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Top 10 Advantages of Using React Framework

It was 1999 and the Internet was all about the squeaks and scratches of a dial-up modem. Back then, the world wide web was simple. You visit a website, you’d get a page, you’d read it in full and learnt something new. On the other hand, software was something that came on a disk and had to be installed on your computer.  Fast forward to today, and the concept of locally installed software is diminishing by the day. In its place, are rich desktop- like applications that run in a web browser such as Chrome. Who would’ve thought, the document flavoured internet of yesteryears would become a rich and interactive playground that is nothing short of a stellar experience? But here we are, with all our files, presentations, documents and virtually every facet of personal and professional lives sitting high up in the cloud, available everywhere, anywhere and anytime. There are even photoshop clones and 3D CAD applications that work in your web browser. The dream of building desktop class applications that do not need to be installed, isn’t new. In fact, this takes us back once again, to 1999 and a one-bedroom apartment atop Telegraph Hill in San Francisco where Marc Benioff and his colleagues created Salesforce, a CRM application that broke the mould and became the first ever Software-as-a-Service.  Today, almost everything can be done from the comfort of a web browser, thanks to rapid advancements in browsers and the way they work with HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript - the holy trinity that defines our web. Instead of writing the server rendered applications of yesteryears, today we have single page applications (SPAs) that are delivered to your browser where they live and run, offering the user a brilliant experience. But, just how do you build these comprehensive applications? JavaScript Frameworks, Libraries & More The brain, the logic and the action that makes a web application tick is obviously the result of a powerful JavaScript engine in your browser and the code you write. But just how do you write efficient JavaScript applications? Gone are the days when JavaScript was limited to form validators and other knick knacks. Today, we’ve got comprehensive applications spanning thousands of lines of code and with that kind of complexity, plain vanilla JavaScript suddenly starts to look really daunting. The prospect of writing everything from scratch isn’t an enticing formula and that’s not just limited to the JavaScript world. Look around and every language and platform offers frameworks and libraries that bring in opinions, battle tested workflows and an accelerated and developer friendly workflow to get the job done faster and better than wrestling with the core language alone.  In the world of web applications, we’ve come a long way from those days of jQuery which offered abstractions and helpers to quickly do what otherwise would take a lot of boilerplate code. But what jQuery couldn’t do is optimize the JavaScript - DOM bottleneck. You see, your JavaScript code may be fast, but it still has to talk to the Document Object Model (DOM) which gets your HTML document to play along. This is not the most efficient thing and has been the subject and reason for the existence of many web application frameworks and libraries. Besides that, most jQuery code ended up looking like code spaghetti which just worked until you had to visit it again for upgrades and feature additions.  This is where frameworks and libraries such as Angular, React, Vue, Ember and many more offer a vaccine and solution for building comprehensive applications that are way more than the scripts of yore. But out of all these, React, a JavaScript library by Facebook is clearly headed for victory.  React - The King While the market is saturated with frameworks and libraries that promise the gift of rapid application development and over-the-top performance, if there is one solution that stands out, it is React - a JavaScript library by Facebook, designed to help you rapidly build user interfaces and web applications. React is not strongly opinionated and this is just one of several reasons why its marching ahead of its peers, to become the numero uno choice for building high performance web applications. This is why, everyone from Facebook, Airbnb, Twitter to Microsoft and many more rely on React to power up their core products. So, let’s discover 10 reasons why React and not anything else should be on your menu, if you’re a web developer aiming to excel in the global web applications market: Composability: There was a time and place for monolithic applications. In simple words, huge applications were written so cohesively that scaling them up wasn’t really an easy task. Thankfully, these have passed into oblivion with the advent of the modern web application library or framework. React leads the pack by offering a component driven and composable architecture that allows developers to write micro units or features that can be composed together to create huge applications that can grow and scale without the fear of breaking apart.   Whenever a new feature needs to be added or upgraded, simply build a new component or work with an existing one and you’re effecting a change that is easy to maintain and powerful. What’s even better is that with React, a component could be as simple as a regular JavaScript function. So, you’re really leveraging your knowledge of JavaScript instead of rummaging around a complicated and opinionated syntax.  Turbocharged performance: React isn’t jQuery, which means that with React isn’t some fancy syntactic sugar over plain vanilla JavaScript. React brings true blue performance to the table by incorporating an in-memory representation of the browser’s real DOM. This is known as a virtual DOM and React uses it to perform all DOM manipulation computations before committing the final set of changes to the real DOM.  This means that the only time React will interact with the slow DOM is when it has to commit the final change which would be the sum total of multiple batched manipulations and changes, all of which are computed quickly in the Virtual DOM, in memory. This enables React to massively improve performance and is one of the reasons why React is used in some of the most performance heavy websites including Facebook itself. The underlying engine that delivers this performance is known as React Fiber. Data driven architecture: What if you could focus on the data that drives the UI rather than the intricacies of DOM manipulation? Well that is what React allows you to do with its data driven architecture where data drives changes to the UI. You modify data and the UI updates for you. This is known as stateful and declarative programming and is a delight to work with. It allows you to focus on what matters most - the data that the application works with and not the wiring that drives the underlying changes to DOM. Moreover, React features a unique one-way data flow architecture which makes it a breeze to understand how data moves even in complex applications that contain several hundred components. The amazing synthetic event system: React incorporates a unique synthetic event system that abstracts the underlying browser’s event system and provides a common and uniform API for developers to work with. As a result, you don’t have to worry about browser specific behaviours, nor do you have to worry about low level optimizations to ensure events are handled with performance. React manages all that for you.  Medium agnostic: React, the core library is not bound to a specific medium. This means that while you’d use React for building applications for the DOM i.e. your web browser, you can use React to build content for virtually any render-able medium. This is why we have the React Native project which allows you to leverage your knowledge of React for building native mobile apps for iOS and Android. And you can even write your own renderers for any specific medium or platform. Renders on the server too: One of the pain points associated with building JavaScript applications is the fact that unlike websites of the late 90s and the early 2000s, a JavaScript single page application renders in the user’s web browser, which means search engines find it difficult to crawl for content. This spells doom for search engine optimization and digital marketing initiatives, which are a critical part of any organization’s marketing strategy today. Thankfully, React offers a brilliant solution to this problem by allowing you to render apps on the server which are instantly visible to search engines and offer seamless transition to the faster browser version of the same application which delivers user end performance, which is why you picked React in the first place. The result is a win-win for all. Modern toolchain and a stellar developer experience: One of the things that serves as a barometer of success and prevalence in the tech world, is the developer experience. React offers not only a fantastic developer experience but also allows you to create your own toolchain for advanced case scenarios. As a developer, you work with modern and cutting-edge JavaScript features while the standard toolchain takes care of compilation, bundling and packaging. The end result is a fantastic developer experience that React developers can vouch for, making it the library of choice for the enterprise and start-up world alike. A vibrant ecosystem: React has been embraced by the open source ecosystem with such magnificence that a huge number of ecosystem tools and solutions are available that allow you to notch up your applications with advanced workflows such as a global state management, handling side effects and even complete frameworks that completely abstract all the intricacies of web application development and allow you, the developer to write React code to build complete and comprehensive applications quickly. With ecosystem solutions like React Router, Redux, Next.js, Redux Saga, React Three Fiber and several more, React is a 100% power packed solution with its own army of super hero solutions that allow you to do anything that your browser permits.  A clear and defined roadmap for the future: Unlike several other web application frameworks and libraries, React is a battle hardened solution that is used not only by Facebook but by thousands of leading enterprise organizations worldwide. Facebook has always offered a clear and defined roadmap for the evolution of React and they’ve always stood by it. This includes a stable API with very gradual deprecations which make it really easy for developers to evolve their products along with the evolution of React. A stable product means less or negligible surprises and is thus a key factor in choosing a library or framework for your next big enterprise product. Good old JavaScript: React doesn’t force you to learn a new language for writing web applications. It doesn’t even enforce an opinionated syntax. Your fundamental knowledge of modern JavaScript is enough to write brilliant web applications. At the same time, should you wish to leverage your knowledge of compile to JavaScript languages like TypeScript, then React offers first class support in its stellar toolchain. This again ties into a brilliant developer experience.  As you can see, React is a clear winner when it comes to choosing a weapon for building your next big web product. And why just web, with React, you can even learn to build mobile applications using JavaScript. With a rock-solid team at Facebook and a community of thousands of fans and developers worldwide, React is the most performant, stable and progressive solution to learn and adopt in this ultra-fast tech driven economy. 

Top 10 Advantages of Using React Framework

7K
Top 10 Advantages of Using React Framework

It was 1999 and the Internet was all about the squeaks and scratches of a dial-up modem. Back then, the world wide web was simple. You visit a website, you’d get a page, you’d read it in full and learnt something new. On the other hand, software was something that came on a disk and had to be installed on your computer 

Fast forward to today, and the concept of locally installed software is diminishing by the day. In its place, are rich desktop- like applications that run in a web browser such as Chrome. Who would’ve thought, the document flavoured internet of yesteryears would become a rich and interactive playground that is nothing short of a stellar experience? But here we are, with all our files, presentations, documents and virtually every facet of personal and professional lives sitting high up in the cloud, available everywhere, anywhere and anytime. There are even photoshop clones and 3D CAD applications that work in your web browser. 

The dream of building desktop class applications that do not need to be installed, isn’t new. In fact, this takes us back once again, to 1999 and a one-bedroom apartment atop Telegraph Hill in San Francisco where Marc Benioff and his colleagues created Salesforce, a CRM application that broke the mould and became the first ever Software-as-a-Service.  

Today, almost everything can be done from the comfort of a web browser, thanks to rapid advancements in browsers and the way they work with HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript - the holy trinity that defines our webInstead of writing the server rendered applications of yesteryears, today we have single page applications (SPAs) that are delivered to your browser where they live and run, offering the user a brilliant experience. But, just how do you build these comprehensive applications? 

JavaScript Frameworks, Libraries & More 

The brain, the logic and the action that makes a web application tick is obviously the result of a powerful JavaScript engine in your browser and the code you write. But just how do you write efficient JavaScript applications? Gone are the days when JavaScript was limited to form validators and other knick knacks. Today, we’ve got comprehensive applications spanning thousands of lines of code and with that kind of complexity, plain vanilla JavaScript suddenly starts to look really daunting. The prospect of writing everything from scratch isn’t an enticing formula and that’s not just limited to the JavaScript world. Look around and every language and platform offers frameworks and libraries that bring in opinions, battle tested workflows and an accelerated and developer friendly workflow to get the job done faster and better than wrestling with the core language alone 

In the world of web applications, we’ve come a long way from those days of jQuery which offered abstractions and helpers to quickly do what otherwise would take a lot of boilerplate code. But what jQuery couldn’t do is optimize the JavaScript - DOM bottleneck. You see, your JavaScript code may be fast, but it still has to talk to the Document Object Model (DOM) which gets your HTML document to play along. This is not the most efficient thing and has been the subject and reason for the existence of many web application frameworks and libraries. Besides that, most jQuery code ended up looking like code spaghetti which just worked until you had to visit it again for upgrades and feature additions.  

This is where frameworks and libraries such as Angular, React, Vue, Ember and many more offer a vaccine and solution for building comprehensive applications that are way more than the scripts of yore. But out of all these, React, a JavaScript library by Facebook is clearly headed for victory.  

React - The King 

While the market is saturated with frameworks and libraries that promise the gift of rapid application development and over-the-top performance, if there is one solution that stands out, it is React - a JavaScript library by Facebook, designed to help you rapidly build user interfaces and web applications. React is not strongly opinionated and this is just one of several reasons why its marching ahead of its peers, to become the numero uno choice for building high performance web applications. This is why, everyone from Facebook, Airbnb, Twitter to Microsoft and many more rely on React to power up their core products. So, let’s discover 10 reasons why React and not anything else should be on your menu, if you’re a web developer aiming to excel in the global web applications market: 

  • Composability: There was a time and place for monolithic applications. In simple words, huge applications were written so cohesively that scaling them up wasn’t really an easy task. Thankfully, these have passed into oblivion with the advent of the modern web application library or framework. React leads the pack by offering a component driven and composable architecture that allows developers to write micro units or features that can be composed together to create huge applications that can grow and scale without the fear of breaking apart.  
     
    Whenever a new feature needs to be added or upgraded, simply build a new component or work with an existing one and you’re effecting a change that is easy to maintain and powerful. What’s even better is that with React, a component could be as simple as a regular JavaScript function. So, you’re really leveraging your knowledge of JavaScript instead of rummaging around a complicated and opinionated syntax. 
     
  • Turbocharged performance: React isn’t jQuerywhich means that with React isn’t some fancy syntactic sugar over plain vanilla JavaScript. React brings true blue performance to the table by incorporating an in-memory representation of the browser’s real DOM. This is known as a virtual DOM and React uses it to perform all DOM manipulation computations before committing the final set of changes to the real DOM.  

This means that the only time React will interact with the slow DOM is when it has to commit the final change which would be the sum total of multiple batched manipulations and changes, all of which are computed quickly in the Virtual DOM, in memory. This enables React to massively improve performance and is one of the reasons why React is used in some of the most performance heavy websites including Facebook itself. The underlying engine that delivers this performance is known as React Fiber. 

  • Data driven architectureWhat if you could focus on the data that drives the UI rather than the intricacies of DOM manipulation? Well that is what React allows you to do with its data driven architecture where data drives changes to the UI. You modify data and the UI updates for you. This is known as stateful and declarative programming and is a delight to work with. It allows you to focus on what matters most - the data that the application works with and not the wiring that drives the underlying changes to DOM. Moreover, React features a unique one-way data flow architecture which makes it a breeze to understand how data moves even in complex applications that contain several hundred components. 

  • The amazing synthetic event system: React incorporates a unique synthetic event system that abstracts the underlying browser’s event system and provides a common and uniform API for developers to work with. As a result, you don’t have to worry about browser specific behaviours, nor do you have to worry about low level optimizations to ensure events are handled with performance. React manages all that for you.  

  • Medium agnostic: React, the core library is not bound to a specific medium. This means that while you’d use React for building applications for the DOM i.e. your web browser, you can use React to build content for virtually any render-able medium. This is why we have the React Native project which allows you to leverage your knowledge of React for building native mobile apps for iOS and Android. And you can even write your own renderers for any specific medium or platform. 

  • Renders on the server too: One of the pain points associated with building JavaScript applications is the fact that unlike websites of the late 90s and the early 2000s, a JavaScript single page application renders in the user’s web browser, which means search engines find it difficult to crawl for content. This spells doom for search engine optimization and digital marketing initiatives, which are a critical part of any organization’s marketing strategy today. Thankfully, React offers a brilliant solution to this problem by allowing you to render apps on the server which are instantly visible to search engines and offer seamless transition to the faster browser version of the same application which delivers user end performance, which is why you picked React in the first place. The result is a win-win for all. 

  • Modern toolchain and a stellar developer experience: One of the things that serves as a barometer of success and prevalence in the tech world, is the developer experience. React offers not only a fantastic developer experience but also allows you to create your own toolchain for advanced case scenarios. As a developer, you work with modern and cutting-edge JavaScript features while the standard toolchain takes care of compilation, bundling and packaging. The end result is a fantastic developer experience that React developers can vouch for, making it the library of choice for the enterprise and start-up world alike. 

  • vibrant ecosystem: React has been embraced by the open source ecosystem with such magnificence that a huge number of ecosystem tools and solutions are available that allow you to notch up your applications with advanced workflows such as a global state management, handling side effects and even complete frameworks that completely abstract all the intricacies of web application development and allow you, the developer to write React code to build complete and comprehensive applications quickly. With ecosystem solutions like React Router, Redux, Next.js, Redux Saga, React Three Fiber and several more, React is a 100% power packed solution with its own army of super hero solutions that allow you to do anything that your browser permits.  

  • A clear and defined roadmap for the future: Unlike several other web application frameworks and libraries, React is a battle hardened solution that is used not only by Facebook but by thousands of leading enterprise organizations worldwide. Facebook has always offered a clear and defined roadmap for the evolution of React and they’ve always stood by it. This includes a stable API with very gradual deprecations which make it really easy for developers to evolve their products along with the evolution of React. A stable product means less or negligible surprises and is thus a key factor in choosing a library or framework for your next big enterprise product. 

  • Good old JavaScript: React doesn’t force you to learn a new language for writing web applications. It doesn’t even enforce an opinionated syntax. Your fundamental knowledge of modern JavaScript is enough to write brilliant web applications. At the same time, should you wish to leverage your knowledge of compile to JavaScript languages like TypeScript, then React offers first class support in its stellar toolchain. This again ties into a brilliant developer experience.  

As you can see, React is a clear winner when it comes to choosing a weapon for building your next big web product. And why just web, with React, you can even learn to build mobile applications using JavaScript. With a rock-solid team at Facebook and a community of thousands of fans and developers worldwide, React is the most performant, stable and progressive solution to learn and adopt in this ultra-fast tech driven economy. 

KnowledgeHut

KnowledgeHut

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KnowledgeHut is an outcome-focused global ed-tech company. We help organizations and professionals unlock excellence through skills development. We offer training solutions under the people and process, data science, full-stack development, cybersecurity, future technologies and digital transformation verticals.
Website : https://www.knowledgehut.com

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Learn Nodemailer Module in Node.js

In this tutorial, we will learn how to send email in Node.js using the nodemailer npm package.For the email provider, we are going to use Sendinblue. Prerequisites Node.js (>v6.0.0 for nodemailer module) Code Editor (For Ex. VS Code, Atom) An account in SendinblueStart by creating a free account in Sendinblue. A Sendinblue free account offers 300 mails/day. Its setup is easy and straightforward. An introduction to Nodemailer Nodemailer, an open source project started in 2010, is annpm module for Node.js applications to send emails. Today, nodemailer is a de facto to send an email in Node.js. Highlights of Nodemailer It is a single module with zero dependencies  It supports HTML Content  Allows you to easily add attachments to messages Supports SMTP as default transport method; other supported transport methods are SES, Sendmail, Stream. OAuth2 authenticationGetting Started For this tutorial, I am using Nodejs v12.16.1 and VS Code as the Code Editor. Create a new directory nodemailer-example.  Open the terminal or cmd inside the directory and run  $ npminit --yes It will initialize a new npm package. Install dependencies Following different npm packages, we are going to use in this project. nodemailer – To send the mail express – To create APIs cors – To resolve the cross originresource sharing body-parser – To extract the body from the API request dotenv – To access the environment variables $ npm install --save nodemailer express cors body-parser dotenv This command will install all the dependencies. Now, we can start the coding. Project Structure Open the nodemailer-example in the code editor and create the following folders and files in it; not to worry, I will be explaining all the files and commands involved.  nodemailer-example    |- routes      |- mail-api.js    |- src      |- send-mail.js    |- template      |- mail.html    |- .env    |- index.js Sendinmail Setup Login to your Sendinmail account. From the top-left menu, select SMTP & API. Select the SMTP tab. Click on Create a new SMTP key. Copy the key at some safe place.  You can deactivate the SMTP key anytime. Now, open the .env file and create 2 key-value pair. USER=YOUREMAILADDRESS  PASS=xxxxxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx USER: The email address using which you created the sendinmail account. PASS:SMTP Key By using .env file we are not exposing the credentials to the web.  Using environment variables in the project is an industrial standard.  Source Code Open the send-mail.js in the editor. Copy and paste the below code in it."use strict";  require("dotenv").config();  constnodemailer = require("nodemailer");  /**   * sendEmail   * @param{Object}mailObj - Email information   * @param{String}from- Email address of the sender   * @param{Array}to- Array of recipients email address   * @param{String}subject - Subject of the email   * @param{String}text - Email body   */  constsendEmail = async (mailObj) => {  const{ from, to, subject, text } = mailObj;  try {  // Create a transporter  lettransporter = nodemailer.createTransport({  host:"smtp-relay.sendinblue.com",  port:587,  auth: {  user:process.env.USER,  pass:process.env.PASS,        },      });  // send mail with defined transport object  letinfo = awaittransporter.sendMail({  from:from, // sender address  to:to, // list of receivers  subject:subject, // subject line  text:text, // plain text body      });  console.log(`Message sent: ${info.messageId}`);  return`Message sent: ${info.messageId}`;    } catch (error) {  console.error(error);  thrownewError(  `Something went wrong in the sendmail method. Error: ${error.message}`      );    }  };  module.exports = sendEmail; Code Walk Through In the beginning, we are importing dotenv to get the environment variables from the .env file and nodemailer to send the email. The sendEmailfunction accepts an object. This object has from, to, subject, text fields. Please note that, from and USER must be same. The nodemailer.createTransportreturns a mail object. 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This is the API endpoint using which we can access the sendEmail function. Open the mail-api.js in the code editor and paste the below code. constexpress = require("express");  constrouter = express.Router();  constsendMailMethod = require("../src/send-mail");  // Post request to send an email  router.post("/sendmail", async (req, res) => {  try {  constresult = awaitsendMailMethod(req.body);  // send the response  res.json({  status:true,  payload:result          });      } catch (error) {  console.error(error.message);  res.json({  status:false,  payload:"Something went wrong in Sendmail Route."          })      }  }) module.exports = router; The express framework provides a Router method to create different HTTP methods. Here, we have created a POST method to send the mail.  Instead of extracting the req.body parameters, we passed it as it is. 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Full Stack Development – the Hottest Developer Skill for the Digital Age

With over 1.7 billion websites worldwide and 4.54 billion people using the internet actively, the need for heightened customer experience is on the rise. This is one of the major reasons why professionals who are adept at handling both the client-side and server-side interfaces of an application/website have become more important than ever. It has been estimated that by the next decade, there will be 300,000 new developer jobs in US. The Full Stack developer role is the No.1 position to be filled in 2020 according to 38% of hiring managers. This is closely followed by the role of a back-end developer.Handsome pay packagesThe average annual salary for a full-stack developer is about $110,737 per annum. Even beginners are offered about $58,000 per year and on the other hand, experienced professionals would earn up to $188,253 per year.These professionals are paid handsomely because enterprises are aware that a full stack developer does the job of two professionals (back-end and front-end developer).Plenty of growth opportunitiesAs per reports by The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, full-stack development job opportunities will increase from 135,000 to 853,000 by the year 2024. This is quite promising for aspiring full stack developers as an ocean of opportunities will be available for them in both startups as well as in multi-national organizations.Skills to become a Full Stack developerBecoming a full-fledged full stack developer is not child’s play. It takes a wide range of skills to become a good full stack developer. Below are the mandatory skills:Front-end skills: They should be well-versed with basic front-end technologies like HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript. They should also be comfortable working with front-end frameworks or third-party libraries such as JQuery, SASS, and AngularJS.Programming languages: They should be aces in at least one server-side coding language like Java, Python, Ruby or .Net.Databases: They should be efficient at handling data from databases like MySQL, MongoDB, Redis, Oracle and SQLServer.Version control systems (VCS): Full stack developers must be aware of Git so that they can make appropriate changes to the codebase.Basic design skills: Awareness about the basic prototype design and UI/UX design is essential to become a successful full stack developer.Server and API: They should have adequate exposure to Apache or Linux servers as well as web services.The way forward for Full Stack developersThe growing demand for full-stack developers is due to the ample benefits they offer to organizations. With technology evolving at a rapid pace, foresighted companies will keep adding them to their workforces. Full stack development became the No.1 developer skill because these developers are trained to multi-task various technologies and products. For aspiring full stack developers out there, now is the best time to make the most of these opportunities.Real products require real challenges. Check out our live online workshops and build your portfolio of projects.
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Full Stack Development – the Hottest Develop...

With over 1.7 billion websites worldwide and 4.54 ... Read More

What are React Component Lifecycle Methods

React is the most popular JavaScript library used to create interactive UI for web applications. It is a component-based library where different parts of a webpage can be encapsulated by components which are quite easy to create, manage and update. React allows us to create Single Page Applications which maintain the state of individual components on an app without having to reload it.  What are React Components? Developers who are new to JavaScript libraries and frameworks like React and Angular might ask the question, “What is a component?” Well, in very simple words, a component is a unit of code which includes JavaScript and HTML to build a part of a web page. It acts like a custom HTML element. It is reusable and can be as complex as you want it to be. For example, imagine that you are creating a very basic application with header, footer, and body. The header can be a component; the footer can be another component and the body can be yet another one or even might consist of multiple components.One of the most useful characteristics of React is its ability to integrate reusable components in a project. Reusability is the characteristic of a component which allows it to be used again, thereby reducing the amount of code a developer has to write. In our example here, the header can be a reusable component and can be used on all the pages of the application, which makes it easy to maintain and update. What does a component look like? Here is a simple example of a react component which contains a simple form. This is a class-based component. React also supports function-based components. As you can see in the code below, App is a user-defined class which inherit from React’s Component class and it has a render method which returns HTML code. As the name suggests, the render method returns and renders HTML to our browser. Every component has to return HTML which is rendered to the user’s browser by render method.import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    handleChange(event) {      this.setState({value: event.target.value});    }    render() {      return (                              Username:                                            Password:                                              );    }  }    export default App; In the above example, we have created a login form where there are 2 input boxes for the user to enter their username and password and then submit the form. We have assigned an event handler to form which will handle the login event in component.We have exported our component (using export default App) so that it can be rendered inside other components.This is a very basic example of component, but this can be as complex as you want it to be. But it is always advised to make your component independent and it should represent only a part of your page which can be reusable as well. It can return complex HTML included with JavaScript to handle complex features in your application.Component as a class React allows us to create component in the form of class as well as functions. While creating component as class you need to define a class which extends React.Component class. Component class has many features which the deriving class can use to maintain the state throughout the lifecycle. In case you want to have more custom features, you can create your own base component class which derives from Component class, and then your component classes can derive from your base component class. What do we mean by Component Lifecycle?Lifecycle of a component is the set of different stages (also known as lifecycle hooks) a component goes through while it is active. Stages could be when a component is created or when any changes are made to the component and many others. There are different methods executed by React at different points of time between when a component is created and at the end when it is destroyed and not in use. One such hook or method we have already seen in the code above, which is render(), and it is executed by React to render the component. We can override these methods and perform certain tasks in those methods, but every lifecycle serves a different purpose and it can be a nightmare if we ask them to do something that they aren’t supposed to or are not very good at. As a developer we should be aware of what those different stages are, what happens in those stages, in what order they execute and how we can make the best use of it. Understanding the lifecycle of components also helps us predict behavior of a component at different stages, which makes it easier to work with them. Managing a large set of components in an application can get you in trouble if you do not know how they work behind the scenes.Props and State Before we start with lifecycle hooks, lets understand what props and state are as they are most commonly used properties in component classes. Props It is a keyword which means properties. Props are used by callers of components to pass properties to the called component in a uni-directional flow. For example, if Parent component renders child component, it can define props and pass them to the child component which is then available and accessible by this.props. Another thing to note here is that props is a ready-only attribute which means data which is passed by parent should not be changed by client components. State State is a plan JavaScript object which defines the current state of any component. It is user defined and can be changed by lifecycle hooks. Ideally state should contain only data which is going to be rendered on DOM. State has getter and setter methods this.getState() and this.setState() which as the names suggest are used to access and update State. It is good practice to use setState method to update State and treat State as an immutable JavaScript object.Since there are many lifecycle hooks a component goes through, it would easier to understand if we start with the hooks which are executed when a component is created.Lifecycle hooks while Mounting [These lifecycle hooks are executed in order as listed, when a component is created]constructor(props) This is not a component lifecycle hook, but it is important to mention here and to be aware that Constructor is executed before it is mounted. Constructor receives props(properties of a component) as an argument which then can be passed to base class using super keyword if we define the constructor.  It is not mandatory to define constructor in component class, but if you do to perform any logic, then you need to call base constructor using super keyword.  Mainly constructors are used: To Setup local state of component with this.state To bind event handler methods. This is what a simple constructor would look like.import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    constructor(props) {      super(props);      this.state = { value: 0 };      this.handleClick = this.handleClick.bind(this);    }  } this.state should be called only inside constructor, to update the state in other methods use this.setState() method.  If constructor is required to do any heavy tasks, it will impact the performance of component, and you should be aware of this fact.  getDerivedStateFromProps(props, state) After constructor, this lifecycle hook is called before render method is executed. It is called while mounting as well as whenever props have changed. This is not very commonly used, only in cases where props can change, and you need to update state of the component. This is the only use case where you should implement this lifecycle hook.This method is executed on every render and cannot access component instance.import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    getDerivedStateFromProps(props, state) {      if (props.value !== state.prevValue) {        return {          prevValue: props.value        };      }      return null;    }    }render() This is the method which is required to be implemented in component class. It can access props and state. This is where you can write your html and jsx code. You can also render child components in this method which will then be rendered as well. Before completing the lifecycle of parent, lifecycle of all child components will be finished. All this html and jsx is then converted to pure html and outputs in DOM. JSX is a JavaScript extension which creates React elements. It looks more like template language but it is empowered by JavaScript which allows it to do a lot more. It can embed expressions . JSX has different set of attributes than what we have in html. For example, while creating html using JSX you need to use attribute “className” instead of class. This is what a typical render method looks like:import React, { Component } from 'react';   class App extends Component {   render() {         return (        Click to go Home { this.state.home }       Go to Home         );   } } Alternatively you can also use React.createElement() method to create html using JSX.const element = React.createElement(       'h1',       {className: 'hello'},       'Hello, world!'     );componentDidMount() As the name suggests, componentDidMount() is invoked after the component is mounted, which means html has been added to DOM tree. It is a very commonly used lifecycle hook, as it allows you to do a lot of things including causing side-effects, setting up any subscriptions, or loading data from external endpoints. If you setup any subscription using this method, make sure to unsubscribe them in componentWillUnmount() lifecycle hook. You shouldn’t update state in this method using this.State() as it may cause performance issues. For assigning initial state you should use constructor(). import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    componentDidMount(){    // Component is rendered and now external calls can be made.      this.getDataAfterTimeOut();    }    getDataAfterTimeOut(){      setTimeout(() => {        this.setState({          data: 'Data is fetched'        })      }, 1000)    }  } Lifecycle hooks while Updating [Next set of lifecycle hooks are executed while a component is updating which can be caused by changes to props(properties) or state of component. These are invoked in order as listed below.] getDerivedStateFromProps(props, state) We have already talked about this. This is invoked every time a component is changed or updated. Any changes in properties or state which causes the component to be changed will invoke this method. shouldComponentUpdate(nextProps, nextState) shouldComponentUpdate() is invoked before rendering (not on initial rendering) but only when props or state has been changed. Even though it is not recommended you can use this lifecycle hook to control the re-rendering. This can lead to performance issues as well as bugs, so be careful while doing that.  In this method nextProps can be compared with this.props and nextState can be compared with this.state. This method can return true or false depending on whether you want to continue rendering by skipping the next lifecycle hooks. In either case it can’t prevent re-rendering of child components. Note that this method defaults to true which will not skip rendering and next lifecycle hooks and continue with execution. import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    shouldComponentUpdate(nextProps, nextState) {  // This value will determine if lifecycle execution is to be skipped or continued.      return nextProps.value != this.props.value;    }  } render() After shouldComponentUpdate lifecycle hook render is called, which we have already talked about, it prepares html and jsx code which then outputs to DOM. getSnapshotBeforeUpdate() getSnapshotBeforeUpdate() is invoked right before the recent changes are added to DOM. This lifecycle hook gives us an opportunity to capture any details we need from the DOM before it is updated with new content. For example, if you want to know the scrolling position of the user, which should be restored after the DOM has changed. Use cases for this lifecycle, while rare, can be of great value at times. The snapshot value which is captured and returned by this hook is passed as a parameter to another lifecycle hook componentDidUpdate() which we will talk about next. import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    getSnapshotBeforeUpdate (prevProps, prevState) {  // implementing this method here allows us to capture the snapshot of current dom tree.      if (this.state.value != prevState.value) {        return table.scrollHeight - table.scrollTop      }      return null    }  }componentDIdUpdate(prevProps, prevState, snapshot) componentDidUpdate is invoked when DOM is updated. It is only called on update, not on initial rendering. You can use this method to make data requests after checking if props have changed. You can also call setSatate() in this method, but make sure to wrap that in a condition else it will cause an infinite loop forcing re-rendering and affecting performance issues. Also it should be noted that value for snapshot will only be available if you have implemented getSnapshotBeforeUpdate() in your component; else value for snapshot will be undefined. Here is an example of componentDidUpdate. This is a very basic example where we have captured snapshot by implementing get Snapshot Before Update lifecycle hook. After that componentDidUpdate is invoked and content is overwritten with new dataimport React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    getSnapshotBeforeUpdate(prevProps, prevState) {  // implementing this method here allows us to capture the snapshot of current dom tree.      document.getElementById("divContent").innerHTML =      "Before the update content is " + prevState.content;    }    componentDidUpdate(prevProps, prevState, snapshot) {  // You can access snapshot here to get data from dom before it was updated.      document.getElementById("divContent").innerHTML =      "New content updated " + this.state.content;    }  } import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    getSnapshotBeforeUpdate(prevProps, prevState) {  // implementing this method here allows us to capture the snapshot of current dom tree.      document.getElementById("divContent").innerHTML =      "Before the update content is " + prevState.content;    }    componentDidUpdate(prevProps, prevState, snapshot) {  // You can access snapshot here to get data from dom before it was updated.      document.getElementById("divContent").innerHTML =      "New content updated " + this.state.content;    }  } UnMounting [This is where lifecycle of a component ends when component is destroyed and removed from DOM. While Unmounting React gives us an opportunity to do something before component is destroyed, it can include clearing objects which have occupied memory to avoid memory leaks.] componentWillUnMount() componentWIllUnMount() is executed right after component is unmounted which means it is removed from DOM and destroyed. But before it is removed and destroyed, React gives us an opportunity to perform any cleanup we want to. For example, you might have setup subscriptions initially in componentDidMount() which you should unsubscribe when component is destroyed to avoid memory leaks in your application. You can also remove event listeners which were subscribed before. In this lifecycle hooks you should not update state of your component because component is not going to re-render now.import React, { Component } from 'react';  class App extends Component {    componentWillUnmount() {  // Component will be removed from DOM now.        // Unscubscribe subscriptions and events here.  document.removeEventListener("click", this.handleSubmit);    }  }Conclusion In this article we talked about React, its components and its different lifecycles. It is very crucial to understand the different opportunities that React provides through these lifecycle methods. There are many rules we need to follow while working with these hooks. Making them do something they can’t handle can cause performance issues or even infinite loops at times.  These lifecycle hooks work with props and state which are the most used properties of component class. Changes in state and props trigger different lifecycle hooks and even re-render the dom which is something you should be aware of. These lifecycle hooks are provided to intercept the different stages a component goes through and make the best use of it, but without understanding how they work it can break your application by causing performance issues or memory leaks. Hope this has been helpful. 
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What are React Component Lifecycle Methods

React is the most popular JavaScript library us... Read More