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AngularJS: Top Use Cases and Reasons to Opt for This Tool

AngularJS represents a structural framework for dynamic web applications. It is an open-source, JavaScript-based front-end web platform primarily developed by Google and a consortium of individuals and companies to solve many of the challenges faced in the development of single-page applications.   AngularJSAngularJS offers flexibility in coding like no other framework due to its simple design architecture. In terms of simplicity, it helps beginners to get started and make improvements to their application projects easily. AngularJS also handles heavy web applications that are exceptionally well loaded with features and components. It allows you to use HTML as your template language and allows you to extend the syntax of HTML to clearly and succinctly express the components of your application. The data binding and dependency injections ensure that we do not need to write a big chunk of code which otherwise we would have ended in writing. And all happens inside the browser making it a perfect partner for any application. The next layer data binding frameworks gains popularity due to strong demand. The foremost known ones are: AngularJS KnockoutJS BackboneJS DurandalJS JavaScriptMVC AngularJS overview AngularJS is a platform and framework that uses HTML and TypeScript to build single-page client applications. The below diagram will give you fair idea of difference in traditional page life cycle vs Single page life cycle : AngularJS overviewThe AngularJS application is written using typescript. It introduces core and optional features when you import a collection of TypeScript libraries into your applications. The architecture of an AngularJS application is based on some fundamental principles. The basic building blocks are NgModules which provide the component compilation background. NgModules compile the related code into functional sets; a collection of NgModules define an AngularJS application. An AngularJS application often has at least one root module that enables bootstrapping, and usually has a lot more feature modules. We will not go into details as this is out of scope of this article but to give you better understanding of an AngularJS application ,let's look at below example where we are trying to calculate area of rectangle : <divng-appng-init="width=1;breadth=2"> <b>Area:</b> <div>     Width: <inputtype="number"min="0"ng-model="width"> </div> <div>     Breadth: <inputtype="number"min="0"ng-model="breadth"> </div> <div> <b>Area:</b> {{width * breadth}} </div> </div>This appears to be normal HTML, with some new markup. A file like this is called a Template in AngularJS. Once AngularJS launches the code, it uses the compiler to interpret and process this new markup from the template. The DOM that is loaded, transformed, and rendered is then called view. The Directives are the first kind of modern markup. We add special actions to items or attributes in the HTML. You would have noticed the new attribute ng-app which is a directive for initializing AngularJS apps automatically. AngularJS also defines an input element directive which adds additional behavior to the element. The directive ng-model stores / updates the value of the input field within / from a variable. Why AngularJS? AngularJS is backed by Google. This is a huge relief for developers to operate on a stable code base that will offer the application maximum support. it's a stable platform to focus on. Many frameworks are nowadays a pure bundling of existing resources. They are an integrated group of tools but they are not very elegant. AngularJS is the next generation platform where each tool was built to function in an integrated manner with any other tool. Please find below some reasons why AngularJS is considered as best among its competitors: MVC inbuilt support Most frameworks enforce MVC by asking you to break your app into MVC components and then allow you to write code to re-string them. This is a lot of work. As a developer we have to just split the framework into MVC components and leave everything to AngularJS for taking care. Declarative User Interface AngularJS uses HTML to describe the user interface within the program. HTML is a more concise and less complex declarative language than the procedural interpretation of the JavaScript interface HTML is also less brittle to reorganize than a JavaScript-written GUI, so things are less likely to break. And when the view is written in HTML, you can put in a lot more UI developers. Data models are POJO The POJO acronym for plain old java objects are being used as data models in AngularJS and it works without superfluous functions getter and setter. You can include and change properties straightforwardly and circle over objects and exhibits voluntarily. Your code will look a lot of cleaner and progressively instinctive, the way mother nature expected. Behaviors with Directive Directives are the way AngularJS brings added functionality to HTML. Imagine a world in which HTML has so many rich elements ( e.g. < accordion>, < grid>, < lightbox>, etc.) that we never have to manipulate a DOM to simulate them. To get some functionality out of the box, all that our app needs to do is assign attributes to items. Flexibility with filter Before displaying data on UI, filters filter the data and may include anything as simple as formatting decimal places on a list, reversing the order of an array, filtering a parameter-based array, or implementing pagination. Filters are designed to be stand-alone features, similar to instructions, independent from your device, but concerned only with data transformations. Less code All the points you have received up to now mean you 're getting to write less code. No need to write your own MVC pipeline. The view is described using more succinct, HTML. Without getters / setters, data models are easier to write. Data-binding means you don't have to manually insert data into the view. Also the directives are different from the software code, they can be written in parallel with limited integration issues by another team. Filters let you manipulate view level data without changing controllers. Unit testing ready The definition of AngularJS would be incomplete without speaking of its readiness for unit test. Dependency Injection (DI) links the whole of AngularJS together. Agular's unit tests will use dependency injection for unit testing .It mocks the data and injects into server. In reality, AngularJS already has a mock HTTP provider for controllers to insert fake server responses. It beats the more conventional way web apps are checked by creating individual test pages that activate a single feature and then communicate with it to see if it is working. Google assisted, and a great community of growth. Supported by IntelliJ IDEA and Visual Studio .NET IDEs. Limitations AngularJS is not a magic bullet. Some of its drawbacks are the backsides of its positive points, some of which are intrinsic to JavaScript inefficiency that could not be solved even with the strongest derivatives of its limitations are listed below: AngularJS is broad and complicated. With multiple ways to do the same thing, it's hard to tell which way is best for a particular task. Mastering AngularJS at the "Hello World" level takes significant effort. Different developers' coding styles and habits can complicate the integration of different components into a complete solution. When the project expands over time, you will most likely need to throw away current implementations and build new ones using different approaches. AngularJS implementations are poor in scale. More than 2,000 watchers will seriously lag behind the UI. This limits the complexity of your AngularJS forms , especially large data grids and lists. Best use cases of AngularJS If you want to build smart lightweight applications, AngularJS is your best bet. This TypeScript-based framework helps you to build interactive SPAs that are safe, maintainable, and easy to check. Some of the popular use cases for AngularJS are as follows: YouTube PlayStation three app for video streaming Anyone who likes to play video games would not have skipped the PlayStation 3 version of YouTube. Considering the vast popularity of YouTube, a structure will be needed. Because Google owns AngularJS, it has been leveraged to introduce a brand-new version of YouTube on PlayStation 3. The flexible architecture has helped Google reinvent the PS3 experience by replacing the traditional operating method with a fully new one.  They replaced mouse movements with basic keystrokes. With AngularJS usability, the features of native apps like YouTube PS3 can be extensively leveraged. AngularJS has made a greater contribution in playback video and smooth scrolling on the YouTube PS3. It's the latest ultra-modern and seamless experience of AngularJS, experienced by the crowd of gamers. eCommerce applications like T-Mobile T-Mobile discovered that its customers had to wait for content to be loaded while connecting to the app. So, to make it quicker and less complicated, they used AngularJS server-side rendering to reduce the time. They also used AngularJS so that they could use HTML parsing for search engine purposes.  This leading telecommunications leader has had tremendous success in their eCommerce app, which has generated a phenomenal search engine traffic. With AngularJS, the application interface has been revamped and turned into a smooth and powerful app. Real-time Data Application like weather.com Weather.com is one of the most popular real-time weather update websites. The credit for its success is given to AngularJS 's modular functionality of modules and directories that enable you to use the features of the app on mobile and smartphone devices.  The framework enables developers to build customizable widgets based on the device's specific needs. Using real-time data and dynamically presenting it made it available on the Web using AngularJS technology. What projects don’t need AngularJS AngularJS is super heroic, but there are situations where you can't use AngularJS. Websites with Static Content Small websites with lower targets and static content. These types of websites are better built with limited technical stacks and do not need to be used by AngularJS, as the technology will only add extra pieces of code that are not required by the website or a specific project. Example: landing pages, educational websites, event pages, etc. Limited Resources and Startups AngularJS is not a good idea to start with for small teams and limited resources. AngularJS needs the skillful tools necessary to solve fast problems in large-scale projects. Technology should also not be used for small projects; it can be developed with other available frameworks and does not require much technological facilitation. Game Apps and Heavy Analytical Apps AngularJS is not a gaming app. Other frameworks, such as React, can be used to build a highly interactive UI in games. AngularJS tests every document object model before it changes its position. It is not recommended to use AngularJS in any app which require strong complex mathematical analytics mostly which is used in gaming. Popular web apps built with AngularJS Sharing a list of some of the renowned web applications that are driven by a versatile and robust AngularJS framework: The Guardian The Guardian is a leading designer and publisher, winning a variety of competitions in these fields. The Guardian website UI is created as an AngularJS app.Guardian.com PayPal Papal is one of the world's largest Internet payment firms. This is another one of the big websites that use AngularJS.Paypal.com JetBlue JetBlue is one of the most famous airline companies in the United States as the online airline portal. The new edition of the JetBlue website uses AngularJS.Lego Lego is one of the world's leading producers of play materials. Its products are traded global and can be virtually explored at www.LEGO.com.Lego.com NetflixNetflixNetflix is an American MNC entertainment company. It focuses on and offers streaming media and video on demand online and DVD by mail.FreelancerFreelancer.com Freelancer – the global leading online workplace where understanding businesses and professional service provider go to work!WeatherWeather.com Weather.com is one of the top weather forecasting online report websites. It is also one of the biggest websites using AngularJS.YouTube for PS3YouTube App on PlayStation Owned by Google, YouTube is mainly used for video hosting and sharing. This is being developed using AngularJS framework. ConclusionWe can conclude that the AngularJS web app development framework surely has a wide range of powerful features that gives AngularJS an edge over its competitors like ReactJS. This is one of the primary reasons large-scale businesses are opting for AngularJS as their preferred choice of web development platform. To summarize the key points about AngularJS. It is easy to learn and master. It makes application stable and fast. A bunch of useful features in one framework. There are tons of reasons why you should choose AngularJS for your next web app. The World loves it. We mastered it.Crack the code. Explore our live online workshops on Angular and become a pro today!

AngularJS: Top Use Cases and Reasons to Opt for This Tool

7K
  • by Ashish Kumar
  • 25th Jul, 2020
  • Last updated on 15th Mar, 2021
  • 10 mins read
AngularJS: Top Use Cases and Reasons to Opt for This Tool

AngularJS represents a structural framework for dynamic web applications. It is an open-source, JavaScript-based front-end web platform primarily developed by Google and a consortium of individuals and companies to solve many of the challenges faced in the development of single-page applications.   AngularJSAngularJS

AngularJS offers flexibility in coding like no other framework due to its simple design architecture. In terms of simplicity, it helps beginners to get started and make improvements to their application projects easily. AngularJS also handles heavy web applications that are exceptionally well loaded with features and components. It allows you to use HTML as your template language and allows you to extend the syntax of HTML to clearly and succinctly express the components of your application. The data binding and dependency injections ensure that we do not need to write a big chunk of code which otherwise we would have ended in writing. And all happens inside the browser making it a perfect partner for any application. The next layer data binding frameworks gains popularity due to strong demand. The foremost known ones are: 

  • AngularJS 
  • KnockoutJS 
  • BackboneJS 
  • DurandalJS 
  • JavaScriptMVC 

AngularJS overview 

AngularJS is a platform and framework that uses HTML and TypeScript to build single-page client applications. The below diagram will give you fair idea of difference in traditional page life cycle vs Single page life cycle : 

AngularJS overview AngularJS overview

The AngularJS application is written using typescript. It introduces core and optional features when you import a collection of TypeScript libraries into your applications. The architecture of an AngularJS application is based on some fundamental principles. The basic building blocks are NgModules which provide the component compilation background. NgModules compile the related code into functional sets; a collection of NgModules define an AngularJS application. An AngularJS application often has at least one root module that enables bootstrapping, and usually has a lot more feature modules. We will not go into details as this is out of scope of this article but to give you better understanding of an AngularJS application ,let's look at below example where we are trying to calculate area of rectangle : 

<divng-appng-init="width=1;breadth=2">
<b>Area:</b>
<div>
    Width: <inputtype="number"min="0"ng-model="width">
</div>
<div>
    Breadth: <inputtype="number"min="0"ng-model="breadth">
</div>
<div>
<b>Area:</b> {{width * breadth}}
</div>
</div>

This appears to be normal HTML, with some new markup. A file like this is called a Template in AngularJS. Once AngularJS launches the code, it uses the compiler to interpret and process this new markup from the template. The DOM that is loaded, transformed, and rendered is then called view. The Directives are the first kind of modern markup. We add special actions to items or attributes in the HTML. You would have noticed the new attribute ng-app which is a directive for initializing AngularJS apps automatically. AngularJS also defines an input element directive which adds additional behavior to the element. The directive ng-model stores / updates the value of the input field within / from a variable. 

Why AngularJS? 

AngularJS is backed by Google. This is a huge relief for developers to operate on a stable code base that will offer the application maximum support. it's a stable platform to focus on. Many frameworks are nowadays a pure bundling of existing resources. They are an integrated group of tools but they are not very elegant. AngularJS is the next generation platform where each tool was built to function in an integrated manner with any other tool. Please find below some reasons why AngularJS is considered as best among its competitors: 

MVC inbuilt support 

Most frameworks enforce MVC by asking you to break your app into MVC components and then allow you to write code to re-string them. This is a lot of work. As a developer we have to just split the framework into MVC components and leave everything to AngularJS for taking care. 

Declarative User Interface 

AngularJS uses HTML to describe the user interface within the program. HTML is a more concise and less complex declarative language than the procedural interpretation of the JavaScript interface HTML is also less brittle to reorganize than a JavaScript-written GUI, so things are less likely to break. And when the view is written in HTML, you can put in a lot more UI developers. 

Data models are POJO 

The POJO acronym for plain old java objects are being used as data models in AngularJS and it works without superfluous functions getter and setter. You can include and change properties straightforwardly and circle over objects and exhibits voluntarily. Your code will look a lot of cleaner and progressively instinctive, the way mother nature expected. 

Behaviors with Directive 

Directives are the way AngularJS brings added functionality to HTML. Imagine a world in which HTML has so many rich elements ( e.g. < accordion>, < grid>, < lightbox>, etc.) that we never have to manipulate a DOM to simulate them. To get some functionality out of the box, all that our app needs to do is assign attributes to items. 

Flexibility with filter 

Before displaying data on UI, filters filter the data and may include anything as simple as formatting decimal places on a list, reversing the order of an array, filtering a parameter-based array, or implementing pagination. Filters are designed to be stand-alone features, similar to instructions, independent from your device, but concerned only with data transformations. 

Less code 

All the points you have received up to now mean you 're getting to write less code. No need to write your own MVC pipeline. The view is described using more succinct, HTML. Without getters / setters, data models are easier to write. Data-binding means you don't have to manually insert data into the view. Also the directives are different from the software code, they can be written in parallel with limited integration issues by another team. Filters let you manipulate view level data without changing controllers. 

Unit testing ready 

The definition of AngularJS would be incomplete without speaking of its readiness for unit test. Dependency Injection (DI) links the whole of AngularJS together. Agular's unit tests will use dependency injection for unit testing .It mocks the data and injects into server. In reality, AngularJS already has a mock HTTP provider for controllers to insert fake server responses. It beats the more conventional way web apps are checked by creating individual test pages that activate a single feature and then communicate with it to see if it is working. 

  • Google assisted, and a great community of growth. 
  • Supported by IntelliJ IDEA and Visual Studio .NET IDEs. 

Limitations 

AngularJS is not a magic bullet. Some of its drawbacks are the backsides of its positive points, some of which are intrinsic to JavaScript inefficiency that could not be solved even with the strongest derivatives of its limitations are listed below: 

  • AngularJS is broad and complicated. With multiple ways to do the same thing, it's hard to tell which way is best for a particular task. Mastering AngularJS at the "Hello World" level takes significant effort. Different developers' coding styles and habits can complicate the integration of different components into a complete solution. 
  • When the project expands over time, you will most likely need to throw away current implementations and build new ones using different approaches. AngularJS implementations are poor in scale. 
  • More than 2,000 watchers will seriously lag behind the UI. This limits the complexity of your AngularJS forms , especially large data grids and lists. 

Best use cases of AngularJS 

If you want to build smart lightweight applications, AngularJS is your best bet. This TypeScript-based framework helps you to build interactive SPAs that are safe, maintainable, and easy to check. 

Some of the popular use cases for AngularJS are as follows: 

YouTube PlayStation three app for video streaming 

Anyone who likes to play video games would not have skipped the PlayStation 3 version of YouTube. Considering the vast popularity of YouTube, a structure will be needed. Because Google owns AngularJS, it has been leveraged to introduce a brand-new version of YouTube on PlayStation 3. The flexible architecture has helped Google reinvent the PS3 experience by replacing the traditional operating method with a fully new one.  

They replaced mouse movements with basic keystrokes. With AngularJS usability, the features of native apps like YouTube PS3 can be extensively leveraged. AngularJS has made a greater contribution in playback video and smooth scrolling on the YouTube PS3. It's the latest ultra-modern and seamless experience of AngularJS, experienced by the crowd of gamers. 

eCommerce applications like T-Mobile 

T-Mobile discovered that its customers had to wait for content to be loaded while connecting to the app. So, to make it quicker and less complicated, they used AngularJS server-side rendering to reduce the time. They also used AngularJS so that they could use HTML parsing for search engine purposes.  

This leading telecommunications leader has had tremendous success in their eCommerce app, which has generated a phenomenal search engine traffic. With AngularJS, the application interface has been revamped and turned into a smooth and powerful app. 

Real-time Data Application like weather.com 

Weather.com is one of the most popular real-time weather update websites. The credit for its success is given to AngularJS 's modular functionality of modules and directories that enable you to use the features of the app on mobile and smartphone devices.  

The framework enables developers to build customizable widgets based on the device's specific needs. Using real-time data and dynamically presenting it made it available on the Web using AngularJS technology. 

What projects don’t need AngularJS 

AngularJS is super heroic, but there are situations where you can't use AngularJS. 

Websites with Static Content 

Small websites with lower targets and static content. These types of websites are better built with limited technical stacks and do not need to be used by AngularJS, as the technology will only add extra pieces of code that are not required by the website or a specific project. Example: landing pages, educational websites, event pages, etc. 

Limited Resources and Startups 

AngularJS is not a good idea to start with for small teams and limited resources. AngularJS needs the skillful tools necessary to solve fast problems in large-scale projects. Technology should also not be used for small projects; it can be developed with other available frameworks and does not require much technological facilitation. 

Game Apps and Heavy Analytical Apps 

AngularJS is not a gaming app. Other frameworks, such as React, can be used to build a highly interactive UI in games. AngularJS tests every document object model before it changes its position. It is not recommended to use AngularJS in any app which require strong complex mathematical analytics mostly which is used in gaming. 

Popular web apps built with AngularJS 

Sharing a list of some of the renowned web applications that are driven by a versatile and robust AngularJS framework: 

The Guardian 

The Guardian is a leading designer and publisher, winning a variety of competitions in these fields. The Guardian website UI is created as an AngularJS app.

The Guardian Guardian.com 

PayPal 

Papal is one of the world's largest Internet payment firms. This is another one of the big websites that use AngularJS.

PayPal Paypal.com 

JetBlue 

JetBlue is one of the most famous airline companies in the United States as the online airline portal. The new edition of the JetBlue website uses AngularJS.

JetBlueLego 

Lego is one of the world's leading producers of play materials. Its products are traded global and can be virtually explored at www.LEGO.com.

LegoLego.com Netflix

NetflixNetflix

Netflix is an American MNC entertainment company. It focuses on and offers streaming media and video on demand online and DVD by mail.

Freelancer

FreelancerFreelancer.com 

Freelancer – the global leading online workplace where understanding businesses and professional service provider go to work!

Weather

WeatherWeather.com 

Weather.com is one of the top weather forecasting online report websites. It is also one of the biggest websites using AngularJS.

YouTube for PS3

YouTube for PS3YouTube App on PlayStation 

Owned by Google, YouTube is mainly used for video hosting and sharing. This is being developed using AngularJS framework. 

Conclusion

We can conclude that the AngularJS web app development framework surely has a wide range of powerful features that gives AngularJS an edge over its competitors like ReactJS. This is one of the primary reasons large-scale businesses are opting for AngularJS as their preferred choice of web development platform. 

To summarize the key points about AngularJS. 

  • It is easy to learn and master. 
  • It makes application stable and fast. 
  • A bunch of useful features in one framework. 
  • There are tons of reasons why you should choose AngularJS for your next web app. 
  • The World loves it. 
  • We mastered it.

Crack the code. Explore our live online workshops on Angular and become a pro today!

Ashish

Ashish Kumar

Senior Technology Specialist

Ashish is working as a Senior Technology Specialist in leading financial bank has more than 13 years of experience in developing enterprise applications

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The transporter variable is storing the mail object.  let transporter = nodemailer.createTransport({       host: "smtp-relay.sendinblue.com",       port: 587,       auth: {         user: process.env.USER,         pass: process.env.PASS,       },     });Open SMTP tab in your sendinmail account and cross check the host and port.In the auth object, we are passing the user and password from the environment variable.Send the mail using sendMail method.// send mail with defined transport object     let info = await transporter.sendMail({       from: from, // sender address       to: to, // list of receivers       subject: subject, // Subject line       text: text, // plain text body     });It returns a Promise of Send Message Info. In the end, it is returning the message id.  Express Route The sendEmail method is ready.  Let’s create an express route for it. This is the API endpoint using which we can access the sendEmail function. Open the mail-api.js in the code editor and paste the below code. constexpress = require("express");  constrouter = express.Router();  constsendMailMethod = require("../src/send-mail");  // Post request to send an email  router.post("/sendmail", async (req, res) => {  try {  constresult = awaitsendMailMethod(req.body);  // send the response  res.json({  status:true,  payload:result          });      } catch (error) {  console.error(error.message);  res.json({  status:false,  payload:"Something went wrong in Sendmail Route."          })      }  }) module.exports = router; The express framework provides a Router method to create different HTTP methods. Here, we have created a POST method to send the mail.  Instead of extracting the req.body parameters, we passed it as it is. The benefit of this approach is that if there is a change in argument or position, then we would not have to change it in all the places.  In the end, we are exporting the router. Now, this can be used in the server side. Express Server Now, it’s time to create a server and expose the routes on it. Open the index.js and paste the below code in it. "use strict";  constexpress = require("express");  constbodyParser = require("body-parser");  constcors = require("cors");  constapp = express();  constmailAPI = require("./routes/mail-api.js");  // Express body parser  app.use(cors());  app.use(bodyParser.json());  app.use(  bodyParser.urlencoded({  limit:"50mb",  extended:false,  parameterLimit:50000    })  );  // use the routes specified in route folder  app.use("/api/v1", mailAPI);  constport = process.env.PORT || 4444;  //listen to the server  app.listen(port, function () {  console.log(`listening to the port ${port} .....`);  }); The route is available on /api/v1/sendmail. Run the server. $ node index.js  listening to the port 4444 ..... Send an Email using API There are couple of methods to test the API. Using the Postmanor using the Curl command. Using Postman Install Postman on your machine if it is not installed. Create a POST request. URL: http://localhost:4444/api/v1/sendmail Content Type: JSON – Body tab > select JSON from dropdown Request Body:  {  "from": "hello@schadokar.dev",  "to": ["shubham@schadokar.dev"],  "subject": "Mail from Nodemailer",  "text": "Sending an email using nodemailer package."  } Hit Send. Make sure the server is running. On Success, the response returns the message id. Now, check your mailbox. If you are unable to find the mail in your Inbox, check the promotional mail folder. Using Curl CommandOpen the terminal or cmd.In the below curl command, change the parameters and enter.curl -X POST http://localhost:4444/api/v1/sendmail -H "Content-Type:application/json" -d '{"from": "hello@schadokar.dev","to": ["shubham@schadokar.dev"],"subject": "Mail from Nodemailer", "text": "Sending an email using nodemailer package."}'In this example, we have sent a simple text message to the recipient.  Nodemailer also gives you an option to send the message in HTML format. Mail template Open the mail.html in the code editor and paste the below code. 
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Learn Nodemailer Module in Node.js

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Full Stack Development – the Hottest Developer Skill for the Digital Age

With over 1.7 billion websites worldwide and 4.54 billion people using the internet actively, the need for heightened customer experience is on the rise. This is one of the major reasons why professionals who are adept at handling both the client-side and server-side interfaces of an application/website have become more important than ever. It has been estimated that by the next decade, there will be 300,000 new developer jobs in US. The Full Stack developer role is the No.1 position to be filled in 2020 according to 38% of hiring managers. This is closely followed by the role of a back-end developer.Handsome pay packagesThe average annual salary for a full-stack developer is about $110,737 per annum. Even beginners are offered about $58,000 per year and on the other hand, experienced professionals would earn up to $188,253 per year.These professionals are paid handsomely because enterprises are aware that a full stack developer does the job of two professionals (back-end and front-end developer).Plenty of growth opportunitiesAs per reports by The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, full-stack development job opportunities will increase from 135,000 to 853,000 by the year 2024. This is quite promising for aspiring full stack developers as an ocean of opportunities will be available for them in both startups as well as in multi-national organizations.Skills to become a Full Stack developerBecoming a full-fledged full stack developer is not child’s play. It takes a wide range of skills to become a good full stack developer. Below are the mandatory skills:Front-end skills: They should be well-versed with basic front-end technologies like HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript. They should also be comfortable working with front-end frameworks or third-party libraries such as JQuery, SASS, and AngularJS.Programming languages: They should be aces in at least one server-side coding language like Java, Python, Ruby or .Net.Databases: They should be efficient at handling data from databases like MySQL, MongoDB, Redis, Oracle and SQLServer.Version control systems (VCS): Full stack developers must be aware of Git so that they can make appropriate changes to the codebase.Basic design skills: Awareness about the basic prototype design and UI/UX design is essential to become a successful full stack developer.Server and API: They should have adequate exposure to Apache or Linux servers as well as web services.The way forward for Full Stack developersThe growing demand for full-stack developers is due to the ample benefits they offer to organizations. With technology evolving at a rapid pace, foresighted companies will keep adding them to their workforces. Full stack development became the No.1 developer skill because these developers are trained to multi-task various technologies and products. For aspiring full stack developers out there, now is the best time to make the most of these opportunities.Real products require real challenges. Check out our live online workshops and build your portfolio of projects.
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Full Stack Development – the Hottest Develop...

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What are React Component Lifecycle Methods

React is the most popular JavaScript library used to create interactive UI for web applications. It is a component-based library where different parts of a webpage can be encapsulated by components which are quite easy to create, manage and update. React allows us to create Single Page Applications which maintain the state of individual components on an app without having to reload it.  What are React Components? Developers who are new to JavaScript libraries and frameworks like React and Angular might ask the question, “What is a component?” Well, in very simple words, a component is a unit of code which includes JavaScript and HTML to build a part of a web page. It acts like a custom HTML element. It is reusable and can be as complex as you want it to be. For example, imagine that you are creating a very basic application with header, footer, and body. The header can be a component; the footer can be another component and the body can be yet another one or even might consist of multiple components.One of the most useful characteristics of React is its ability to integrate reusable components in a project. Reusability is the characteristic of a component which allows it to be used again, thereby reducing the amount of code a developer has to write. In our example here, the header can be a reusable component and can be used on all the pages of the application, which makes it easy to maintain and update. What does a component look like? Here is a simple example of a react component which contains a simple form. This is a class-based component. React also supports function-based components. As you can see in the code below, App is a user-defined class which inherit from React’s Component class and it has a render method which returns HTML code. As the name suggests, the render method returns and renders HTML to our browser. Every component has to return HTML which is rendered to the user’s browser by render method.import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    handleChange(event) {      this.setState({value: event.target.value});    }    render() {      return (                              Username:                                            Password:                                              );    }  }    export default App; In the above example, we have created a login form where there are 2 input boxes for the user to enter their username and password and then submit the form. We have assigned an event handler to form which will handle the login event in component.We have exported our component (using export default App) so that it can be rendered inside other components.This is a very basic example of component, but this can be as complex as you want it to be. But it is always advised to make your component independent and it should represent only a part of your page which can be reusable as well. It can return complex HTML included with JavaScript to handle complex features in your application.Component as a class React allows us to create component in the form of class as well as functions. While creating component as class you need to define a class which extends React.Component class. Component class has many features which the deriving class can use to maintain the state throughout the lifecycle. In case you want to have more custom features, you can create your own base component class which derives from Component class, and then your component classes can derive from your base component class. What do we mean by Component Lifecycle?Lifecycle of a component is the set of different stages (also known as lifecycle hooks) a component goes through while it is active. Stages could be when a component is created or when any changes are made to the component and many others. There are different methods executed by React at different points of time between when a component is created and at the end when it is destroyed and not in use. One such hook or method we have already seen in the code above, which is render(), and it is executed by React to render the component. We can override these methods and perform certain tasks in those methods, but every lifecycle serves a different purpose and it can be a nightmare if we ask them to do something that they aren’t supposed to or are not very good at. As a developer we should be aware of what those different stages are, what happens in those stages, in what order they execute and how we can make the best use of it. Understanding the lifecycle of components also helps us predict behavior of a component at different stages, which makes it easier to work with them. Managing a large set of components in an application can get you in trouble if you do not know how they work behind the scenes.Props and State Before we start with lifecycle hooks, lets understand what props and state are as they are most commonly used properties in component classes. Props It is a keyword which means properties. Props are used by callers of components to pass properties to the called component in a uni-directional flow. For example, if Parent component renders child component, it can define props and pass them to the child component which is then available and accessible by this.props. Another thing to note here is that props is a ready-only attribute which means data which is passed by parent should not be changed by client components. State State is a plan JavaScript object which defines the current state of any component. It is user defined and can be changed by lifecycle hooks. Ideally state should contain only data which is going to be rendered on DOM. State has getter and setter methods this.getState() and this.setState() which as the names suggest are used to access and update State. It is good practice to use setState method to update State and treat State as an immutable JavaScript object.Since there are many lifecycle hooks a component goes through, it would easier to understand if we start with the hooks which are executed when a component is created.Lifecycle hooks while Mounting [These lifecycle hooks are executed in order as listed, when a component is created]constructor(props) This is not a component lifecycle hook, but it is important to mention here and to be aware that Constructor is executed before it is mounted. Constructor receives props(properties of a component) as an argument which then can be passed to base class using super keyword if we define the constructor.  It is not mandatory to define constructor in component class, but if you do to perform any logic, then you need to call base constructor using super keyword.  Mainly constructors are used: To Setup local state of component with this.state To bind event handler methods. This is what a simple constructor would look like.import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    constructor(props) {      super(props);      this.state = { value: 0 };      this.handleClick = this.handleClick.bind(this);    }  } this.state should be called only inside constructor, to update the state in other methods use this.setState() method.  If constructor is required to do any heavy tasks, it will impact the performance of component, and you should be aware of this fact.  getDerivedStateFromProps(props, state) After constructor, this lifecycle hook is called before render method is executed. It is called while mounting as well as whenever props have changed. This is not very commonly used, only in cases where props can change, and you need to update state of the component. This is the only use case where you should implement this lifecycle hook.This method is executed on every render and cannot access component instance.import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    getDerivedStateFromProps(props, state) {      if (props.value !== state.prevValue) {        return {          prevValue: props.value        };      }      return null;    }    }render() This is the method which is required to be implemented in component class. It can access props and state. This is where you can write your html and jsx code. You can also render child components in this method which will then be rendered as well. Before completing the lifecycle of parent, lifecycle of all child components will be finished. All this html and jsx is then converted to pure html and outputs in DOM. JSX is a JavaScript extension which creates React elements. It looks more like template language but it is empowered by JavaScript which allows it to do a lot more. It can embed expressions . JSX has different set of attributes than what we have in html. For example, while creating html using JSX you need to use attribute “className” instead of class. This is what a typical render method looks like:import React, { Component } from 'react';   class App extends Component {   render() {         return (        Click to go Home { this.state.home }       Go to Home         );   } } Alternatively you can also use React.createElement() method to create html using JSX.const element = React.createElement(       'h1',       {className: 'hello'},       'Hello, world!'     );componentDidMount() As the name suggests, componentDidMount() is invoked after the component is mounted, which means html has been added to DOM tree. It is a very commonly used lifecycle hook, as it allows you to do a lot of things including causing side-effects, setting up any subscriptions, or loading data from external endpoints. If you setup any subscription using this method, make sure to unsubscribe them in componentWillUnmount() lifecycle hook. You shouldn’t update state in this method using this.State() as it may cause performance issues. For assigning initial state you should use constructor(). import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    componentDidMount(){    // Component is rendered and now external calls can be made.      this.getDataAfterTimeOut();    }    getDataAfterTimeOut(){      setTimeout(() => {        this.setState({          data: 'Data is fetched'        })      }, 1000)    }  } Lifecycle hooks while Updating [Next set of lifecycle hooks are executed while a component is updating which can be caused by changes to props(properties) or state of component. These are invoked in order as listed below.] getDerivedStateFromProps(props, state) We have already talked about this. This is invoked every time a component is changed or updated. Any changes in properties or state which causes the component to be changed will invoke this method. shouldComponentUpdate(nextProps, nextState) shouldComponentUpdate() is invoked before rendering (not on initial rendering) but only when props or state has been changed. Even though it is not recommended you can use this lifecycle hook to control the re-rendering. This can lead to performance issues as well as bugs, so be careful while doing that.  In this method nextProps can be compared with this.props and nextState can be compared with this.state. This method can return true or false depending on whether you want to continue rendering by skipping the next lifecycle hooks. In either case it can’t prevent re-rendering of child components. Note that this method defaults to true which will not skip rendering and next lifecycle hooks and continue with execution. import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    shouldComponentUpdate(nextProps, nextState) {  // This value will determine if lifecycle execution is to be skipped or continued.      return nextProps.value != this.props.value;    }  } render() After shouldComponentUpdate lifecycle hook render is called, which we have already talked about, it prepares html and jsx code which then outputs to DOM. getSnapshotBeforeUpdate() getSnapshotBeforeUpdate() is invoked right before the recent changes are added to DOM. This lifecycle hook gives us an opportunity to capture any details we need from the DOM before it is updated with new content. For example, if you want to know the scrolling position of the user, which should be restored after the DOM has changed. Use cases for this lifecycle, while rare, can be of great value at times. The snapshot value which is captured and returned by this hook is passed as a parameter to another lifecycle hook componentDidUpdate() which we will talk about next. import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    getSnapshotBeforeUpdate (prevProps, prevState) {  // implementing this method here allows us to capture the snapshot of current dom tree.      if (this.state.value != prevState.value) {        return table.scrollHeight - table.scrollTop      }      return null    }  }componentDIdUpdate(prevProps, prevState, snapshot) componentDidUpdate is invoked when DOM is updated. It is only called on update, not on initial rendering. You can use this method to make data requests after checking if props have changed. You can also call setSatate() in this method, but make sure to wrap that in a condition else it will cause an infinite loop forcing re-rendering and affecting performance issues. Also it should be noted that value for snapshot will only be available if you have implemented getSnapshotBeforeUpdate() in your component; else value for snapshot will be undefined. Here is an example of componentDidUpdate. This is a very basic example where we have captured snapshot by implementing get Snapshot Before Update lifecycle hook. After that componentDidUpdate is invoked and content is overwritten with new dataimport React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    getSnapshotBeforeUpdate(prevProps, prevState) {  // implementing this method here allows us to capture the snapshot of current dom tree.      document.getElementById("divContent").innerHTML =      "Before the update content is " + prevState.content;    }    componentDidUpdate(prevProps, prevState, snapshot) {  // You can access snapshot here to get data from dom before it was updated.      document.getElementById("divContent").innerHTML =      "New content updated " + this.state.content;    }  } import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    getSnapshotBeforeUpdate(prevProps, prevState) {  // implementing this method here allows us to capture the snapshot of current dom tree.      document.getElementById("divContent").innerHTML =      "Before the update content is " + prevState.content;    }    componentDidUpdate(prevProps, prevState, snapshot) {  // You can access snapshot here to get data from dom before it was updated.      document.getElementById("divContent").innerHTML =      "New content updated " + this.state.content;    }  } UnMounting [This is where lifecycle of a component ends when component is destroyed and removed from DOM. While Unmounting React gives us an opportunity to do something before component is destroyed, it can include clearing objects which have occupied memory to avoid memory leaks.] componentWillUnMount() componentWIllUnMount() is executed right after component is unmounted which means it is removed from DOM and destroyed. But before it is removed and destroyed, React gives us an opportunity to perform any cleanup we want to. For example, you might have setup subscriptions initially in componentDidMount() which you should unsubscribe when component is destroyed to avoid memory leaks in your application. You can also remove event listeners which were subscribed before. In this lifecycle hooks you should not update state of your component because component is not going to re-render now.import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    componentWillUnmount() {  // Component will be removed from DOM now.        // Unscubscribe subscriptions and events here.  document.removeEventListener("click", this.handleSubmit);    }  }Conclusion In this article we talked about React, its components and its different lifecycles. It is very crucial to understand the different opportunities that React provides through these lifecycle methods. There are many rules we need to follow while working with these hooks. Making them do something they can’t handle can cause performance issues or even infinite loops at times.  These lifecycle hooks work with props and state which are the most used properties of component class. Changes in state and props trigger different lifecycle hooks and even re-render the dom which is something you should be aware of. These lifecycle hooks are provided to intercept the different stages a component goes through and make the best use of it, but without understanding how they work it can break your application by causing performance issues or memory leaks. Hope this has been helpful. 
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What are React Component Lifecycle Methods

React is the most popular JavaScript library us... Read More