phase while value specified using Value is available during the run phase. Example showing the difference between a Constant and a Value:          Constant                  Constant Example    {{ID}}          var myMod = angular.module('myModule', []);  myMod.value("myValue", "First Assignment");  myMod.value("myValue", "Second  Assignment");  myMod.constant("myConstant", "First Assignment");  myMod.constant("myConstant", "Second Assignment");  myMod.controller("myController", function($scope, myValue, myConstant) {  console.log("myValue: " + myValue);  console.log("myConstant: " + myConstant);  $scope.ID = " myValue: " + myValue + "&nbsp   myConstant: " + myConstant;  });       Output: Constant Example myValue: Second Assignment myConstant: First Assignment  Complete Example: AngularJS Dependency Injection Let's take an example to deploy all the above mentioned directives.                AngularJS Dependency Injection                 AngularJS Application Showing Dependency Injection         Enter a number:         X  2                Result: {{result}}                          var myMod = angular.module("myMod", []);    myMod.config(function($provide) {    $provide.provider('MathService', function() {    this.$get = function() {    var factory = {};    factory.multiply = function(a, b) {    return a * b;          }    return factory;      };        });      });    myMod.value("defaultInput", 10);    myMod.factory('MathService', function() {                var factory = {};                factory.multiply = function(a, b) {    return a * b;  }    return factory;  });           myMod.service('CalcService', function(MathService){    this.square = function(a) {    return MathService.multiply(a,a);     }         });    myMod.controller('myController', function($scope, CalcService, defaultInput) {    $scope.number = defaultInput;    $scope.result = CalcService.square($scope.number);    $scope.square = function() {    $scope.result = CalcService.square($scope.number);      }        });               Output: ConclusionIn the above article we learned about the Dependency Injection in AngularJS. Dependency Injection is a software design pattern that specifies how components get hold of their dependencies. In this pattern, components are given their dependencies instead of coding them directly within the component. We learned about core types of objects and components like Value, Factory, Service, Provider, and Constant. We learned how to create and register an injectable service and configure an injector with a service provider. We learned how to work with Injecting services to a controller. In the end we summarized with a complete example how Providers, Services, Factory and Value can be used.  
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What Is Dependency Injection in AngularJS

AngularJS is an open source JavaScript MVW (M... Read More

How to become a Full Stack Pro

Full stack developers are in high demand in the software development industry. These developers understand all aspects of the development process including user experience and data maintenance. Hiring full stack developers reduce the need to hire too many resources for product development. In this article, we have explained the concept of full stack development and how it can benefit businesses. Full Stack Development has come to the picture as none of the organisation would like to invest a lot by hiring software development services from different developers. Understanding the increased competition in the market. Front-end development Front-end development consists of the entire user-facing parts of software development. It is the responsibility of the Front-end developers to implement visual elements like how the software or an app will look, interact and operate with the user. Back-end development Back-end development is responsible for making a program function well. The developers who work at back-end spend a lot of time creating and working with databases. To develop a user-driven software, you need both. Full stack developer is the one who is pro in both the technical domains. Also, they understand every aspect of development including front-end, back-end, database queries and various operating systems. Such high-skilled developers are recognized as “developer generalists” as they can develop any complex application from scratch and understand how each technical layer interacts with the other. Technical Skills 1. Programming languages A skilful full-stack developer must be proficient in multiple programming languages like JAVA, C#, Ruby and PHP. It is crucial to be a master in the language syntax and be familiar with how to design, structure, test and implement the programming codes. 2. Development frameworks and third-party libraries Development languages are generally accompanied by a good development framework like Node.Js, Express.JS, Hibernate, Python Django, Java Spring, MyBatis and PHP Thinkphp. Therefore, it is good for the full stack developers to understand the development frameworks and third-party libraries. 3. Front-end technology For the development of a product, front-end technologies are necessities. The full-stack developer needs to have some basic knowledge of front-end technologies such as HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript and should study the frameworks such as JQuery, LESS, SASS, AngularJS, or REACT. 4. Database and cache Every software product needs a database to store the data. A full stack development expert should understand the concepts of the databases and know how to interact with it seamlessly. MongoDB, MySQL, Redis, Oracle are some popular databases that are being used by the developers to develop the backend for dynamic applications. 5. Basic design ability When it comes to basic design utility, it is crucial for full stack developers to understand the basic principles and skills of prototype design, UX and UI design. It is very important a Full Stack Developer to understand all the following technology stacks that are key to software development Backend Architecture Microservices: It allows the business functionality to be split up into independent services. The microservice architecture can help businesses automate in-house processes in a short period. It is the perfect option for every size of companies who wish to automate their business operations and efficiently realize its value. Blockchain platforms: Using the blockchain platforms for developing dApps have benefited top companies like IBM and Oracle. Following are the blockchain platforms, helping you to choose the right one for your project: Hyperledger: Hosted by Linux Foundation, Hyperledger is an open source project, offering toolsets, frameworks and projects for developers to build and experiment using blockchain technologies. Ethereum: It uses a proof-of-work (PoW) algorithm, known as “Ethash,” which needs more memory to make it hard to mine. You can get the dApp built on Ethereum for streamlining your business operations. Hedera: Hedera is the public hashgraph network, governed by a council of renowned enterprises and organizations, across multiple industries. The Hedera Hashgraph platform provides the distributed consensus in a new form, which is trusted, secure and does not need an intermediary. Mobile app development React Native: It allows to build the application using Javascript. The native approach, React Native can speed up the process of development and create compelling mobile apps.Rather than offering a slow user experience that’s not useful for a platform, it provides all the advantages of a native application. Xamarin: Xamarin has been referred to be the best choice for full-stack developers who want to build cross-platform portability that integrates an app to all three mobile platforms, i.e., iOS, Android and Windows.Therefore, it minimizes the time, saves money and efforts of the developers when it comes to the development of mobile application. Cordova: Also known as PhoneGap, it allows developers to build a mobile app and then wrap it in the framework that can be installed as an application across several mobile device platforms without a lot of extra efforts. SWIFT/Obj.C: These both are programming languages that can be used to code the Apple software products under iOS, tvOS, CarPlay, macOS, watchOS and Linux (only for Swift) operating systems. Also, these languages have different APIs and frameworks. JAVA/Kotlin: A statically-typed programming language is offering full compatibility with JAVA, allows writing less code, can compile to JavaScript source code while having readable syntax. Back-end and Framework Technologies Node.JS: Built on Chrome’s Javascript runtime that can create scalable network applications faster than ever. The open-source cross-browser environment, Node.JS has been built to seek the attention of worldwide developers. Express.js: It is an open-source framework for Node.Js can be used to simplify the development with a set of tools, packages, plugins and features. Express.js with Node.js can be used to develop APIs for single and multi-page, hybrid mobile and web apps. PHP: An open source platform that allows rapid creation of prototypes and websites. The programming language can be used to develop user-friendly websites for small or big enterprises in less time and budget. Python: Python is based on a high-level dynamic programming language that can offer a plethora of business benefits. Since it can easily interact with other languages, you can get the freedom for future upgrades. Python development is highly suitable for customizing larger apps as the language comes with various features such as scalability, special libraries, extensibility and easy readable syntax. Laravel: One of the top PHP frameworks, Laravel can offer enhanced security to the data as well as users. It can help limit unauthorized users from accessing any paid services or something crucial to the business. Front-end Technologies Front-end refers to the development of the web pages and user interfaces for websites or applications. It implements the design, structure, behavior and animation of everything that you experience visually on the screen while using the site, web applications and mobile apps. BootStrap: It is a front-end framework, that supports the creation of dynamic websites and applications. It is a highly preferred front-end framework that allows fast and easy ways of building a website. If you want to develop an application, it is crucial to consider Bootstrap as it helps save the coding efforts and offers a lot of commonly used Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) functionalities, by default. React JS: A javascript library that is perfect for building the amazing user interfaces. Its development is known for delivering high-performance client’s and server-side’s rendering. AngularJs: When it comes to developing the browser, web-based applications and mobile apps, Angular JS is perfect for the development of all types of apps. Angular JS, developed and maintained by Google developers has been known for its flexibility. HTML/CSS: These are the basic building blocks used to design and development of websites. It enables you to add content and styles to your project site. It is the building block of any digital content today on the internet. Javascript: JavaScript has been the most popular scripting language for a long time. It enables you to perform quick actions on the client side itself without the need for a response from the server side. This vastly improves the user experience and efficiency of the website or application. Database Technologies Database technologies grab details and store, organize and process it in an easy way that allows users to find the required data quickly. MySQL: It is free to use an open source database, offering easy database management by connecting it to the software. Since it is a robust, scalable and reliable solution, providing advanced benefits such as data security, on-demand scalability, high performance and complete workflow control, it is widely used in small or medium-sized applications. MongoDB: It is a free, open-source and distributed database at its core. Having sharding and scaling features, MongoDB can help enterprises to maintain and customize database development to a large extent. PostgreSQL: Being one of the most advanced open source databases, it offers endless development opportunities to enterprises. It can be widely used in large-scale applications or websites. DynamoDB: Amazon web service was introduced as one of the most prominent NoSQL cloud databases. DynamoDB has a flexible schema and is scalable, which allows users to quickly change how data is structured and can run various queries against it. Cloud Services Amazon Web Services (AWS): It is known to be a secure cloud services platform offering deployment tools, database storage, content delivery, computing power and functionality solutions. These services can aid enterprise applications by increasing flexibility, reliability, lowering the IT costs and offering scalability. Microsoft Azure: It helps to increase the business agility as it offers a host of application building blocks and services, allowing users to customize the cloud as required. Google Cloud Platform (GCP): Google offers a suite of public cloud computing services known as GCP. A range of hosted services for computing, applications development and storage, which run on the Google hardware are included in the platform. The GCP services can be utilized by cloud admins, enterprise IT professionals and developers through a dedicated network connection. Version Control System (VCS) and Debugging Version control can help record changes to a file or set of files over time, enabling you to recall specific versions later. Following, are some of the version control systems: GIT: Most favored and widely used distributed version control system, GIT performs robustly and reliably as compared with other VCs. It also helps maintain the integrity of source code. GIT ensures to have an authentic history of the source code. Full-stack developers or development company can use GIT for developing the projects as it offers excellent performance, security, flexibility and functionality. Xdebug: Released in 2002, Xdebug is a PHP extension, which provides profiling and debugging capabilities. Subversion: It is a centralized version control system which means the history of the version is stored in a central server.Devops It is the combination of tools, cultural philosophies and practices, which enhances the enterprise’s ability to deliver services and apps at high speed. The great speed allows companies to offer better service to their clients and compete effectively in the market. It is the practice of operations that allows the developers to participate together in the entire lifecycle of the service, from design to development and production support. DevOps enables developers and operations teams to offer high speed, reliability, security, scalability and regular updates to their customers. In ConclusionBecoming a Full Stack Developer has its own advantages including the knowledge of both front-end and back-end. The developer can be in-charge of the project and ensure fast and timely delivery of the project.
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How to become a Full Stack Pro

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