Search

Progressing From Agile Practitioner To Agile Coach- A Perspective

Introduction: -With Agile becoming a norm in the current world, enterprises that want to be in the forefront of transformation typically focuses on an adoption strategy that involves hiring Agile practitioners. This hiring is expected to create and foster an Agile culture by coaching employees who may not have any prior Agile experience.I had an opportunity to lead one of the high profile enterprise Agile product development in my organization for a US client. It was a multi-year program with more than 60+ team members distributed geographically across 4 locations (India & US). The program was highly visible and had all tight constraints in terms of budget, timeline, and quality. The client’s engineering teams were too slow in adoption and were not supported by strong engineering practices and focusing only on management aspects.The hope was that my 'extreme programming and engineering practices' background would bring light at the end of the tunnel! Also, since I had spent a considerable amount of time as a practitioner and had attended internal training on coaching, my manager was confident about my accrued experience.I took on all these challenges one by one and also in the meantime I learned that coaching involves three simple stages, as follows. Let’s see these 3 different stages of Agile Coaching that will help you to move from an Agile Practitioner to Agile Coaching.Three Stages/Phases of Agile Coaching: -First is the Assessment Stage, where I observed existing processes and interaction with the team members, gauging them on technical and non­-technical considerations. I evaluated some of the baseline metrics and assessment reports.I was able to identify some of the key improvement areas that could help the team and client progress towards the goal quickly and deliver value. I had devoted a lot of time in listening actively to the team members on multiple occasions. This gave lots of insights into various processes and standards followed by the team and its dynamics. Some of the key challenges that existed were,Non-standardized approach by the team leading to the suboptimal solution.Unwilling to share the best practices or knowledge.Lack of cross synergy and cohesion thereby decreasing overall velocity.Losing focus on the big picture leading to silo working modelThe second is the Active coaching stage where I started encouraging the team members to set specific goals and provide accountability and followed-up to improve the performance. More often I would have open conversations like “What can I do to help you improve?” and create awareness around the problem or issues.I was able to change or influence the behavior patterns of the team on retrospectives during stressful times by not attending the ceremony. This provided freedom to the team members and allowed them to express freely on the pitfalls and improvement areas.I noticed a few things..The build took almost 2 hours, potentially delaying deployment across multiple stages. I probed the team to come up with new ideas to reduce the build time and team was able to explore multiple options and with maven scripts, the team reduced the build time to 45 minutes (60% reduction).The personal characteristics and attitude are most difficult to change as they are built from childhood. I would often leave it to the individual to resolve if there is a need to change and why it would benefit them personally.The key was to actively listen to their opinions, ideas and most importantly to empathize and motivate the team members. I realized as a coach, that influencing or changing behaviors of the team cannot be done overnight and provide immediate results but was always a gradual and long-term process. Over a period of time, the team became self-sufficient and I observed well-enabled retrospectives and well maintained Jira boards.  The difference between completed and accepted story points came down to 3-5% from 8-10%. The team had started realizing their potential without much of an active involvement from me. Team dynamics often created unpredictability (low motivational levels, low performance, poor standards etc.) and I was careful particularly in not providing any directions and specify the outcomes rather understood the working ways of the team and coached them to overcome all of these challenges by themselves.The final stage is Sustainability, which is to continue to perform better indefinitely while I stepped back and enjoyed the results and performance of the team. In some iterations, the results were excellent and few iterations stayed flat.I reviewed the qualitative and quantitative metrics from time to time just to make sure the fundamentals were being followed and as long as there is a harmony in the team, I didn’t interfere. I also learned to identify the quick learners, star performers and nurtured them as they were the ones who would eventually become the team’s influencers and motivators and made them as the internal coaches to continue this endeavor forever. I fostered a healthy relationship with multiple units in the team, for the team to function more effectively.Responsibilities of an Agile CoachPlays a mentoring or coaching role in the organization without being a part of the Scrum teamMost often this person is not a part of the Scrum team and an outsider (from outside the organization)Guides the team members, without personal or political considerationsThe person is an Agile expertIs experienced in implementing Agile techniques in different cultures and environmentsAble to run the complex and different sized Agile projects successfullyA Roadway from Agile Practitioner to Coach:-The coaching experience gave me a sense of fulfillment as I would see mostly the team smiling and brimming with ideas for improvement constantly in the journey of self-reliance. This has helped me improve my personal traits to a greater extent and I feel that I’ve made a sincere attempt to embed myself into my organization towards enterprise agility.Despite the resistance from the team members to change, I was able to win and influence them through my communication, empathy and logical reasoning skills. I truly believed coaching focuses on helping another person learn in ways that let him or her keep growing afterward. It is based on asking rather than telling, on provoking thought rather than giving directions and on holding a person accountable for his or her goals.
Rated 4.0/5 based on 0 customer reviews

Progressing From Agile Practitioner To Agile Coach- A Perspective

172
Progressing From Agile Practitioner To Agile Coach- A Perspective

Introduction: -

With Agile becoming a norm in the current world, enterprises that want to be in the forefront of transformation typically focuses on an adoption strategy that involves hiring Agile practitioners. This hiring is expected to create and foster an Agile culture by coaching employees who may not have any prior Agile experience.

I had an opportunity to lead one of the high profile enterprise Agile product development in my organization for a US client. It was a multi-year program with more than 60+ team members distributed geographically across 4 locations (India & US). The program was highly visible and had all tight constraints in terms of budget, timeline, and quality. The client’s engineering teams were too slow in adoption and were not supported by strong engineering practices and focusing only on management aspects.

The hope was that my 'extreme programming and engineering practices' background would bring light at the end of the tunnel! Also, since I had spent a considerable amount of time as a practitioner and had attended internal training on coaching, my manager was confident about my accrued experience.

I took on all these challenges one by one and also in the meantime I learned that coaching involves three simple stages, as follows. Let’s see these 3 different stages of Agile Coaching that will help you to move from an Agile Practitioner to Agile Coaching.

Three Stages/Phases of Agile Coaching: -

Three Stages/Phases of Agile CoachingFirst is the Assessment Stage, where I observed existing processes and interaction with the team members, gauging them on technical and non­-technical considerations. I evaluated some of the baseline metrics and assessment reports.

I was able to identify some of the key improvement areas that could help the team and client progress towards the goal quickly and deliver value. I had devoted a lot of time in listening actively to the team members on multiple occasions. This gave lots of insights into various processes and standards followed by the team and its dynamics. Some of the key challenges that existed were,

  • Non-standardized approach by the team leading to the suboptimal solution.
  • Unwilling to share the best practices or knowledge.
  • Lack of cross synergy and cohesion thereby decreasing overall velocity.
  • Losing focus on the big picture leading to silo working model

The second is the Active coaching stage where I started encouraging the team members to set specific goals and provide accountability and followed-up to improve the performance. More often I would have open conversations like “What can I do to help you improve?” and create awareness around the problem or issues.

I was able to change or influence the behavior patterns of the team on retrospectives during stressful times by not attending the ceremony. This provided freedom to the team members and allowed them to express freely on the pitfalls and improvement areas.

I noticed a few things..

The build took almost 2 hours, potentially delaying deployment across multiple stages. I probed the team to come up with new ideas to reduce the build time and team was able to explore multiple options and with maven scripts, the team reduced the build time to 45 minutes (60% reduction).

The personal characteristics and attitude are most difficult to change as they are built from childhood. I would often leave it to the individual to resolve if there is a need to change and why it would benefit them personally.

The key was to actively listen to their opinions, ideas and most importantly to empathize and motivate the team members. I realized as a coach, that influencing or changing behaviors of the team cannot be done overnight and provide immediate results but was always a gradual and long-term process. Over a period of time, the team became self-sufficient and I observed well-enabled retrospectives and well maintained Jira boards.  

The difference between completed and accepted story points came down to 3-5% from 8-10%. The team had started realizing their potential without much of an active involvement from me. Team dynamics often created unpredictability (low motivational levels, low performance, poor standards etc.) and I was careful particularly in not providing any directions and specify the outcomes rather understood the working ways of the team and coached them to overcome all of these challenges by themselves.
coaching difficulty & resistance in agileThe final stage is Sustainability, which is to continue to perform better indefinitely while I stepped back and enjoyed the results and performance of the team. In some iterations, the results were excellent and few iterations stayed flat.

I reviewed the qualitative and quantitative metrics from time to time just to make sure the fundamentals were being followed and as long as there is a harmony in the team, I didn’t interfere. I also learned to identify the quick learners, star performers and nurtured them as they were the ones who would eventually become the team’s influencers and motivators and made them as the internal coaches to continue this endeavor forever. I fostered a healthy relationship with multiple units in the team, for the team to function more effectively.

Responsibilities of an Agile Coach

  • Plays a mentoring or coaching role in the organization without being a part of the Scrum team
  • Most often this person is not a part of the Scrum team and an outsider (from outside the organization)
  • Guides the team members, without personal or political considerations
  • The person is an Agile expert
  • Is experienced in implementing Agile techniques in different cultures and environments
  • Able to run the complex and different sized Agile projects successfully

A Roadway from Agile Practitioner to Coach:-
The coaching experience gave me a sense of fulfillment as I would see mostly the team smiling and brimming with ideas for improvement constantly in the journey of self-reliance. This has helped me improve my personal traits to a greater extent and I feel that I’ve made a sincere attempt to embed myself into my organization towards enterprise agility.

Despite the resistance from the team members to change, I was able to win and influence them through my communication, empathy and logical reasoning skills. I truly believed coaching focuses on helping another person learn in ways that let him or her keep growing afterward. It is based on asking rather than telling, on provoking thought rather than giving directions and on holding a person accountable for his or her goals.

Ramkumar

Ramkumar Armugam

Blog Author

Ramkumar is an experienced Program Manager with 13+ years of success in leading all phases of diverse technology IT Projects in retail, e-commerce, insurance and pharma market research industries. He has more than 7+ years of experience in leading and executing projects and programs using agile and lean methodologies. He is currently working as Senior Manager in Cognizant Technology Solutions India Pvt Ltd and holds multiple certifications including PMP, PMI-ACP, CSM, CSPO, CSP and ICP-ACC. He has a zeal for project and program management and his current endeavor includes leading a large scale distributed product development team in delivering a world class product features in the area of Finance and HR domains for a large US retailer. He is a regular contributor to projectmanagement.com.

Join the Discussion

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Suggested Blogs

Scrum Master vs. Project Manager: Differences and Similarities

Organizations that are new to Agile and Scrum commit some deadly blunders. The most common and overlooked one is the lack of clarity of the roles of the Scrum Master and the Project Manager. This is more often seen in smaller Scrum teams, where these two discrete roles overlap.  There are of course similarities between Scrum Master and Project Manager roles. But that does not give way to ignoring the distinct differences between an Agile Project Manager and Scrum Master.  We have spaced out this article into various sections-    Scrum Master vs. Project Manager roles and responsibilities Scrum Master roles and responsibilities: Scrum Master is referred as a facilitator, who manages the teams that are implementing the Agile methodology. Scrum framework is the best framework for smaller teams of developers, who can break their work into a Sprint in order to get your project done at the end of every sprint.  The roles and responsibilities of the Scrum Master includes- Sprint planning  Scheduling the daily Scrum meeting Managing Scrum process responsibly Helping the Scrum teams to follow Scrum practices Removing barriers so the team can focus on their work Assisting with the Product Backlog Co-operating with Product Owner in designing Product Backlog items for the next Sprint Protecting the team from external distractions Recording and assisting to improve team dynamics   *Project Manager roles and responsibilities: Project manager’s role is to manage the projects and ensure that the project meets the requirements. The roles and responsibilities of the Project Manager are as follows- Defining project scope to the team Planning project target Preparing the work schedule for the team members Gathering requirements Defining the resource requirements for the project Preparing the budget for a project Assuring quality Mitigating the risks Monitoring the plans Getting user feedback Managing relationships with the client and the stakeholders Ending the project   Similarities between the Scrum Master and the Project Manager Project Manager and Scrum Master both are humans and they both make mistakes. But they both debug and learn from the mistakes. They both can communicate, receive feedback, mitigate the risks, and enable a great bonding within a team. Actually, neither the Project Manager nor the Scrum Master is the supreme authority. The Project Manager has to report to the client and the stakeholders, whereas the Scrum Master has to report to the Product Owner alongside the stakeholders and clients. Both Project Manager and the Scrum Master fail when they ignore the basic principles that are supposed to be adhered to. They fail when they not only neglect being professionals, but also when they are any less than skilled professionals. Sometimes, they may also fail when they disrespect the team members’ opinions. Differences between the Agile Project manager and Scrum Master While noting down the differences between the Project Manager and the Scrum Master, you will find out that the Project Manager plays the leadership role by leading a planning for the execution of the project. Scrum Master plays a support role for the team members, by working closely with the team and assuring that they are following Agile principles properly. Let’s look at the major differences between the PM and SM: Project Manager(PM) vs.Scrum Master(SM) Goals Has defined goals like- Completing the project on time, planned budget, and scope Makes sure that the team members are well trained to follow Agile practices appropriately. Also, SM coaches the Scrum teams and mentions the timeline to finish the project. Quality Assurance PM also knows the importance of quality, but doesn’t know how to achieve this. Usually, a consultant is hired to fix the errors. SM assures the quality and very well knows the importance of it. Team Size Project Managers like to make the things large. PM works with more people and a huge budget. In this way, they improve to Program Manager Scrum Master always tries to keep things smaller. They like to work in small teams irrespective of budget. Average Salary Rs.1,351,403 per year Rs 1,036,017 per year Job Description The job description of the Project Manager includes- Planning, creating budget and the related documents PM has to work with upper management to ensure a scope and direction of a project PM has to work with another department also, in case of emergency sometimes have to work themselves or instruct the team to finish a goal. The job description for Scrum Master includes- Resolves barriers and controls the Scrum processes. Making a team aware of Agile and Scrum to deliver successfully Facilitates the Scrum ceremonies Ensures that a project is running smoothly with the help of the tools Executes the Product Backlog as per the Product Owner prioritization Solves team conflicts with good communication skills Motivates the team Monitors the Scrum processes to increase efficiency   Scrum Master vs. Project Manager certification The Scrum Master and the Project Manager certifications are the two most popular certifications of the Agile and Waterfall methodologies.  Scrum.org report as of 30th April 2017 states that around 110,000+ people are  Scrum certified. Only 56% of the Project Management Specialists are holding a Project Manager Certificate, even in Big IT companies. This was revealed in a survey conducted by IBM.    Last words: Deciding between the Scrum Master and Project Manager certification is indeed a tough choice and entails a careful consideration of the prospects of each. Eventually, the role of a Scrum Master is proved as a ‘deciding factor’ of the successful projects. The Scrum Master and the Project Manager both have distinct roles. Both need particular skill-sets and a right person to make the work happen.       
Rated 4.0/5 based on 9 customer reviews
4030
Scrum Master vs. Project Manager: Differences and ...

Organizations that are new to Agile and Scrum comm... Read More

Transition From SAFe 4.0 to SAFe 4.5: The Changes In Sight

Around 2 years ago, Scaled Agile Inc. launched SAFe 4.0 as a methodology to broaden the existing Agile practices in the organizations. It soon gained a widespread popularity in the top organizations. But several barriers on a digital scale were preventing a full-fledged organization-level implementation of the new changes. So while organizations were engaged in acquiring new features in SAFe by encouraging people to do SAFe certification at different levels, the team at Scaled Agile Inc. were focussing on the framework that would completely align with the existing technology trends and the market needs.  The Challenge Dean Leffingwell, Director and Chief Methodologist at Scaled Agile Inc., mentioned in one of his articles about the most important tenets in SAFe, that can foster the quickest delivery once the same principles are adopted in the existing Scaled Agile Framework.  Due to the resulting complexities of the SAFe 4.0 framework, it was challenging to embark on the SAFe Implementation Roadmap. Hence, organizations were seeking a path that can be specific and would require less efforts to achieve faster results. To overcome this challenge, Scaled Agile Inc. has released SAFe 4.5, the improved version of SAFe 4.0. It is the reflection of field research completed in the span of 1.5 years. The field research includes feedback from the clients and tons of implementations. SAFe 4.5 is leaner, more Agile and easily learnable as compared to its predecessors and better at yielding faster outcomes. The Vision What is new in SAFe 4.5? Let us discuss the major upgrades in the latest version of Scaled Agile- SAFe 4.5. The key areas of improvements are as follows: Flexibility and Configurability  Innovation with Lean Startup and Lean UX ­ Scalable DevOps & Continuous Delivery  Implementation Roadmap Backward compatibility  Before moving on to a detailed discussion on the new features in SAFe 4.5, it is important that you first know some of the best ways to implement Leading SAFe 4.5 in your organization.  1. Flexibility and Configurability: SAFe 4.5 configuration supports a wide range of development environments, from the simplest to the most complex one. This version is able to scale to meet the challenges of the growing organizations. SAFe 4.5 has come up with four new configurations, viz.-  Essential SAFe- Realizes the benefits for the organizations. Portfolio SAFe- Consists of preparing strategy and investment funding, Agile operations, and Lean governance.  Large solution- Builds big systems that include multiple ARTs and Suppliers. Full SAFe- Gives all Lean-Agile benefits to the larger enterprises. 2. Innovation with Lean Startup and Lean UX:­ The coordination of Lean startup and Lean UX in SAFe not only initiates investments in the form of Minimum Viable Product (MVP), but also the feedback is carried out from the customers in order to make valuable decisions more quickly.  3. Scalable DevOps & Continuous Delivery:  SAFe 4.5 integrated with Lean ‘hypothesis-build-measure-learn’ cycle and Scalable DevOps & Continuous Delivery, delivers more innovative solutions more briskly. Being a big enterprise, you can innovate various solution elements with the help of SAFe 4.5.  4. Implementation Roadmap: SAFe Implementation Roadmap describes a strategy and field experience based on the organizational change management. It also describes the critical moves that an organization can make in order to achieve long-term gains with SAFe and ensure early success in the project.   4.5  Backward compatible: A good news for all Agile teams is that SAFe 4.5 is backward compatible. Those who were implementing SAFe 4.0 principles can carry on with these without moving a rock in the current version as all the features of SAFe 4.0 are still in place. You just need to be familiar with the updated practices in SAFe 4.5.  Why is SAFe 4.5 Certification crucial? SAFe 4.5 certification renders the proficiency to effectively apply Scaled Agile Framework, Lean Thinking and Agile principles for product development flow in the enterprises. After the training, you can utilise your practical experience in implementing the SAFe framework in the scaled organizations. Nowadays, enterprises have started implementing SAFe, as they are getting more benefits like- Employee engagement,  Faster time to market,  Improved productivity and  Quality   Today, employees are seeking more meaningful and challenging jobs to keep abreast of the digitized world. Employees can shape their careers by taking part in training sessions and accessing various knowledgeable resources. Scaled Agile Inc. always believes in uplifting the status of the employees in this regard. The institute has an inventory of role-based courses and certifications.  Let us explore the myriad certification options available for SAFe 4.5: 1. SAFe Course: SAFe 4.5 for teams- SAFe 4.5 for teams is a professional course. It is a course for the dedicated team members who are skilled in designing, building, and testing in a very short timeline. Team members who are looking to working in SAFe environment as part of ART (Agile Release Train) should consider this training for understanding of Agile, Scrum & SAFe. Career prospect: Team member as part of ART in SAFe 2. SAFe Course: SAFe 4.5 Scrum Master (SSM) Certification Training- SAFe 4.5 Scrum Master Certification (SSM) is a team-based course, in which the Scrum Master helps teams to manage and deliver quality products implementing effective Agile practices. The Scrum Master is a servant-leader and carries out fruitful coordination between teams on the Agile Release Trains (ARTs) by conveying a status to the management when needed.      Career prospect: SAFe Advanced Scrum Master, SAFe Product Owner/Product Manager, SAFe Release Train Engineer, SAFe Agilist 3. SAFe Course: SAFe 4.5 Advanced Scrum Master course- The SAFe 4.5 Advanced Scrum Master course (SASM) allows Scrum Masters to use their broader knowledge of Agile and Scrum anti-patterns to facilitate multiple cross-team interactions, thereby getting rapid continuous value delivery.   Career prospect:  SAFe Product Owner/Product Manager, SAFe Release Train Engineer, SAFe Program Consultant, SAFe Agilist 4. SAFe Course: SAFe 4.5 Product Owner/ Product Manager- The SAFe 4.5 Product Owner/ Product Manager course based on Lean-Agile principles, allows Product Owner/ Product Manager to improve certain areas like architecture, funding, integrations, governance, and roles to get Agile success at an enterprise level.    Career prospect:  SAFe Agilist, SAFe Advanced Scrum Master, SAFe Release Train Engineer, SAFe Program Consultant 5. SAFe Course: SAFe 4.5 Release Train Engineer Certification course- The SAFe 4.5 Release Train Engineer Certification course (RTE) helps manage Agile Release Trains (ARTs) and value execution. These professionals become well equipped to remove obstacles, mitigate risks and yield continuous improvement. The RTE can be a part of the Lean-Agile transformation by training Managers, teams and Scrum Masters. Also, they help to adopt SAFe principles in the team. Career prospect: SAFe Agilist, SAFe Program Consultant 6. SAFe Course: Leading SAFe 4.5 training course- Leading SAFe 4.5 certification course is a complete solution for the scaled Agile teams in the organizations to carry out Agile transformation smoothly. Applying Lean-Agile principles is considered as the first step towards a change, which includes synchronizations, collaborations, and quality delivery.   Career prospect:  SAFe Release Train Engineer, SAFe Program Consultant Conclusion: In the aggregate, all the SAFe 4.0 features are updated in the new SAFe 4.5 version. Since SAFe 4.5 is fully backward compatible, you can learn a lot more things, and benefit from the additional features along with the principles present in the older version. With the different levels of SAFe 4.5 certifications, you can upgrade to new features to keep pace with the technology revolution. 
Rated 4.0/5 based on 20 customer reviews
Transition From SAFe 4.0 to SAFe 4.5: The Changes ...

Around 2 years ago, Scaled Agile Inc. launched SAF... Read More

How To Pass Leading SAFe® 4 Exam ?

Scaled Agile Framework is a roadmap that leads the organizations in implementing the Lean and Agile Practices. SAFe® includes the three foundational bodies of knowledge that are System Thinking, Lean Product Development, and Agile Software Development. It helps the organizations to improve themselves according to the business requirements, deals with challenges involved in developing and delivering ideal software and systems within a specified time. SAFe® practices are essential but, sometimes they can be complex and entail some challenges. It might be easy to deal with such challenges and move your enterprise towards SAFe® practices by becoming a professional SAFe® Agilist. Passing a SAFe® Agilist Certification exam proves that you are an expert in implementing Agile and improving the project you want to get involved in.Here, in this article, we will guide you through your Leading SAFe® 4 exam preparation.Firstly, the 2-day Leading SAFe® 4.6 training is the most crucial part of this certification. Join the course and ask all the doubts you have during the workshop without any hesitation. Make a note of all the important things which will be helpful for future references. After completing the course successfully, you should pass the exam to obtain SAFe® Agilist Certification.Exam DetailsFormat of the examThis is a web-based, timed, and closed book exam that will be conducted in English and delivered in the format of multiple choice questions. Upon completion of the Leading SAFe® training, candidates will get access to the exam within the SAFe® Community Platform. Candidates will have 90 minutes to finish the exam once it starts.The exam consists of 45 questions in total and you must answer a minimum of 34 questions correct out of 45. You can take the exam at any time and the fee for the first attempt will be included in the course registration fee only if the exam is taken within 30 days of course completion.Retake policy of the examIf the certification exam is not cleared in the first attempt, you can retake the exam again and again, but each retake costs $50.You can take the second attempt immediately after the first attemptYou need to wait for a minimum of 10 days to retake the exam for the third timeA minimum of 30-day wait is required to retake the exam fourth timeCandidates are not allowed to retake the exam, once they got a minimum passing score of 76% unless there are updates announced to the exam.Exam preparationThe exam is specifically designed to analyze the skills and knowledge of a particular candidate. Develop a study plan before going to take the exam.Here are a few important points you should remember-You should gain both practical and theoretical knowledge in order to pass the exam successfully.The course materials are more helpful to prepare for the exam and we at KnowledgeHut offer course materials authored by the Scaled Agile Academy. These materials can be used for referring the concepts that are presented during the training.Take the practice tests that are designed with the same level of difficulty, time duration, and the same number of questions. You can take the exam without any additional cost. The practice tests once completed, let’s you know the chapters you should study more in pink color. Study those topics again.  As a preparation, on scaledagileframework.com, on the big picture (framework) click on the words if have confusion/not sure and read the guidance article. It makes you prepare well for the main certification exam and boosts your confidence level.Choosing a right path takes you to important destinations in your career. Becoming a SAFe® 4 Agilist is a career path for many and it requires an excellent range of skills. The best institute guides you towards a bright career. So, choose the right and best institute that is authorized to do so and can help you reach your goals.
Rated 4.0/5 based on 15 customer reviews
3840
How To Pass Leading SAFe® 4 Exam ?

Scaled Agile Framework is a roadmap that leads the... Read More