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Difference between Scrum and SAFe®️

Scrum and Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe®️), both function under the Agile values and principles. Though there are very small differences between Scrum and SAFe®, it is very important to have a clear understanding of the same. Scrum is a framework which is based on the values and principles of Agile, whereas SAFe® is a framework which implements Scrum at an enterprise level. Let us have a look at the differences between Scrum and SAFe®. Quick Differences between Scrum and SAFe® :Sr. No.ScrumSAFe®️1.Deals will small, collocated, cross-functional teams.Deals with big, multi-geography teams.2.Scrum is adopted by the Agile Teams.Adopted by enterprises as a whole, not just a team. (extension of Scrum)3.The middle management plays no role.Program and Portfolio management are two important tiers of SAFe®️.4.Basic construct is the Scrum Team.Basic construct is the Agile Release Train. (ART)5.Scrum misses out various essential aspects.With SAFe®️, all possible features and aspects of an organisation can be managed.While Scrum is an Agile way to manage software development, SAFe®️ is an enterprise-level establishment method.The major difference between the two depends on the way they choose to handle their work. In simple words, Scrum is basically used to organise small teams, while SAFe®️ is used to organise the whole organization. Moreover, Scrum tends to miss many important aspects that SAFe®️ manages to contain.Scrum sounds simple in concepts but is hard to execute from the core.Scrum:Scrum is an iterative method of product development that breaks down a project into small segments, which are then completed by small cross-functional teams within a defined period of time.  It focuses on a regular rhythm of delivery and relies on cross-functional teams, some specific supporting roles and a set of ceremonies to complete the delivery of the project.To plan, organize, administer, and optimize a process, Scrum heavily depends on three roles:Product Owner: He is responsible to plan, organize, and make communication with the company.Scrum Master: It is the responsibility of a Scrum Master to look after the job during the sprints.Scrum Team: The main objective of the Scrum Team is the execution of the prescribed job for each sprint.SAFe®️:It stands for ‘Scalable Agile Framework’. It is an approach which consumes the whole enterprise and not just a team. SAFe®️ scales Scrum to make it work for bigger enterprises and has bigger teams working on the same product than what Scrum recommends. SAFe®️ has described three levels in an organisation, viz Portfolio, Program, and Team. This structure is widely accepted in large organizations as it has a tiered approach for delivery of its work. Unlike Scrum, it focuses on retrospect and releases planning as well, so that improvements can be made. The three important parts of SAFe® are:Lean Product Development Agile Software Development System ThinkingTo summarize, Agile is a mindset, a way of working; Scrum is a framework based on Agile values and principles, while SAFe®️ is a scaling framework that implements Scrum at an enterprise level. To Conclude:The major difference between Scrum and SAFe®️ agile methods lie in the way they take into practice. SAFe®️ has been developed in such a manner that it fills the gap that Scrum had left behind. SAFe®️ focuses on release planning and retrospect for improvement, which Scrum lacks.

Difference between Scrum and SAFe®️

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Difference between Scrum and SAFe®️

Scrum and Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe®️), both function under the Agile values and principles. Though there are very small differences between Scrum and SAFe®, it is very important to have a clear understanding of the same. Scrum is a framework which is based on the values and principles of Agile, whereas SAFe® is a framework which implements Scrum at an enterprise level.

 Let us have a look at the differences between Scrum and SAFe®. 

Quick Differences between Scrum and SAFe® :

Sr. No.ScrumSAFe®️
1.Deals will small, collocated, cross-functional teams.Deals with big, multi-geography teams.
2.Scrum is adopted by the Agile Teams.Adopted by enterprises as a whole, not just a team. (extension of Scrum)
3.The middle management plays no role.Program and Portfolio management are two important tiers of SAFe®️.
4.Basic construct is the Scrum Team.Basic construct is the Agile Release Train. (ART)
5.Scrum misses out various essential aspects.With SAFe®️, all possible features and aspects of an organisation can be managed.

While Scrum is an Agile way to manage software development, SAFe®️ is an enterprise-level establishment method.

The major difference between the two depends on the way they choose to handle their work. In simple words, Scrum is basically used to organise small teams, while SAFe®️ is used to organise the whole organization. Moreover, Scrum tends to miss many important aspects that SAFe®️ manages to contain.

Scrum sounds simple in concepts but is hard to execute from the core.

Scrum:

Scrum is an iterative method of product development that breaks down a project into small segments, which are then completed by small cross-functional teams within a defined period of time.  It focuses on a regular rhythm of delivery and relies on cross-functional teams, some specific supporting roles and a set of ceremonies to complete the delivery of the project.

To plan, organize, administer, and optimize a process, Scrum heavily depends on three roles:

Different types of scrum roles

  • Product Owner: He is responsible to plan, organize, and make communication with the company.
  • Scrum Master: It is the responsibility of a Scrum Master to look after the job during the sprints.
  • Scrum Team: The main objective of the Scrum Team is the execution of the prescribed job for each sprint.

SAFe®️:

It stands for ‘Scalable Agile Framework’. It is an approach which consumes the whole enterprise and not just a team. SAFe®️ scales Scrum to make it work for bigger enterprises and has bigger teams working on the same product than what Scrum recommends. SAFe®️ has described three levels in an organisation, viz Portfolio, Program, and Team. This structure is widely accepted in large organizations as it has a tiered approach for delivery of its work. Unlike Scrum, it focuses on retrospect and releases planning as well, so that improvements can be made. 

The three important parts of SAFe® are:

  • Lean Product Development 
  • Agile Software Development 
  • System Thinking

To summarize, Agile is a mindset, a way of working; Scrum is a framework based on Agile values and principles, while SAFe®️ is a scaling framework that implements Scrum at an enterprise level. 

To Conclude:

The major difference between Scrum and SAFe®️ agile methods lie in the way they take into practice. SAFe®️ has been developed in such a manner that it fills the gap that Scrum had left behind. SAFe®️ focuses on release planning and retrospect for improvement, which Scrum lacks.

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KnowledgeHut is an outcome-focused global ed-tech company. We help organizations and professionals unlock excellence through skills development. We offer training solutions under the people and process, data science, full-stack development, cybersecurity, future technologies and digital transformation verticals.
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As an example, we see that test story 4 and 2 as well as a bug have been dragged to sprint 1 as displayed in the image below.Please note as part of sprint planning session, details like Story Assignee, story points and hourly estimates can be filled in the stories using the fields available. Also, in case the story owner wants to highlight the individual tasks they intend to perform as part of working on the story like Analysis, Coding, Review etc or in case multiple team members are working on a single story then to highlight individual work assignments, the option of creating tasks can be used. Tasks can be created just like stories, as mentioned above. It is similar to work breakdown in traditional models.What needs to be made sure is that before marking the sprint planning as being complete, all the stories have been pulled in sprint and assigned and estimated in terms of story points or hours or both, according to the approach the teams have decided to take. All the sub tasks that have been created, can optionally be assigned. If desired, these subtasks can also be estimated. Once all this is done, the Scrum Master can then mark sprint planning as complete and proceed to start the sprint.  As we know that before sprint planning, a goal is provided by the PO to the team. The same goal can be added in the sprint. Just select the three dots option besides the sprint on right side and select edit sprint and you will be able to enter the sprint goal.  4. Starting Sprint: Once the planning is complete and activities like estimations, assignments and tasking have been done, it is time to start the sprint. This is simple to do. In the backlog, there is a “Start Sprint” button. Once you click on it, a dialog box appears where you can verify sprint goal and set a duration for the sprint. After reviewing the details, you can click on “Start” and we are good to go.  5. in Progress:  Once the sprint has started, you can navigate to the “Active Sprint” section to visualize the progress on the stories in the sprint. Team members can update the stories to depict statuses from “To Do”, “In Progress” and “Done” and also update their daily hours in the stories in case teams are estimating in terms of hours.  6. Completing/Closing Sprint:  On the last day of the sprint, it is important to mark the ongoing sprint as closed in JIRA so that next sprint can be planned and started.  All the items which are marked done are considered complete. Anything pending to be completed is either moved to the next sprint or to backlog in consultation with the PO.  Step 1: In the “Active Sprint” section. On the top right corner, you need to click on “Complete Sprint” button.  Step 2: Once the “Complete Sprint” button is clicked, a dialog box appears with details of issues that have been completed and the ones which are pending. Select the place where you wish to move the pending items to, either to the backlog or next sprint which is to be started.Step 3: Once you select the desired value under “Move to” field and click on “Complete” button the Sprint is marked as complete.   
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Scrum adoption is growing very fast and companies are looking for well qualified Scrum Masters. This is one of the main reasons to consider Scrum certification. One simple way to present your excellence is the Scrum Master certification that is perfectly tailored to the industry requirements, and of course, to your career trajectory. Currently, there are 4 primary Scrum Master certifications available. You might be in a confusion regarding the best course to take up for a superior career growth. Question yourself on some of the essentials before actually choosing the course: What does the particular certification mean?What are the prerequisites for this certification?What is the cost of this certification program?What will I achieve by taking this certification?Will this certification offer the biggest benefit for me? In this article, we will help you in choosing the best certification that suits your profile by comparing all the courses based on different aspects. All the 4 certifications are competing equally in the Scrum world. The above certification comparison demonstrates multiple facets of the in-demand Scrum certifications. Experts need to choose the course wisely based on their targets. For example, the target can be whether to:Get benefits in their job change or career orReach greater heights in Scrum role by gaining in-depth knowledgeJust choosing the right course is not enough for a better career growth, but choosing the right training provider will have a great impact on the success of a course. KnowledgeHut as a Global Registered Education Provider (REP) of Scrum Alliance offers the best training from Certified Scrum Master Training approved by Scrum Alliance.All the best for your future Scrum endeavours! Want to get certified? Check out our latest CSM® training course and get the skills required for the future.
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