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5 Best Data Processing Frameworks

“Big data Analytics” is a phrase that was coined to refer to amounts of datasets that are so large, traditional data processing software simply can’t manage them. For example, big data is used to pick out trends in economics, and those trends and patterns are used to predict what will happen in the future. These vast amounts of data require more robust computer software for processing, best handled by data processing frameworks. These are the top preferred data processing frameworks, suitable for meeting a variety of different needs of businesses. Hadoop This is an open-source batch processing framework that can be used for the distributed storage and processing of big data sets. Hadoop relies on computer clusters and modules that have been designed with the assumption that hardware will inevitably fail, and those failures should be automatically handled by the framework. There are four main modules within Hadoop. Hadoop Common is where the libraries and utilities needed by other Hadoop modules reside. The Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) is the distributed file system that stores the data. Hadoop YARN (Yet Another Resource Negotiator) is the resource management platform that manages the computing resources in clusters, and handles the scheduling of users’ applications. The Hadoop MapReduce involves the implementation of the MapReduce programming model for large-scale data processing. Hadoop operates by splitting files into large blocks of data and then distributing those datasets across the nodes in a cluster. It then transfers code into the nodes, for processing data in parallel. The idea of data locality, meaning that tasks are performed on the node that stores the data, allows the datasets to be processed more efficiently and more quickly. Hadoop can be used within a traditional onsite datacenter, as well as through the cloud. Apache Spark Apache Spark is a batch processing framework that has the capability of stream processing, as well, making it a hybrid framework. Spark is most notably easy to use, and it’s easy to write applications in Java, Scala, Python, and R. This open-source cluster-computing framework is ideal for machine-learning, but does require a cluster manager and a distributed storage system. Spark can be run on a single machine, with one executor for every CPU core. It can be used as a standalone framework, and you can also use it in conjunction with Hadoop or Apache Mesos, making it suitable for just about any business. Spark relies on a data structure known as the Resilient Distributed Dataset (RDD). This is a read-only multiset of data items that is distributed over the entire cluster of machines. RDDs operate as the working set for distributed programs, offering a restricted form of distributed shared memory. Spark is capable of accessing data sources like HDFS, Cassandra, HBase, and S3, for distributed storage. It also supports a pseudo-distributed local mode that can be used for development or testing. The foundation of Spark is Spark Core, which relies on the RDD-oriented functional style of programming to dispatch tasks, schedule, and handle basic I/O functionalities. Two restricted forms of shared variables are used: broadcast variables, which reference read-only data that has to be available for all the nodes, and accumulators, which can be used to program reductions. Other elements included in Spark Core are: Spark SQL, which provides domain-specific language used to manipulate DataFrames. Spark Streaming, which uses data in mini-batches for RDD transformations, allowing the same set of application code that is created for batch analytics to also be used for streaming analytics. Spark MLlib, a machine-learning library that makes the large-scale machine learning pipelines simpler. GraphX, which is the distributed graph processing framework at the top of Apache Spark. Apache Storm This is another open-source framework, but one that provides distributed, real-time stream processing. Storm is mostly written in Clojure, and can be used with any programming language. The application is designed as a topology, with the shape of a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG). Spouts and bolts act as the vertices of the graph. The idea behind Storm is to define small, discrete operations, and then compose those operations into a topology, which acts as a pipeline to transform data. Within Storm, streams are defined as unbounded data that continuously arrives at the system. Sprouts are sources of data streams that are at the edge of the topology, while bolts represent the processing aspect, applying an operation to those data streams. The streams on the edges of the graph direct data from one node to another. These bolts and sprouts define sources of information and allow batch, distributed processing of streaming data, in real-time. Samza Samza is another open-source framework that offers near a real-time, asynchronous framework for distributed stream processing. More specifically, Samza handles immutable streams, meaning transformations create new streams that will be consumed by other components without any effect on the initial stream. This framework works in conjunction with other frameworks, using Apache Kafka for messaging and Hadoop YARN for fault tolerance, security, and management of resources. Samza uses the semantics of Kafka to define how it handles streams. Topic refers to each stream of data that enters a Kafka system. Brokers are the individual nodes that are combined to make a Kafka cluster. A producer is any component that writes to a Kafka topic, and a consumer is any component that reads from a Kafka topic. Partitions are used to divide incoming messages in order to distribute a topic among the different nodes. Flink Flink is a hybrid framework, open-source, and stream processes, but can also manage batch tasks. It uses a high-throughput, low-latency streaming engine that is written in Java and Scala, and the runtime system that is pipelined allows for the execution of both batch and stream processing programs. The runtime also supports the execution of iterative algorithms natively. Flink’s applications are all fault-tolerant and can support exactly-once semantics. Programs can be written in Java, Scala, Python, and SQL, and Flink offers support for event-time processing and state management. The components of the stream processing model in Flink include streams, operators, sources, and sinks. Streams are immutable, unbounded datasets that go through the system. Operators are functions that are used on data streams to create other streams. Sources are the entry points for streams that enter into the system. Sinks are places where streams flow out of the Flink system, either into a database or into a connection to another system. Flink’s batch processing system is really just an extension of the stream processing model. Flink does not provide its own storage system, however, so that means you will have to use it in conjunction with another framework. That should not be a problem, as Flink is able to work with many other frameworks. Data processing frameworks are not intended to be one-size-fits-all solutions for businesses. Hadoop was originally designed for massive scalability, while Spark is better with machine learning and stream processing. A good IT services consultant can evaluate your needs and offer advice. What works for one business may not work for another, and to get the best possible results, you may find that it’s a good idea to use different frameworks for different parts of your data processing.
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5 Best Data Processing Frameworks

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5 Best Data Processing Frameworks

Big data Analytics” is a phrase that was coined to refer to amounts of datasets that are so large, traditional data processing software simply can’t manage them. For example, big data is used to pick out trends in economics, and those trends and patterns are used to predict what will happen in the future. These vast amounts of data require more robust computer software for processing, best handled by data processing frameworks.

These are the top preferred data processing frameworks, suitable for meeting a variety of different needs of businesses.

Hadoop

This is an open-source batch processing framework that can be used for the distributed storage and processing of big data sets. Hadoop relies on computer clusters and modules that have been designed with the assumption that hardware will inevitably fail, and those failures should be automatically handled by the framework.

There are four main modules within Hadoop. Hadoop Common is where the libraries and utilities needed by other Hadoop modules reside. The Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) is the distributed file system that stores the data. Hadoop YARN (Yet Another Resource Negotiator) is the resource management platform that manages the computing resources in clusters, and handles the scheduling of users’ applications. The Hadoop MapReduce involves the implementation of the MapReduce programming model for large-scale data processing.

Hadoop operates by splitting files into large blocks of data and then distributing those datasets across the nodes in a cluster. It then transfers code into the nodes, for processing data in parallel. The idea of data locality, meaning that tasks are performed on the node that stores the data, allows the datasets to be processed more efficiently and more quickly. Hadoop can be used within a traditional onsite datacenter, as well as through the cloud.

Apache Spark

Apache Spark is a batch processing framework that has the capability of stream processing, as well, making it a hybrid framework. Spark is most notably easy to use, and it’s easy to write applications in Java, Scala, Python, and R. This open-source cluster-computing framework is ideal for machine-learning, but does require a cluster manager and a distributed storage system. Spark can be run on a single machine, with one executor for every CPU core. It can be used as a standalone framework, and you can also use it in conjunction with Hadoop or Apache Mesos, making it suitable for just about any business.

Spark relies on a data structure known as the Resilient Distributed Dataset (RDD). This is a read-only multiset of data items that is distributed over the entire cluster of machines. RDDs operate as the working set for distributed programs, offering a restricted form of distributed shared memory. Spark is capable of accessing data sources like HDFS, Cassandra, HBase, and S3, for distributed storage. It also supports a pseudo-distributed local mode that can be used for development or testing.

The foundation of Spark is Spark Core, which relies on the RDD-oriented functional style of programming to dispatch tasks, schedule, and handle basic I/O functionalities. Two restricted forms of shared variables are used: broadcast variables, which reference read-only data that has to be available for all the nodes, and accumulators, which can be used to program reductions. Other elements included in Spark Core are:

  • Spark SQL, which provides domain-specific language used to manipulate DataFrames.
  • Spark Streaming, which uses data in mini-batches for RDD transformations, allowing the same set of application code that is created for batch analytics to also be used for streaming analytics.
  • Spark MLlib, a machine-learning library that makes the large-scale machine learning pipelines simpler.
  • GraphX, which is the distributed graph processing framework at the top of Apache Spark.

Apache Storm

This is another open-source framework, but one that provides distributed, real-time stream processing. Storm is mostly written in Clojure, and can be used with any programming language. The application is designed as a topology, with the shape of a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG). Spouts and bolts act as the vertices of the graph. The idea behind Storm is to define small, discrete operations, and then compose those operations into a topology, which acts as a pipeline to transform data.

Within Storm, streams are defined as unbounded data that continuously arrives at the system. Sprouts are sources of data streams that are at the edge of the topology, while bolts represent the processing aspect, applying an operation to those data streams. The streams on the edges of the graph direct data from one node to another. These bolts and sprouts define sources of information and allow batch, distributed processing of streaming data, in real-time.

Samza

Samza is another open-source framework that offers near a real-time, asynchronous framework for distributed stream processing. More specifically, Samza handles immutable streams, meaning transformations create new streams that will be consumed by other components without any effect on the initial stream. This framework works in conjunction with other frameworks, using Apache Kafka for messaging and Hadoop YARN for fault tolerance, security, and management of resources.

Samza uses the semantics of Kafka to define how it handles streams. Topic refers to each stream of data that enters a Kafka system. Brokers are the individual nodes that are combined to make a Kafka cluster. A producer is any component that writes to a Kafka topic, and a consumer is any component that reads from a Kafka topic. Partitions are used to divide incoming messages in order to distribute a topic among the different nodes.

Flink

Flink is a hybrid framework, open-source, and stream processes, but can also manage batch tasks. It uses a high-throughput, low-latency streaming engine that is written in Java and Scala, and the runtime system that is pipelined allows for the execution of both batch and stream processing programs. The runtime also supports the execution of iterative algorithms natively. Flink’s applications are all fault-tolerant and can support exactly-once semantics. Programs can be written in Java, Scala, Python, and SQL, and Flink offers support for event-time processing and state management.

The components of the stream processing model in Flink include streams, operators, sources, and sinks. Streams are immutable, unbounded datasets that go through the system. Operators are functions that are used on data streams to create other streams. Sources are the entry points for streams that enter into the system. Sinks are places where streams flow out of the Flink system, either into a database or into a connection to another system. Flink’s batch processing system is really just an extension of the stream processing model.

Flink does not provide its own storage system, however, so that means you will have to use it in conjunction with another framework. That should not be a problem, as Flink is able to work with many other frameworks.

Data processing frameworks are not intended to be one-size-fits-all solutions for businesses. Hadoop was originally designed for massive scalability, while Spark is better with machine learning and stream processing. A good IT services consultant can evaluate your needs and offer advice. What works for one business may not work for another, and to get the best possible results, you may find that it’s a good idea to use different frameworks for different parts of your data processing.

Blake

Blake Davies

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Blake Davies is an IT specialist and a growth hacker. He often writes on topics of IT services support and general implications of IT in business. He's been in the industry for over five years.

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3 comments

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priya 10 Jul 2018

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Apache Kafka Vs Apache Spark: Know the Differences

A new breed of ‘Fast Data’ architectures has evolved to be stream-oriented, where data is processed as it arrives, providing businesses with a competitive advantage. - Dean Wampler (Renowned author of many big data technology-related books)Dean Wampler makes an important point in one of his webinars. The demand for stream processing is increasing every day in today’s era. The main reason behind it is, processing only volumes of data is not sufficient but processing data at faster rates and making insights out of it in real time is very essential so that organization can react to changing business conditions in real time.And hence, there is a need to understand the concept “stream processing “and technology behind it. So, what is Stream Processing?Think of streaming as an unbounded, continuous real-time flow of records and processing these records in similar timeframe is stream processing. AWS (Amazon Web Services) defines “Streaming Data” is data that is generated continuously by thousands of data sources, which typically send in the data records simultaneously, and in small sizes (order of Kilobytes). This data needs to be processed sequentially and incrementally on a record-by-record basis or over sliding time windows and used for a wide variety of analytics including correlations, aggregations, filtering, and sampling.In stream processing method, continuous computation happens as the data flows through the system.Stream processing is highly beneficial if the events you wish to track are happening frequently and close together in time. It is also best to utilize if the event needs to be detected right away and responded to quickly.There is a subtle difference between stream processing, real-time processing (Rear real-time) and complex event processing (CEP). Let’s quickly look at the examples to understand the difference. Stream Processing: Stream processing is useful for tasks like fraud detection and cybersecurity. If transaction data is stream-processed, fraudulent transactions can be identified and stopped before they are even complete.Real-time Processing: If event time is very relevant and latencies in the second's range are completely unacceptable then it’s called Real-time (Rear real-time) processing. For ex. flight control system for space programsComplex Event Processing (CEP): CEP utilizes event-by-event processing and aggregation (for example, on potentially out-of-order events from a variety of sources, often with large numbers of rules or business logic).We have multiple tools available to accomplish above-mentioned Stream, Realtime or Complex event Processing. Spark Streaming, Kafka Stream, Flink, Storm, Akka, Structured streaming are to name a few. We will try to understand Spark streaming and Kafka stream in depth further in this article. As historically, these are occupying significant market share. Apache Kafka Stream: Kafka is actually a message broker with a really good performance so that all your data can flow through it before being redistributed to applications. Kafka works as a data pipeline.Typically, Kafka Stream supports per-second stream processing with millisecond latency.  Kafka Streams is a client library for processing and analyzing data stored in Kafka. Kafka streams can process data in 2 ways. Kafka -> Kafka: When Kafka Streams performs aggregations, filtering etc. and writes back the data to Kafka, it achieves amazing scalability, high availability, high throughput etc.  if configured correctly. It also does not do mini batching, which is “real streaming”.Kafka -> External Systems (‘Kafka -> Database’ or ‘Kafka -> Data science model’): Typically, any streaming library (Spark, Flink, NiFi etc) uses Kafka for a message broker. It would read the messages from Kafka and then break it into mini time windows to process it further. Representative view of Kafka streaming: Note:Sources here could be event logs, webpage events etc. etc. DB/Models would be accessed via any other streaming application, which in turn is using Kafka streams here. Kafka Streams is built upon important stream processing concepts such as properly distinguishing between event time and processing time, windowing support, and simple (yet efficient) management of application state. It is based on many concepts already contained in Kafka, such as scaling by partitioning.Also, for this reason, it comes as a lightweight library that can be integrated into an application.The application can then be operated as desired, as mentioned below: Standalone, in an application serverAs a Docker container, or Directly, via a resource manager such as Mesos.Why one will love using dedicated Apache Kafka Streams?Elastic, highly scalable, fault-tolerantDeploy to containers, VMs, bare metal, cloudEqually viable for small, medium, & large use casesFully integrated with Kafka securityWrite standard Java and Scala applicationsExactly-once processing semanticsNo separate processing cluster requiredDevelop on Mac, Linux, WindowsApache Spark Streaming:Spark Streaming receives live input data streams, it collects data for some time, builds RDD, divides the data into micro-batches, which are then processed by the Spark engine to generate the final stream of results in micro-batches. Following data flow diagram explains the working of Spark streaming. Spark Streaming provides a high-level abstraction called discretized stream or DStream, which represents a continuous stream of data. DStreams can be created either from input data streams from sources such as Kafka, Flume, and Kinesis, or by applying high-level operations on other DStreams. Internally, a DStream is represented as a sequence of RDDs. Think about RDD as the underlying concept for distributing data over a cluster of computers. Why one will love using Apache Spark Streaming?It makes it very easy for developers to use a single framework to satisfy all the processing needs. They can use MLib (Spark's machine learning library) to train models offline and directly use them online for scoring live data in Spark Streaming. In fact, some models perform continuous, online learning, and scoring.Not all real-life use-cases need data to be processed at real real-time, few seconds delay is tolerated over having a unified framework like Spark Streaming and volumes of data processing. It provides a range of capabilities by integrating with other spark tools to do a variety of data processing.  Spark Streaming Vs Kafka StreamNow that we have understood high level what these tools mean, it’s obvious to have curiosity around differences between both the tools. Following table briefly explain you, key differences between the two. Sr.NoSpark streamingKafka Streams1Data received form live input data streams is Divided into Micro-batched for processing.processes per data stream(real real-time)2Separated processing Cluster is requriedNo separated processing cluster is requried.3Needs re-configuration for Scaling Scales easily by just adding java processes, No reconfiguration requried.4At least one semanticsExactly one semantics5Spark streaming is better at processing group of rows(groups,by,ml,window functions etc.)Kafka streams provides true a-record-at-a-time processing capabilities. it's better for functions like rows parsing, data cleansing etc.6Spark streaming is standalone framework.Kafka stream can be used as part of microservice,as it's just a library.Kafka streams Use-cases:Following are a couple of many industry Use cases where Kafka stream is being used: The New York Times: The New York Times uses Apache Kafka and Kafka Streams to store and distribute, in real-time, published content to the various applications and systems that make it available to the readers.Pinterest: Pinterest uses Apache Kafka and the Kafka Streams at large scale to power the real-time, predictive budgeting system of their advertising infrastructure. With Kafka Streams, spend predictions are more accurate than ever.Zalando: As the leading online fashion retailer in Europe, Zalando uses Kafka as an ESB (Enterprise Service Bus), which helps us in transitioning from a monolithic to a micro services architecture. Using Kafka for processing event streams enables our technical team to do near-real time business intelligence.Trivago: Trivago is a global hotel search platform. We are focused on reshaping the way travellers search for and compare hotels while enabling hotel advertisers to grow their businesses by providing access to a broad audience of travellers via our websites and apps. As of 2017, we offer access to approximately 1.8 million hotels and other accommodations in over 190 countries. We use Kafka, Kafka Connect, and Kafka Streams to enable our developers to access data freely in the company. Kafka Streams powers parts of our analytics pipeline and delivers endless options to explore and operate on the data sources we have at hand.Broadly, Kafka is suitable for microservices integration use cases and have wider flexibility.Spark Streaming Use-cases:Following are a couple of the many industries use-cases where spark streaming is being used: Booking.com: We are using Spark Streaming for building online Machine Learning (ML) features that are used in Booking.com for real-time prediction of behaviour and preferences of our users, demand for hotels and improve processes in customer support. Yelp: Yelp’s ad platform handles millions of ad requests every day. To generate ad metrics and analytics in real-time, they built the ad event tracking and analyzing pipeline on top of Spark Streaming. It allows Yelp to manage a large number of active ad campaigns and greatly reduce over-delivery. It also enables them to share ad metrics with advertisers in a timelier fashion.Spark Streaming’s ever-growing user base consists of household names like Uber, Netflix, and Pinterest.Broadly, spark streaming is suitable for requirements with batch processing for massive datasets, for bulk processing and have use-cases more than just data streaming. Dean Wampler explains factors to evaluation for tool basis Use-cases beautifully, as mentioned below: Sr.NoEvaluation CharacteristicResponse Time windowTypical Use Case Requirement1.Latency tolerancePico to Microseconds (Real Real time)Flight control system for space programs etc.Latency tolerance< 100 MicrosecondsRegular stock trading market transactions, Medical diagnostic equipment outputLatency tolerance< 10 millisecondsCredit cards verification window when consumer buy stuff onlineLatency tolerance< 100 millisecondshuman attention required Dashboards, Machine learning modelsLatency tolerance< 1 second to minutesMachine learning model trainingLatency tolerance1 minute and abovePeriodic short jobs(typical ETL applications)2.Evaluation CharacteristicTransaction/events frequencyTypical Use Case RequirementVelocity1M per secondNest Thermostat, Big spikes during specific time period.3Evaluation CharacteristicTypes of data processingNAData Processing Requirement1. SQLNA2. ETL3. Dataflow4. Training and/or Serving Machine learning modelsData Processing Requirement1. Bulk data processingNA2. Individual Events/Transaction processing4.Evaluation CharacteristicUse of toolNAFlexibility of implementation1. Kafka : flexible as provides library.NA2. Spark: Not flexible as it’s part of a distributed frameworkConclusionKafka Streams is still best used in a ‘Kafka -> Kafka’ context, while Spark Streaming could be used for a ‘Kafka -> Database’ or ‘Kafka -> Data science model’ type of context.Although, when these 2 technologies are connected, they bring complete data collection and processing capabilities together and are widely used in commercialized use cases and occupy significant market share. 
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Apache Kafka Vs Apache Spark: Know the Differences

A new breed of ‘Fast Data’ architectures has e... Read More

Apache Spark Vs Hadoop - Head to Head Comparison

Over the past few years, data science has been one of the most sought-after multidisciplinary fields in the world today. It has established itself as an essential component of numerous industries such as marketing optimisation, risk management, marketing analytics. fraud detection, agriculture, etc. Understandably, this has lead to increasing demand for resorting to different approaches to data.When we talk about Apache Spark and Hadoop, it is really difficult to compare them with each other. We should be aware that both possess important features in the world of data science and big data. Hadoop excels over Apache Spark in some business applications, but when processing speed and ease of use is taken into account, Apache Spark has its own advantages that make it unique. The most important thing to note is, neither of these two can replace each other. However, since they are compatible with each other, they can be used together to produce very effective results for many big data applications.To analyse how important these two platforms are, there is a set of parameters with which we can discuss their efficiencies such as performance, ease of use, cost, data processing, compatibility, fault tolerance, scalability, and security. In this article, we will talk about Apache Spark and Hadoop individually for a bit, followed by stressing these parameters to better understand their significance in data science and big data.What is Hadoop?Hadoop, also known as Apache Hadoop, is a project formed by Apache.org that includes a software library and a framework that enables the usage of simple programming models to distributed processing of large data sets (big data) across computer clusters. Hadoop is quite efficient in scaling up from single computer systems to a lot of commodity system, offering substantial local storage. Due to this, Hadoop is considered as an omnipresent heavyweight in the big data analytics space. There are modules that work together to form the Hadoop framework. Here are the main Hadoop framework modules:Hadoop CommonHadoop Distributed File System (HDFS)Hadoop YARNHadoop MapReduceHadoop’s core is based on the above four modules followed by many others like Ambari, Avro, Cassandra, Hive, Pig, Oozie, Flume, and Sqoop. These are responsible for improving and extending Hadoop’s power to big data applications and large data set processing.Hadoop is utilised by numerous companies using big data sets and analytics and is the de facto model for big data applications. Initially, it was designed to take care of crawling and searching billions of web pages and collecting their information into a database, This resulted in Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS), a distributed file system designed to run on commodity hardware and Hadoop MapReduce, a processing technique and a program model for distributed computing based on java.Hadoop comes handy when companies find data sets too large and complex to not being able to process the information in reasonably sufficient time. Since crawling and searching the web are text-based tasks, Hadoop MapReduce comes in handy as it is an exceptional text processing engine.An Overview of Apache SparkAn open-source distributed general-purpose cluster-computing framework, Apache Spark is considered as a fast and general engine for large-scale data processing. Compared to heavyweight Hadoop’s Big Data framework, Spark is very lightweight and faster by nearly 100 times. Although the facts say so, in fact, Spark runs up to 10 times faster on disk. Apart from that, it can perform batch processing but it really is good at streaming workloads, interactive queries, and machine-based learning.✓Streaming workloads✓Interactive queries✓Machine-based learning.Spark engine’s real-time data processing capability has a clear edge over Hadoop MapReduce’s disk-bound, batch processing one. Not only is Spark compatible with Hadoop and its modules, but it is also listed as a module on Hadoop’s project page. And because Spark can run in Hadoop clusters through YARN (Yet Another Resource Negotiator), it has its own page and a standalone mode. It can run as a Hadoop module and as a standalone solution which makes it difficult to make direct comparisons.Despite these facts, Spark is expected to diverge and might even replace Hadoop, especially in terms of faster access to processed data. Spark’s cluster computing feature enables it to compete with only Hadoop MapReduce and not the entire Hadoop ecosystem. That is why it can use HDFS despite not having its own distributed file system. To be concise, Hadoop MapReduce uses persistent storage whereas Spark uses Resilient Distributed Datasets (RDDs). What is RDD? This will be stressed in the Fault Tolerance section.The differences between Apache Spark and HadoopLet us have a look at the parameters using which we can compare the features of Apache Spark with Hadoop.Apache Spark vs Hadoop in a nutshellApache SparkParametersHadoopProcesses everything in memoryPerformance-wiseHadoop MapReduce uses batch processingHas user-friendly APIs for multiple programming languagesEase of UseHas add-ons such as Hive and PigSpark systems cost moreCostsHadoop MapReduce systems cost lesserShares every Hadoop MapReduce compatibilityCompatibilityCompliments Apache Spark seamlesslyHas GraphX, its own graph computation libraryData ProcessingHadoop MapReduce operates in sequential stepsSpark uses Resilient Distributed Datasets (RDDs)Fault ToleranceUtilises TaskTrackers to keep the JobTracker tickingComparatively lesser scalabilityScalabilityLarge ScalabilityProvides authentication via shared secret (password authentication)SecuritySupports Kerberos authenticationPerformance-wiseSpark is definitely faster when compared to Hadoop MapReduce. However, they cannot be compared because they perform processing in different styles. Spark is way faster because it processes everything in memory, even using disk for data that does not all fit into memory. The in-memory processing of Spark performs near real-time analytics for data from machine learning, log monitoring, marketing campaigns, Internet of Things sensors, security analytics, and social media sites. Hadoop MapReduce, on the other hand, utilises the batch-processing method so it understandably was never created for mesmerising speed. As a matter of fact, it was initially created to continuously gather information from websites during the times when data in or near real-time were not required.Ease of UseSpark does not only have a good reputation for its excellent performance, but it is also relatively easy to use along with providing additional support for languages like user-friendly APIs for Scala, Java, Python, and Spark SQL. Since Spark SQL is quite comparable to SQL 92, the user requires no additional knowledge to use it.Supported Languages:APIs for ScalaJavaPythonSpark SQL.Additionally, Spark is armed with an interactive mode to allow developers and users get instant feedback for questions and other actions. Hadoop MapReduce makes up for the lack of any interactive mode with add-ons like Hive and Pig, thus easing the workflow of Hadoop MapReduce.CostsApache Spark and Apache Hadoop MapReduce are both free open-source software.However, because Hadoop MapReduce’s processing is disk-based, it utilises standard volumes of memory. This results in companies buying faster disks with a lot of disk space to run Hadoop MapReduce. In stark contrast to this, Spark requires a lot of memory but compensates by settling with a standard amount of disk space running at standard speeds.Apache Spark and Apache Hadoop CompatibilityBoth Spark and Hadoop MapReduce are compatible with each other. Moreover, Spark shares every Hadoop MapReduce compatibility for data sources, file formats, and business intelligence tools via JDBC and ODBC.Data ProcessingHadoop MapReduce is a batch-processing engine. So how does it work? Well, it works in sequential steps.Step 1: Reads data from the clusterStep 2: Performs its operation on the dataStep 3: Writes the results back to the clusterStep 4: Reads updated data from the clusterStep 5: Performs the next data operationStep 6: Writes those results back to the clusterStep 7: Repeat.Spark performs in a similar manner, but the process doesn’t go on. It includes a single step and then to memory.Step 1: Reads data from the clusterStep 2: Performs its operation on the dataStep 3: Writes it back to the cluster.Moreover, Spark has GraphX, its own graph computation library. GraphX presents the same data as graphs and collections. Users have the option to use Resilient Distributed Datasets (RDDs) to transform and join graphs. This will be further addressed below in the Fault Tolerance section.Fault ToleranceThere are two different ways in which Hadoop MapReduce and Spark resolve the fault tolerance issue. Hadoop MapReduce utilises nodes like TaskTrackers to keep the JobTracker ticking. On the process being interrupted, the JobTracker reassigns every pending and in-progress operation to another TaskTracker. Although this process effectively provides fault tolerance, the completion times might get majorly affected even for operations having just a single failure.Spark, in this case, applies Resilient Distributed Datasets (RDDs), fault-tolerant collections of elements that can be operated side by side. References can be provided by RDDs in the form of datasets in an external storage system like shared filesystems, HDFS, HBase, or whatever available data source. This results in allowing a Hadoop InputFormat and Spark can create RDDs from every storage source that is backed by Hadoop. That covers local filesystems or one of those listed earlier.Below-mentioned is five main properties that an RDD possesses:A list of partitionsA function for computing each splitA list of dependencies on other RDDsA Partitioner for key-value RDDs by choice (provided that the RDD is hash-partitioned)Optionally, a list of preferred locations to compute each split on (e.g. block locations for an HDFS file)The persistence of RDDs to cache a dataset in memory across operations enables the speeding up of future actions by possibly ten folds. The cache of Spark is fault-tolerant, it will recomputed automatically by making use of the original transformations provided any partition of an RDD is lost.ScalabilityIn terms of scaling up, both Hadoop MapReduce and Spark are on equal terms in using the HDFS. Reports say that Yahoo holds a 42,000 node Hadoop cluster with no bounds while the most comprehensive Spark cluster holds 8,000 nodes. However, in order to support output expectations, the cluster sizes are expected to grow along with that of big data.SecurityKerberos authentication, considered to be quite hectic to manage is supported by Hadoop. Nevertheless, companies have been assisted by third-party vendors to leverage Active Directory Kerberos and LDAP for authentication and also allow data encrypt for in-flight and data at rest. Access control lists (ACLs) a traditional file permissions model are supported by Hadoop while it provides Service Level Authorization for user control in job submission, resulting in clients having the right permissions without any fail.For Spark though, it presently offers somewhat inadequate security as it provides authentication via shared secret (password authentication). However, if the user runs Spark on HDFS, then it can utilise HDFS ACLs and file-level permissions. Moreover, running Spark on YARN will enable the latter to have the capacity of using Kerberos authentication. That is the security takeaway from using Spark.  ConclusionApache Spark and Apache Hadoop form the perfect combination for business applications. Where Hadoop MapReduce has been a revelation in the big data market for businesses requiring huge datasets to be brought under control by commodity systems, Apache Spark’s speed and comparative ease of use compliments the low-cost operation involving Hadoop MapReduce.Like we discussed at the beginning of this article that neither of these two can replace one another, Spark and Hadoop form a lethal and effective symbiotic partnership. While Hadoop has features like a distributed file system that Spark does not have, the latter presents real-time, in-memory processing for the required data sets. Both Hadoop and Spark form the perfect combination for the ideal big data scenario. Rest assured, in this situation, both working in the same team is what goes in favour of big data professionals.You would be interested to know that Knowledgehut offers world-class training for Apache Spark and Hadoop. Feel free to check these courses to enhance your knowledge about both Apache Spark and Hadoop.
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Apache Spark Vs Hadoop - Head to Head Comparison

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Apache Spark Vs Apache Storm - Head To Head Comparison

In today’s world, the need for real-time data streaming is growing exponentially due to the increase in real-time data. With streaming technologies leading the world of Big Data, it might be tough for the users to choose the appropriate real-time streaming platform. Two of the most popular real-time technologies that might consider for opting are Apache Spark and Apache Storm. One major key difference between the frameworks Spark and Storm is that Spark performs Data-Parallel computations, whereas Storm occupies Task-Parallel computations. Read along to know more differences between Apache Spark and Apache Storm, and understand which one is better to adopt on the basis of different features. Comparison Table: Apache Spark Vs. Apache StormSr. NoParameterApache SparkApache Storm1.Processing  ModelBatch ProcessingMicro-batch processing2.Programming LanguageSupports lesser languages like Java, Scala.Support smultiple languages, such as Scala, Java, Clojure.3.Stream SourcesHDFSSpout4.MessagingAkka, NettyZeroMQ, Netty5.Resource ManagementYarn and Meson are responsible.Yarn and Mesos are responsible.6.Low LatencyHigher latency as compared to SparkBetter latency with lesser constraints7.Stream PrimitivesDStreamTuple, Partition8.Development CostSame code can be used for batch and stream processing.Same code cannot be used for batch and stream processing.9.State ManagementSupports State ManagementSupports State Management as well10.Message Delivery GuaranteesSupports one message processing mode: ‘at least once’.Supports three message processing mode: ‘at least once’, ‘at most once’, ‘exactly once’.11.Fault ToleranceIf a process fails, Spark restarts workers via resource managers. (YARN, Mesos)If a process fails, the supervisor process starts automatically.12.Throughput100k records per node per second10k records per node per second13.PersistenceMapStatePer RDD14.ProvisioningBasic monitoring using GangliaApache Ambaripache Spark: Apache Spark is a general-purpose, lighting fast, cluster-computing technology framework, used for fast computation on large-scale data processing. It can manage both batch and real-time analytics and data processing workloads.  Spark was developed at UC Berkeley in the year 2009. Apache Storm:Apache Storm is an open-source, scalable fault-tolerant, and real-time stream processing computation system. It is a framework for real-time distributed data processing, which focuses on stream processing or event processing. It can be used with any programming language and can be integrated using any queuing or database technology.  Apache Storm was developed by a team led by Nathan Marz at BackType Labs. Apache Spark Vs. Apache Storm1. Processing Model: Apache Storm supports micro-batch processing, while Apache Spark supports batch processing. 2. Programming Language:Storm applications can be created using multiple languages like Java, Scala and Clojure, while Spark applications can be created using Java and Scala.3. Stream Sources:For Storm, the source of stream processing is Spout, while that for Spark is HDFS. 4. Messaging:Storm uses ZeroMQ and Netty as its messaging layer while Spark is using a combination of Nettu and Akka for distributing the messages throughout the executors. 5. Resource Management:Yarn and Meson are responsible for resource management in Spark, while Yarn and Mesos are responsible for resource management in Storm. 6. Low Latency: Spark provides higher latency as compared to Apache Storm, whereas Storm can provide better latency with fewer restrictions.7. Stream Primitives:Spark provides with stream transforming operators which transform DStream into another, while Storm provides with various primitives which perform tuple level of processing at the stream level (functions, filters). 8. Development Cost:It is possible for Spark to use the same code base for both stream processing and batch processing. Whereas for Storm, the same code base cannot be used for both stream processing and batch processing.  9. State Management: The changing and maintaining state in Apache Spark can be updated via UpdateStateByKey, but no pluggable strategy can be applied in the external system for the implementation of state. Whereas Storm does not provide any framework for the storage of any intervening bolt output as a state. Hence, each application has to create a state for itself whenever required. 10. Message Delivery Guarantees (Handling the message level failures):Apache Spark supports only one message processing mode, viz, ‘at least once’, whereas Storm supports three message processing modes, viz, ‘at least once’ (Tuples are processed at least one time, but can be processed more than once), ‘at most once’  and ‘exactly once’ (T^uples are processed at least once). Storm’s reliability mechanisms are scalable, distributed and fault-tolerant. 11. Fault-Tolerant:Apache Spark and Apache Storm, both are fault tolerant to nearly the same extent. If a process fails in Apache Storm, then the supervisor process will restart it automatically, as the state management is managed by Zookeeper, while Spark restarts its workers with the help of resource managers, who may be Mesos, YARN or its separate manager.12. Ease of Development: In the case of Storm, there are effective and easy to use APIs which show that the nature of topology is DAG. The Storm tuples are written dynamically. In the case of Spark, it consists of Java and Scala APIs with practical programming, making topology code a bit difficult to understand. But since the API documentation and samples are easily available for the developers, it is now easier. Summing Up: Apache Spark Vs Apache StormApache Storm and Apache Spark both offer great solutions to solve the transformation problems and streaming ingestions. Moreover, both can be a part of a Hadoop cluster to process data. While Storm acts as a solution for real-time stream processing, developers might find it to be quite complex to develop applications due to its limited resources. The industry is always on a lookout for a generalized solution, which has the ability to solve all types of problems, such as Batch processing, interactive processing, iterative processing and stream processing. Keeping all these points in mind, this is where Apache Spark steals the limelight as it is mostly considered as a general-purpose computation engine, making it a highly demanding tool by IT professionals. It can handle various types of problems and provides a flexible environment to in. Moreover, developers find it to be easy and are able to integrate it well with Hadoop. 
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Apache Spark Vs Apache Storm - Head To Head Compar...

In today’s world, the need for real-time data st... Read More

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