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How to Become a Successful Full Stack Web Developer?

The ResponsibilitiesFull stack developer roles are among the hottest careers in the tech space now. These talented folks can develop a whole product from scratch. A full stack developer is a combination of Front-end developer and Backend developer. These two in themselves are full time jobs and most people make careers out of one of them. So, we will start with Front-end roadmap and then go to Back-end roadmap. A person interested in becoming a Full-stack developer needs to have proficiency in both the front end and back-end tools, just like I started as a Front-end developer and later on become a Full stack developer by mastering JavaScript backend technologies and databases.Industries where relevantThe demand for Full stack developers is the highest in early-stage startups, where they want to create a Minimum Viable Product at the earliest to showcase to the investors. It is also a nice skill to have in addition to frontend technologies or backend technologies alone, since an employer prefers people with both skills.What to learn & where to learnThere are a lot of technologies to learn to be a Full-Stack developer. We will discuss about them in the coming sections.   List of technologies to master to become a Full-Stack developer A full-stack developer is actually a combination of Frontend developer and Backend developer. We need to master both, and both have different Roadmaps. Let’s start with the basics. The frontend is the web-site which we see and it is primarily made with HTML and CSS.  JavaScript was also used earlier but nowadays, it is created with JavaScript frameworks like ReactJS, Angular or Vue. All these frameworks require one to learn the basics of HTML, CSS, & JavaScript. So, we need to learn the basics followed by at least one framework.In the backend we have a lot of technologies and databases also. So, we need to choose one backend framework from Java (Spring Framework), JavaScript (NodeJS) etc and then also learn databases. Databases are divided into two categories, which is NoSQL(MongoDB) and SQL(PostgreSQL, MySQL, Oracle) databases. So, you need to choose one of the databases.We are also required to know about DevOps, which is a practice of harmonizing development and operations whereby the entire pipeline from development, testing, deployment, continuous integration and feedback is automated. The knowledge of either AWS or Azure based cloud ecosystem is required, and also CI/CD like Jenkins and containerizing & orchestrating applications using Docker and Kubernetes.1. Frontend RoadmapLearn the BasicsPlease refer to the attached figure for Front-end roadmap, as we will be referring to this throughout this article. We have to start our journey by learning HTML, CSS and JavaScript which is the base for a web-app or website. HTML has changed a bit over the years, with the introduction of HTML 5 and semantics tags, so make sure to update yourself. JavaScript which was released in 1995, didn’t change much during the next 20 years. But once more and more developers started using it, the ECMA committee decided to add some very nice features and enhance the language, and renamed it ES6 in 2015. After that they regularly added new features to the language and have just released ES2020 in June 2020, which has many additional features. So, learn the basic JavaScript first and then upgrade to ES6 and newer versions. CSS is what makes a website or web-app beautiful, and is often considered the hardest part by a developer. Earlier, CSS was very confusing and had a steep learning curve, because of the use of floats to create a layout. Developers usually used to work with CSS frameworks like bootstrap to design a site. But things have changed a lot with the invention of CSS Grid and Flexbox. Some of the best resources to learn the basics are - html.specdeveloper.mozilla.HTMLStyle CSSdeveloper.mozilla.CSSdeveloper.mozilla.JavaScriptGetting Deeper Now, just learning JavaScript and some basic CSS will not make you a good Front-end developer as you have to take a deep dive into JavaScript. We will discuss CSS later, after learning the essentials of JavaScript.JavaScript EssentialsThere are many things associated with JavaScript which we need to learn before moving forward.The Terminal The first thing to learn is to work in a terminal, and master some of the basic commands. If you are on a Mac, it’s already based on Linux and runs most Linux commands. If you are working on Windows then you must install git bash, which will give you a Linux environment to work with. In JavaScript frameworks, we need to run a lot of commands from the terminal, like if we want to install a third-party dependency by npm.  The basics of Linux can be learnt from their official site.Version ControlNext, learning version control is very important because we should always keep our code in some remote repository like Github. The industry works on Git, which is version control software. It is completely command-based and is used heavily everywhere. Learn the basic commands which will be useful even for an individual developer. Later on, when working with teams, more advanced knowledge of the git command is required.Through the git commands, we store our code in repositories. The most popular ones are Github and Bit Bucket, so we need to learn how to store and link them.The basics of git can be learnt from this awesome tutorial.freecodecamp.orgTask Runners Task runners are applications which are used to automate tasks required in projects. These tasks include minification of JavaScript and CSS files, CSS preprocessing like from SASS to CSS, image optimization and Unit testing. The three popular task runners are npm scripts, gulp and grunt. The npm script is nothing but the package.json file which comes with React projects or is created in a Node.js project using npm init. Gulp and Grunt are much bigger applications and also have a plugin ecosystem that is suited for large JavaScript projects. The basics for these two technologies can be learnt from here. Module Loader and Bundler Both module loaders and bundlers are required for large JavaScript applications. Knowledge of both is required, if the project you are working is a big Vanilla JavaScript project. When a large JavaScript application consists of hundreds of files, the module loader takes care of the dependency and makes sure all the modules are loaded when the application is executed. Examples are RequireJS and SystemJS.Module bundlers also do the same thing, building it at the time of application build rather than at the runtime. Popular examples are Webpack and Rollup. Testing Testing nowadays is very important in any type of project. There are two types of testing; one is known as Unit testing and other as end-to-end testing. For unit testing we write test cases and the most popular tool nowadays is Jest. End-to-end testing is automated testing, which emulates the whole app. Suppose, an app has a login screen and then it shows posts. The testing tool will run the web-app to check whether all the functionalities are done correctly. The two most popular options today are Puppeteer and Cypress. The tutorials to refer for these topics are - Libraries and FrameworkThey are the most important part of the JavaScript ecosystem nowadays. It all started with the release of AngularJS in 2010. Before that period most enterprise apps were made in Java and were desktop apps. But AngularJS changed everything, because it made it easy to manage big projects with JavaScript and helped to create complex web-apps.1. React It is the most popular JavaScript library today and is used by both enterprises and startups that have a huge ecosystem. It is not a complete framework like Angular and we have to install third party dependencies for most things. But if you want to learn a framework that will get you a job, then that framework would be ReactJS, and its demand is not going away for the next 5 years. The component approach and its easy learning curve have made React more popular than other frameworks. A good starting tutorial for React isState Management In React state management can sometimes become complex, when we need to share data between components. We generally take help of external packages in it with the most popular being Redux. But we also have other state management libraries like XState and Recoil. Server-side rendering With performance becoming important nowadays, Server-Side Rendering speeds up the React projects even faster. In SSR projects, the React code is rendered on the server and the client browser directly receives the HTML, CSS, JS bundle. The only framework to do it is NextJS. Static Site Generators Lot of sites don’t need to be updated frequently and it is the place where the only Static Site Generator for ReactJS, which is GatsbyJS shines. With the help of GatsbyJS we can create extremely fast static sites and it gets into Wordpress domain a lot with it. GatsbyJS also has a huge ecosystem of plugins, which enhances its functionalities. React Testing Unit testing is a very important part of ReactJS projects, especially the ones which are very large. Unit testing ensures that we have lower bugs in Production build. The two popular libraries are – Enzyme and Jest. 2. Angular It is a complete framework and unlike React requires very few external dependencies. Everything is built within Angular and we don’t have to go outside for more features. Since it was among the earliest frameworks, older projects are in Angular and it is still widely used in enterprises. A good tutorial to learn Angular is below. 3. Vue Vue is another very popular JavaScript library, which has the best features of both ReactJS and Angular and has become very popular in recent years. It is widely used in both enterprise and startups. A good tutorial to start with Vue is below. 4. NuxtJS It is used for Server-Side Rendering in Vue projects and is similar to the NextJS framework used in ReactJS for SSR.  5. Svelte It is the newest of all frameworks/libraries and has become quite popular, but still not used much in enterprises and startups. It is different from React, Vue and Angular and converts the app at build time rather than at run time as in the other three. Good tutorials to start with Svelte are below. CSS Deep DiveA lot has changed in CSS after it included CSS Grid and Flexbox; it has become much easier for developers to work with. CSS Essentials It is now mandatory for frontend developers to learn CSS Grid and Flexbox, because through it we can develop beautiful layouts with ease. More companies are moving away from CSS Frameworks and have started working with CSS Grid and Flexbox, which are now supported by all browsers. Good tutorials to learn Flexbox and CSS Grid are below. Preprocessors CSS preprocessors are used to add special functionalities in CSS, which it lacks. An example is Sass, which adds special features like variables and nested rules in CSS and is widely used in the industry for larger projects. The other popular one is PostCSS, in which we can use custom plugin and tools in CSS. CSS Frameworks Frameworks were very popular from the early days of CSS, when it was very complicated because of floats. Bootstrap This is the most popular and oldest CSS framework; easy to learn and also has a wide variety of elements, templates and interfaces. Bulma It is another CSS framework, which is very popular and much easier to use than bootstrap. Tailwind CSS This is a fairly new CSS framework and is quite popular nowadays. It follows a different approach than the other frameworks and contains easier classes. Styled Components (React) This is a CSS in JS library and is for React only. It is used to create components out of every style and is very popular in the React world.  CI/CDThe Continuous Integration/ Continuous deployment is mainly used by DevOps. But a frontend engineer should know its basics. It is used to build, test and deploy applications automatically.Github Actions  It is a freely available CI/CD pipeline, which directly integrates to your github based project and can be used in a variety of languages. Deployment It is again a task which mainly falls into the domain of Backend engineers and DevOps, but a frontend engineer should know some basic and simple tools. Static Deployment These products are mainly used to deploy static sites, which consists of HTML, CSS and JavaScript only. Two very popular services are Amazon S3 and Surge.sh Node Application Deployment The projects containing node code cannot be deployed using static deployment. Even if the project is a simple ReactJS project, it also uses node for processing. These applications require services which run the Node code and deploy it. The three most popular services are Vercel, Firebase and Netlify. 2. Backend RoadmapUnderstanding the BackendBackend is the part of the website that provides the functionality, allowing people to browse their favorite site, purchase a product and log into their account, for instance. All data related to a user or a product or anything else are generally stored in databases or CMS (Content Management System) and when a user visits any website, they are retrieved from there and shown. One of the responsibilities of a backend engineer involves writing APIs, which actually interact with the database and get the data. They are also involved in writing schemas of database and creating the structure of databases. Backend EssentialsFor a backend engineer, working in a Linux environment is an essential skill. A lot of the configurations are done on the terminal. So, he or she should be very good with Linux commands.Also, they should know both commands and the use of any git powered platforms like Github or bitbucket.Languages and FrameworksAll of the popular languages have some framework, which has been used for backend development. These frameworks are generally used to create API endpoints, which are used to fetch or store data in the database. For example, when we scroll articles on Facebook, these articles are fetched from a database and we use the GET method to fetch them. Similarly, when we write an article and hit submit, it uses POST method.Now, different frameworks implement this GET, POST and other APIs also referred to as RESTful APIs in their own way.Java Java is by far the oldest and the most used language for backend development. It is also used for a variety of other tasks like Android development, but it shines in the backend because of its multithreading abilities. So, enterprise grade web-apps and web-apps with a lot of traffic prefer Java, because it handles loads better. The most popular frameworks for backend development in Java are Spring Framework and Hibernate. Some good beginner's tutorials are - JavaScript It is a very popular choice for backend development, because on the frontend side JavaScript is the only choice. So, a lot of frontend engineers can take this choice to become Full-stack developers. Node.js It allows developers to use JavaScript to write server-side code, through which they can write APIs. Actually, the API part can be done by numerous frameworks of Node.js out of which Express is widely used. The other popular framework is Fastify. Some good beginner's tutorials are - Python Python is one of the most popular languages among developers and has been used in a variety of fields. The two most popular frameworks for Python are Flask and Django. Some good beginner tutorials are - C# It is a very popular programming language which was developed by Microsoft and it has the power of C++. Its popularity increased once the .NET framework was released for backend development. As Microsoft is very popular in enterprises, the .NET framework is generally preferred in enterprises. A good tutorial to learn .NET is - Go Go language which is also referred to as Golang, has gained popularity in recent years. It is used a lot in Backend programming and the two popular frameworks are Gin and Beego. DatabaseFor a Backend engineer, after making APIs with framework based on language, it's time to learn about Databases. Databases are used to store most of the things which we see in a web-app, from user login credentials to user posts and everything else. In the earlier days we only used to have one type of Database and that was Relational databases, which use tables to store data. Now we have two other categories also, one being NoSQL databases and the other In-memory databases. 1. Relational databases Relational databases allow you to create, update and delete data stored in a table format. This type of database mostly uses SQL language to access the data, hence is also known as an SQL database. MySQL It is one of the oldest databases and was released in 1995. It is an open-source database and was very popular in the 2000s with the rise of LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) stack. It is still widely in use, but there are other popular Relational databases. A good tutorial to learn MySQL is - PostgreSQL PostgreSQL, which is also known as Postgres is also an old open-source Relational database, which was released in 1996. But it gained popularity recently, as it goes very well with modern stacks containing NodeJS and other backend technologies. A good tutorial to learn PostgreSQL is - Oracle is the most popular and oldest relational database. It was released in 1979 and still remains the number one preference for enterprise customers. All the big banks and other organizations, run on Oracle databases. So, the knowledge of Oracle is a must in many companies for an Engineer. A good tutorial to learn Oracle is - MS-SQL MS-SQL is also known as Microsoft SQL and is yet another commercial Relational database. It has got different editions, used by different audiences. It is also heavily used by enterprise users and powers a whole lot of big systems around the world. A good tutorial to learn MS-SQL is - 2. NoSQL databases NoSQL databases are also called non-SQL databases. The NoSQL databases mainly store data as key-value pairs, but some of them also use a SQL-like structure. These databases have become hugely popular in the 21st century, with the rise of large web-apps which have a lot of concurrent users. These databases can take huge loads, even millions of data connections, required by web-apps like Facebook, Amazon and others. Beside this, it is very easy to horizontally scale  a NoSQL database by adding more clusters, which is a problem in Relational Databases. MongoDB It is the most popular NoSQL database, used by almost every modern app. It is a free to use database, but the hosting is charged if we host on popular cloud services like MongoDB atlas. Its knowledge is a must for backend engineers, who work on the modern stack. MongoDB uses json like documents to store data. A good tutorial to learn MongoDB is - It is a proprietary database service provided by Amazon. It is quite similar to MongoDB and uses key-value pairs to store data. It is also a part of the popular AWS services. A good tutorial to learn DynamoDB is-Cassandra is an open-source and free to use NoSQL database . It takes a different approach when compared to other NoSQL databases, because we use commands like SQL, which are known as CQL (Cassandra Query Language). A good tutorial to learn Cassandra is - 3. In-memory databases The in-memory database is a database, which keeps all of the data in the RAM. This means it is the fastest among all databases.  The most popular and widely used in-memory database is Redis. Redis Redis (Remote Dictionary Server) is an in-memory database, which stores data in RAM in a json like key-value format. It keeps the data persistent by updating everything in the transaction log, because when systems are shut down their RAM is wiped clean. A good tutorial to learn Redis is - StorageStoring the data is an important part of any application. Although this is mainly DevOps territory, every backend developer should know the basics for the same. We need to store the database data and also the backend code. Beside this the frontend code must also be stored somewhere. Nowadays everything is stored in the cloud, which is preferred by individuals, startups and enterprises. The two most popular cloud-based storages are – Amazon S3 Azure Blob Storage Good beginner's tutorials for both areServices and APIsThese are theoretical concepts and are implemented by various services, but a backend engineer should know them and how to use them. Restful APIs This is by far the most popular way to get data from a database. It was made more popular, with the rise of web-apps. We do GET, PUT, POST and DELETE operations to read, update, create or delete data from databases. We have earlier discussed different languages and frameworks, which have their own implementations for these operations. Microservices Architecture In microservice architecture, we divide a large and complex project into small, independent services. Each of these is responsible for a specific task and communicates with other services through simple APIs. Each service is built by a small team from the beginning, and separated by boundaries which make it easier to scale up the development effort if needed. GraphQL It is the hottest new kid in the block, which is an alternative to the Restful APIs. The problem with Restful APIs is that if you want some data stored in database, you need to get the whole data sent by the endpoint. On the other hand, with GraphQL, you get a query type language which can return only the part of the data which you require.  DevOps & DeploymentA backend engineer requires a fair bit of DevOps knowledge. So, we will next deep dive into the methodologies in DevOps. 1. Containerization & Orchestration Containers are a method of building, packaging and deploying software. They are similar to but not the same thing as virtual machines (VMs). One of the primary differences is that containers are isolated or abstracted away from the underlying operating system and infrastructure that they run on. In the simplest terms, a container includes both an application’s code and everything that code needs to run properly. Container orchestration is the automatic process of managing the work of individual containers for applications based on microservice architecture. The popular Containerization and Orchestration tools are – Kubernetes Docker Good beginner's tutorials for both are -2. DevOps DevOps is a set of practices that combine software development (Dev) and IT operations (Ops). It aims to shorten the systems development life cycle and provide continuous delivery with high software quality. The two most popular DevOps services are AWS and Azure. Both of them are cloud based and are market leaders. Both of these platforms contain a wide variety of similar services. AWS It consists of over 200 products and services for storage, database, analytics, deployment, serverless function and many more. AWS is the market leader as of now with 33% of market share. The AWS certifications are also one of the most in-demand certifications and a must for frontend engineers as well as Backend engineers. Azure Microsoft Azure is second in terms of market share of cloud-based platforms, with 18% of the market. It also consists of SaaS (Software as a Service), PaaS (Platform as a Service) and IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) like AWS. 3. PaaS (Platform as a Service) There are several smaller players, which provide Platform as a Service and are much easier to use than services like AWS and Azure. With these services you can directly deploy your React or other web-apps, by just hosting them on GitHub and pushing the code. These services are preferred a lot by freelancers, hobbyists and small companies as they don’t require investment in learning complicated services like AWS and Azure. The three most popular PaaS services are Digital Ocean Heroku Netlify 4. Serverless Serverless computing is an execution model where the cloud provider (AWS, Azure, or Google Cloud) is responsible for executing a piece of code by dynamically allocating resources and only charging for the number of resources used to run the code. The code is typically run inside stateless containers that can be triggered by a variety of events including http requests, database events, queuing services, monitoring alerts, file uploads, scheduled events (cron jobs), etc. The code that is sent to the cloud provider for execution is usually in the form of a function. AWS Lambda It is an event-driven, serverless platform which is part of AWS. The various languages supported by AWS Lambda are Node.js, Python, Java, Go, Ruby and .NET. AWS Lambda was designed for use cases such as updates to DynamoDB tables, responding to a website click etc. After that it will “spin down” the database service, to save resources. Azure Functions They are quite similar to AWS Lambda, but are for Microsoft Azure. Azure functions have a browser-based interface to write code to respond to events generated by http requests etc. The service accepts programming languages like C#, F#, Node.js, Python, PHP and Java. Serverless Framework It is an open-source web-framework written using Node.js. The popular services like AWS Lambda, Azure functions and Google cloud functions are based on it. CI/CD A backend developer should know the popular CI/CD (Continuous Integration/Continuous deployment) tools. These tools help to automate the whole process of building, testing and deployment of applications. Github Actions  It is a freely available CI/CD pipeline, which directly integrates to your GitHub based project and can be used in variety of languages. Jenkins Jenkins is the most popular CI/CD automation tool, which helps in building, testing and deployment of applications. Jenkins was written in Java and over the years has been built to support over 1400 plugins, which extend its functionalities. Circle CI Circle CI is also a CI/CD automation tool, which is cloud based and so it is different from Jenkins. It is much easier to use than Jenkins, but has a smaller community and lower user base. SecuritySecurity is an important aspect of any application. Most applications containing user personal data, like email etc, are often targeted by hackers. OWASP The Open Web Application Security Project (or OWASP), is a non-profit organization dedicated to web application security. They have free material available on their website, making it possible for anyone to improve their web application security. Protecting Services & databases against threats Hackers target databases of popular web-apps on a regular basis to get sensitive information about their customers. This data is then sold to the highest bidder on the dark-net. When such public breaches are reported, then it's a reputation loss for the enterprise also. So, a lot of emphasis should be given to Authentication, Access, Backups, and Encryption while setting up a database. The databases should also be monitored for any suspicious activities. Besides this the API routes also need to be protected, so that the hacker cannot manipulate them. Career roles Most of the companies hire Frontend developers, Backend developers and DevOps engineers separately. This is because most of the enterprise projects are huge, in which roles and responsibilities are distributed. But there is a huge demand for Full Stack developers in the startup sector in US and India. These companies need specialists who can get the product out as soon as possible with agile and small teams. Top companies hiringAlmost every company on the planet is hiring web-developers or outsourcing the development work. Since the past decade, the demand for developers has risen exponentially. The top technology companies which hire full stack developers are Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix, Google, Uber, Flipkart, Microsoft and more.  The sites of each of these companies are web-apps (excluding Apple and Microsoft), with complex frontend and backend systems. The frontend generally consists of React or Angular and the backend is a combination of various technologies. The DevOps part is also quite important in these web-apps as they handle millions of concurrent connections at once.Salaries  The salary of a beginner Frontend developer in India starts from Rs. 300,000($ 3980) per year in service-based companies to Rs. 12,00,000($ 15,971) per year in the top tech companies mentioned above. The salary of a Beginner Full-Stack developer in India starts at Rs. 4,50,000 ($ 5989) per year in service companies to Rs. 12,00,000($ 15,971) per year in top tech companies. The salary for an entry level Frontend developer in USA is $ 59,213 per year and for an entry level Full stack developer is $ 61,042 per year.Below are some sources for salaries. Top regions where there is demand There are plenty of remote and freelancing opportunities in web-development across the world. The two countries with most developers and top tech companies are USA and India. Silicon Valley, which is the San Francisco Bay Area, in Northern California, USA is the hub of technology companies.  The top city in India to start a developer job is the Silicon Valley of India – Bengaluru. The number of jobs is more than all the other cities combined and it also has a very good startup ecosystem. Almost all the big technology companies mentioned earlier and top Indian service companies are located in the city. After Bengaluru, the city where the greatest number of technology jobs are based is Hyderabad, followed by Chennai and then Pune. Entry PointsThe demand for web-developers is high and anyone with a passion for creating apps can become a web-developer. An Engineering degree is not mandatory to land a job as a web developer.  The most in-demand skill today and for the next 5 years is React and its ecosystem. So, if you know HTML, CSS, JavaScript and React, it is impossible to not get a job. Career Pathway  Most people start as an intern Front-end developer or Intern Full-Stack developer and in many cases Intern Backend developer. Many companies directly hire junior Frontend/Backend/Full-stack developers.  After that, the next step is the role of Senior Frontend/Backend/Full-stack developers. Many Frontend and Backend developers become full stack developers at this level, by learning additional technologies. Senior resources in Frontend/Backend/Full-stack can then go on to assume Team Lead roles. These people manage small teams in addition to being individual contributors.  After this a professional can become a Project manager, whose main responsibility is managing the team. Another role is that of Technical Project Manager, who manages the team and also has hands-on knowledge in Technology. The last role at this level is that of a Software Architect, who handles and designs big projects and has to look at every aspect of the technology to create the enterprise app. Generally Full-stack developers are preferred in this role, as they need to know all technologies. The highest career milestone is CTO or Chief Technology Officer, who handles all the technology teams and makes all technology decisions in a Technology company. Job SpecializationThere are some Full stack development specializations which I see nowadays in the industry. Full stack developers who work with React in the Frontend and Java in the Backend are in great demand. Similarly, developers who work with Angular in the Frontend and .NET in the backend are in great demand.How KnowledgeHut can helpjourney. Beside these there are many other free resources on the internet, but they are not organized and don’t have a structured approach.   This is where KnowledgeHut shines and serves as a one stop shop alternative with its comprehensive Instructor-led live classes. The courses are taken by Industry experts and are perfect for aspirants who wish to become Frontend or FullStack developers.  Links for some of the popular courses by KnowledgeHut are appended below-CSS3JavaScriptReactJSNodeJSDevopsConclusion This completes our article on the Full stack developer journey by combining both the Frontend and backend roadmap. There are many people who become backend developers first by working on languages like Java and then go on to learn React to become full stack developers.  Again, many developers learn front-end development first with frameworks like React, and then become full stack developers by learning Node.JS. This path is easier for developers because both React and Node.JS use the same language which is JavaScript.  We hope you have found this blog useful, and can now take the right path to become a full stack developer. Good luck on your learning journey!

How to Become a Successful Full Stack Web Developer?

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How to Become a Successful Full Stack Web Developer?

The Responsibilities

Full stack developer roles are among the hottest careers in the tech space now. These talented folks can develop a whole product from scratch. 

A full stack developer is a combination of Front-end developer and Backend developer. These two in themselves are full time jobs and most people make careers out of one of them. So, we will start with Front-end roadmap and then go to Back-end roadmap. 

A person interested in becoming a Full-stack developer needs to have proficiency in both the front end and back-end tools, just like I started as a Front-end developer and later on become a Full stack developer by mastering JavaScript backend technologies and databases.

Industries where relevant

The demand for Full stack developers is the highest in early-stage startups, where they want to create a Minimum Viable Product at the earliest to showcase to the investors. It is also a nice skill to have in addition to frontend technologies or backend technologies alone, since an employer prefers people with both skills.

What to learn & where to learn

There are a lot of technologies to learn to be a Full-Stack developer. We will discuss about them in the coming sections.  

List of technologies to master to become a Full-Stack developer 

A full-stack developer is actually a combination of Frontend developer and Backend developer. We need to master both, and both have different Roadmaps. Let’s start with the basics. 

The frontend is the web-site which we see and it is primarily made with HTML and CSS.  JavaScript was also used earlier but nowadays, it is created with JavaScript frameworks like ReactJS, Angular or Vue. All these frameworks require one to learn the basics of HTML, CSS, & JavaScript. So, we need to learn the basics followed by at least one framework.

In the backend we have a lot of technologies and databases also. So, we need to choose one backend framework from Java (Spring Framework), JavaScript (NodeJS) etc and then also learn databases. Databases are divided into two categories, which is NoSQL(MongoDB) and SQL(PostgreSQL, MySQL, Oracle) databases. So, you need to choose one of the databases.

We are also required to know about DevOps, which is a practice of harmonizing development and operations whereby the entire pipeline from development, testing, deployment, continuous integration and feedback is automated. The knowledge of either AWS or Azure based cloud ecosystem is required, and also CI/CD like Jenkins and containerizing & orchestrating applications using Docker and Kubernetes.

1. Frontend Roadmap

Frontend Road

Learn the Basics

Please refer to the attached figure for Front-end roadmap, as we will be referring to this throughout this article. We have to start our journey by learning HTML, CSS and JavaScript which is the base for a web-app or website. HTML has changed a bit over the years, with the introduction of HTML 5 and semantics tags, so make sure to update yourself. 

JavaScript which was released in 1995, didn’t change much during the next 20 years. But once more and more developers started using it, the ECMA committee decided to add some very nice features and enhance the language, and renamed it ES6 in 2015. After that they regularly added new features to the language and have just released ES2020 in June 2020, which has many additional features. So, learn the basic JavaScript first and then upgrade to ES6 and newer versions. 

CSS is what makes a website or web-app beautiful, and is often considered the hardest part by a developer. Earlier, CSS was very confusing and had a steep learning curve, because of the use of floats to create a layout. Developers usually used to work with CSS frameworks like bootstrap to design a site. But things have changed a lot with the invention of CSS Grid and Flexbox. 

Some of the best resources to learn the basics are - 

  1. html.spec
  2. developer.mozilla.HTML
  3. Style CSS
  4. developer.mozilla.CSS
  5. developer.mozilla.JavaScript

Getting Deeper 

Now, just learning JavaScript and some basic CSS will not make you a good Front-end developer as you have to take a deep dive into JavaScript. We will discuss CSS later, after learning the essentials of JavaScript.

JavaScript Essentials

There are many things associated with JavaScript which we need to learn before moving forward.

  • The Terminal 

The first thing to learn is to work in a terminal, and master some of the basic commands. If you are on a Mac, it’s already based on Linux and runs most Linux commands. If you are working on Windows then you must install git bash, which will give you a Linux environment to work with. In JavaScript frameworks, we need to run a lot of commands from the terminal, like if we want to install a third-party dependency by npm.  

The basics of Linux can be learnt from their official site.

  • Version Control

Next, learning version control is very important because we should always keep our code in some remote repository like Github. The industry works on Git, which is version control software. It is completely command-based and is used heavily everywhere. Learn the basic commands which will be useful even for an individual developer. Later on, when working with teams, more advanced knowledge of the git command is required.

Through the git commands, we store our code in repositories. The most popular ones are Github and Bit Bucket, so we need to learn how to store and link them.

The basics of git can be learnt from this awesome tutorial.

freecodecamp.org

  • Task Runners 

Task runners are applications which are used to automate tasks required in projects. These tasks include minification of JavaScript and CSS files, CSS preprocessing like from SASS to CSS, image optimization and Unit testing. The three popular task runners are npm scriptsgulp and grunt. 

The npm script is nothing but the package.json file which comes with React projects or is created in a Node.js project using npm init. 

Gulp and Grunt are much bigger applications and also have a plugin ecosystem that is suited for large JavaScript projects. The basics for these two technologies can be learnt from here. 

  • Module Loader and Bundler 

Both module loaders and bundlers are required for large JavaScript applications. Knowledge of both is required, if the project you are working is a big Vanilla JavaScript project. 

When a large JavaScript application consists of hundreds of files, the module loader takes care of the dependency and makes sure all the modules are loaded when the application is executed. Examples are RequireJS and SystemJS.

Module bundlers also do the same thing, building it at the time of application build rather than at the runtime. Popular examples are Webpack and Rollup

  • Testing 

Testing nowadays is very important in any type of project. There are two types of testing; one is known as Unit testing and other as end-to-end testing. For unit testing we write test cases and the most popular tool nowadays is Jest. 

End-to-end testing is automated testing, which emulates the whole app. Suppose, an app has a login screen and then it shows posts. The testing tool will run the web-app to check whether all the functionalities are done correctly. The two most popular options today are Puppeteer and Cypress. The tutorials to refer for these topics are - 

Libraries and Framework

They are the most important part of the JavaScript ecosystem nowadays. It all started with the release of AngularJS in 2010. Before that period most enterprise apps were made in Java and were desktop apps. But AngularJS changed everything, because it made it easy to manage big projects with JavaScript and helped to create complex web-apps.

1. React 

It is the most popular JavaScript library today and is used by both enterprises and startups that have a huge ecosystem. It is not a complete framework like Angular and we have to install third party dependencies for most things. But if you want to learn a framework that will get you a job, then that framework would be ReactJS, and its demand is not going away for the next 5 years. The component approach and its easy learning curve have made React more popular than other frameworks. A good starting tutorial for React is

  • State Management 

In React state management can sometimes become complex, when we need to share data between components. We generally take help of external packages in it with the most popular being Redux. But we also have other state management libraries like XState and Recoil. 

  • Server-side rendering 

With performance becoming important nowadays, Server-Side Rendering speeds up the React projects even faster. In SSR projects, the React code is rendered on the server and the client browser directly receives the HTML, CSS, JS bundle. The only framework to do it is NextJS. 

  • Static Site Generators 

Lot of sites don’t need to be updated frequently and it is the place where the only Static Site Generator for ReactJS, which is GatsbyJS shines. With the help of GatsbyJS we can create extremely fast static sites and it gets into Wordpress domain a lot with it. GatsbyJS also has a huge ecosystem of plugins, which enhances its functionalities. 

  • React Testing 

Unit testing is a very important part of ReactJS projects, especially the ones which are very large. Unit testing ensures that we have lower bugs in Production build. The two popular libraries are – Enzyme and Jest. 

2. Angular 

It is a complete framework and unlike React requires very few external dependencies. Everything is built within Angular and we don’t have to go outside for more features. Since it was among the earliest frameworks, older projects are in Angular and it is still widely used in enterprises. A good tutorial to learn Angular is below. 

3. Vue 

Vue is another very popular JavaScript library, which has the best features of both ReactJS and Angular and has become very popular in recent years. It is widely used in both enterprise and startups. A good tutorial to start with Vue is below. 

4. NuxtJS 

It is used for Server-Side Rendering in Vue projects and is similar to the NextJS framework used in ReactJS for SSR.  

5. Svelte 

It is the newest of all frameworks/libraries and has become quite popular, but still not used much in enterprises and startups. It is different from React, Vue and Angular and converts the app at build time rather than at run time as in the other three. Good tutorials to start with Svelte are below. 

CSS Deep Dive

A lot has changed in CSS after it included CSS Grid and Flexbox; it has become much easier for developers to work with. 

CSS Essentials 

It is now mandatory for frontend developers to learn CSS Grid and Flexbox, because through it we can develop beautiful layouts with ease. More companies are moving away from CSS Frameworks and have started working with CSS Grid and Flexbox, which are now supported by all browsers. Good tutorials to learn Flexbox and CSS Grid are below. 

Preprocessors 

CSS preprocessors are used to add special functionalities in CSS, which it lacks. An example is Sass, which adds special features like variables and nested rules in CSS and is widely used in the industry for larger projects. 

The other popular one is PostCSS, in which we can use custom plugin and tools in CSS. 

CSS Frameworks 

Frameworks were very popular from the early days of CSS, when it was very complicated because of floats. 

  • Bootstrap 

This is the most popular and oldest CSS framework; easy to learn and also has a wide variety of elements, templates and interfaces. 

  • Bulma 

It is another CSS framework, which is very popular and much easier to use than bootstrap. 

  • Tailwind CSS 

This is a fairly new CSS framework and is quite popular nowadays. It follows a different approach than the other frameworks and contains easier classes. 

  • Styled Components (React) 

This is a CSS in JS library and is for React only. It is used to create components out of every style and is very popular in the React world.  

CI/CD

The Continuous Integration/ Continuous deployment is mainly used by DevOps. But a frontend engineer should know its basics. It is used to build, test and deploy applications automatically.

  • Github Actions  

It is a freely available CI/CD pipeline, which directly integrates to your github based project and can be used in a variety of languages. 

Deployment 

It is again a task which mainly falls into the domain of Backend engineers and DevOps, but a frontend engineer should know some basic and simple tools. 

  • Static Deployment 

These products are mainly used to deploy static sites, which consists of HTML, CSS and JavaScript only. Two very popular services are Amazon S3 and Surge.sh 

  • Node Application Deployment 

The projects containing node code cannot be deployed using static deployment. Even if the project is a simple ReactJS project, it also uses node for processing. These applications require services which run the Node code and deploy it. The three most popular services are VercelFirebase and Netlify. 

2. Backend Roadmap

Backend Roadmap

Understanding the Backend

Backend is the part of the website that provides the functionality, allowing people to browse their favorite site, purchase a product and log into their account, for instance. All data related to a user or a product or anything else are generally stored in databases or CMS (Content Management System) and when a user visits any website, they are retrieved from there and shown. 

One of the responsibilities of a backend engineer involves writing APIs, which actually interact with the database and get the data. They are also involved in writing schemas of database and creating the structure of databases. 

Backend Essentials

For a backend engineer, working in a Linux environment is an essential skill. A lot of the configurations are done on the terminal. So, he or she should be very good with Linux commands.

Also, they should know both commands and the use of any git powered platforms like Github or bitbucket.

Languages and Frameworks

All of the popular languages have some framework, which has been used for backend development. These frameworks are generally used to create API endpoints, which are used to fetch or store data in the database. For example, when we scroll articles on Facebook, these articles are fetched from a database and we use the GET method to fetch them. Similarly, when we write an article and hit submit, it uses POST method.

Now, different frameworks implement this GET, POST and other APIs also referred to as RESTful APIs in their own way.

  • Java 

Java is by far the oldest and the most used language for backend development. It is also used for a variety of other tasks like Android development, but it shines in the backend because of its multithreading abilities. So, enterprise grade web-apps and web-apps with a lot of traffic prefer Java, because it handles loads better. 

The most popular frameworks for backend development in Java are Spring Framework and Hibernate. Some good beginner's tutorials are - 

  • JavaScript 

It is a very popular choice for backend development, because on the frontend side JavaScript is the only choice. So, a lot of frontend engineers can take this choice to become Full-stack developers. 

  • Node.js 

It allows developers to use JavaScript to write server-side code, through which they can write APIs. Actually, the API part can be done by numerous frameworks of Node.js out of which Express is widely used. The other popular framework is Fastify. Some good beginner's tutorials are - 

  • Python 

Python is one of the most popular languages among developers and has been used in a variety of fields. The two most popular frameworks for Python are Flask and Django. Some good beginner tutorials are - 

  • C# 

It is a very popular programming language which was developed by Microsoft and it has the power of C++. Its popularity increased once the .NET framework was released for backend development. 

As Microsoft is very popular in enterprises, the .NET framework is generally preferred in enterprises. A good tutorial to learn .NET is - 

  • Go 

Go language which is also referred to as Golang, has gained popularity in recent years. It is used a lot in Backend programming and the two popular frameworks are Gin and Beego. 

Database

For a Backend engineer, after making APIs with framework based on language, it's time to learn about Databases. Databases are used to store most of the things which we see in a web-app, from user login credentials to user posts and everything else. In the earlier days we only used to have one type of Database and that was Relational databases, which use tables to store data. Now we have two other categories also, one being NoSQL databases and the other In-memory databases. 

1. Relational databases 

Relational databases allow you to create, update and delete data stored in a table format. This type of database mostly uses SQL language to access the data, hence is also known as an SQL database. 

  • MySQL 

It is one of the oldest databases and was released in 1995. It is an open-source database and was very popular in the 2000s with the rise of LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) stack. It is still widely in use, but there are other popular Relational databases. A good tutorial to learn MySQL is - 

  • PostgreSQL 

PostgreSQL, which is also known as Postgres is also an old open-source Relational database, which was released in 1996. But it gained popularity recently, as it goes very well with modern stacks containing NodeJS and other backend technologies. A good tutorial to learn PostgreSQL is - 

Oracle is the most popular and oldest relational database. It was released in 1979 and still remains the number one preference for enterprise customers. All the big banks and other organizations, run on Oracle databases. So, the knowledge of Oracle is a must in many companies for an Engineer. A good tutorial to learn Oracle is - 

  • MS-SQL 

MS-SQL is also known as Microsoft SQL and is yet another commercial Relational database. It has got different editions, used by different audiences. It is also heavily used by enterprise users and powers a whole lot of big systems around the world. A good tutorial to learn MS-SQL is - 

2. NoSQL databases 

NoSQL databases are also called non-SQL databases. The NoSQL databases mainly store data as key-value pairs, but some of them also use a SQL-like structure. 

These databases have become hugely popular in the 21st century, with the rise of large web-apps which have a lot of concurrent users. These databases can take huge loads, even millions of data connections, required by web-apps like Facebook, Amazon and others. Beside this, it is very easy to horizontally scale  a NoSQL database by adding more clusters, which is a problem in Relational Databases. 

  • MongoDB 

It is the most popular NoSQL database, used by almost every modern app. It is a free to use database, but the hosting is charged if we host on popular cloud services like MongoDB atlas. Its knowledge is a must for backend engineers, who work on the modern stack. MongoDB uses json like documents to store data. A good tutorial to learn MongoDB is - 

It is a proprietary database service provided by Amazon. It is quite similar to MongoDB and uses key-value pairs to store data. It is also a part of the popular AWS services. A good tutorial to learn DynamoDB is-

Cassandra is an open-source and free to use NoSQL database . It takes a different approach when compared to other NoSQL databases, because we use commands like SQL, which are known as CQL (Cassandra Query Language). A good tutorial to learn Cassandra is - 

3. In-memory databases 

The in-memory database is a database, which keeps all of the data in the RAM. This means it is the fastest among all databases.  The most popular and widely used in-memory database is Redis. 

  • Redis 

Redis (Remote Dictionary Server) is an in-memory database, which stores data in RAM in a json like key-value format. It keeps the data persistent by updating everything in the transaction log, because when systems are shut down their RAM is wiped clean. A good tutorial to learn Redis is - 

Storage

Storing the data is an important part of any application. Although this is mainly DevOps territory, every backend developer should know the basics for the same. We need to store the database data and also the backend code. Beside this the frontend code must also be stored somewhere. Nowadays everything is stored in the cloud, which is preferred by individuals, startups and enterprises. The two most popular cloud-based storages are – 

Good beginner's tutorials for both are

Services and APIs

These are theoretical concepts and are implemented by various services, but a backend engineer should know them and how to use them. 

  • Restful APIs 

This is by far the most popular way to get data from a database. It was made more popular, with the rise of web-apps. We do GET, PUT, POST and DELETE operations to read, update, create or delete data from databases. We have earlier discussed different languages and frameworks, which have their own implementations for these operations. 

  • Microservices Architecture 

In microservice architecture, we divide a large and complex project into small, independent services. Each of these is responsible for a specific task and communicates with other services through simple APIs. Each service is built by a small team from the beginning, and separated by boundaries which make it easier to scale up the development effort if needed. 

  • GraphQL 

It is the hottest new kid in the block, which is an alternative to the Restful APIs. The problem with Restful APIs is that if you want some data stored in database, you need to get the whole data sent by the endpoint. On the other hand, with GraphQL, you get a query type language which can return only the part of the data which you require.  

DevOps & Deployment

A backend engineer requires a fair bit of DevOps knowledge. So, we will next deep dive into the methodologies in DevOps. 

1. Containerization & Orchestration 

Containers are a method of building, packaging and deploying software. They are similar to but not the same thing as virtual machines (VMs). One of the primary differences is that containers are isolated or abstracted away from the underlying operating system and infrastructure that they run on. In the simplest terms, a container includes both an application’s code and everything that code needs to run properly. 

Container orchestration is the automatic process of managing the work of individual containers for applications based on microservice architecture. The popular Containerization and Orchestration tools are – 

Good beginner's tutorials for both are -

2. DevOps 

DevOps is a set of practices that combine software development (Dev) and IT operations (Ops). It aims to shorten the systems development life cycle and provide continuous delivery with high software quality. The two most popular DevOps services are AWS and Azure. Both of them are cloud based and are market leaders. Both of these platforms contain a wide variety of similar services. 

  • AWS 

It consists of over 200 products and services for storage, database, analytics, deployment, serverless function and many more. AWS is the market leader as of now with 33% of market share. The AWS certifications are also one of the most in-demand certifications and a must for frontend engineers as well as Backend engineers. 

  • Azure 

Microsoft Azure is second in terms of market share of cloud-based platforms, with 18% of the market. It also consists of SaaS (Software as a Service), PaaS (Platform as a Service) and IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) like AWS. 

3. PaaS (Platform as a Service) 

There are several smaller players, which provide Platform as a Service and are much easier to use than services like AWS and Azure. With these services you can directly deploy your React or other web-apps, by just hosting them on GitHub and pushing the code. These services are preferred a lot by freelancers, hobbyists and small companies as they don’t require investment in learning complicated services like AWS and Azure. The three most popular PaaS services are 

  • Digital Ocean 
  • Heroku 
  • Netlify 

4. Serverless 

Serverless computing is an execution model where the cloud provider (AWS, Azure, or Google Cloud) is responsible for executing a piece of code by dynamically allocating resources and only charging for the number of resources used to run the code. The code is typically run inside stateless containers that can be triggered by a variety of events including http requests, database events, queuing services, monitoring alerts, file uploads, scheduled events (cron jobs), etc. The code that is sent to the cloud provider for execution is usually in the form of a function. 

  • AWS Lambda 

It is an event-driven, serverless platform which is part of AWS. The various languages supported by AWS Lambda are Node.js, Python, Java, Go, Ruby and .NET. AWS Lambda was designed for use cases such as updates to DynamoDB tables, responding to a website click etc. After that it will “spin down” the database service, to save resources. 

  • Azure Functions 

They are quite similar to AWS Lambda, but are for Microsoft Azure. Azure functions have a browser-based interface to write code to respond to events generated by http requests etc. The service accepts programming languages like C#, F#, Node.js, Python, PHP and Java. 

  • Serverless Framework 

It is an open-source web-framework written using Node.js. The popular services like AWS Lambda, Azure functions and Google cloud functions are based on it. 

CI/CD 

A backend developer should know the popular CI/CD (Continuous Integration/Continuous deployment) tools. These tools help to automate the whole process of building, testing and deployment of applications. 

  • Github Actions 

 It is a freely available CI/CD pipeline, which directly integrates to your GitHub based project and can be used in variety of languages. 

  • Jenkins 

Jenkins is the most popular CI/CD automation tool, which helps in building, testing and deployment of applications. Jenkins was written in Java and over the years has been built to support over 1400 plugins, which extend its functionalities. 

  • Circle CI 

Circle CI is also a CI/CD automation tool, which is cloud based and so it is different from Jenkins. It is much easier to use than Jenkins, but has a smaller community and lower user base. 

Security

Security is an important aspect of any application. Most applications containing user personal data, like email etc, are often targeted by hackers. 

  • OWASP 

The Open Web Application Security Project (or OWASP), is a non-profit organization dedicated to web application security. They have free material available on their website, making it possible for anyone to improve their web application security. 

  • Protecting Services & databases against threats 

Hackers target databases of popular web-apps on a regular basis to get sensitive information about their customers. This data is then sold to the highest bidder on the dark-net. When such public breaches are reported, then it's a reputation loss for the enterprise also. So, a lot of emphasis should be given to Authentication, Access, Backups, and Encryption while setting up a database. The databases should also be monitored for any suspicious activities. 

Besides this the API routes also need to be protected, so that the hacker cannot manipulate them. 

Career roles 

Most of the companies hire Frontend developers, Backend developers and DevOps engineers separately. This is because most of the enterprise projects are huge, in which roles and responsibilities are distributed. 

But there is a huge demand for Full Stack developers in the startup sector in US and India. These companies need specialists who can get the product out as soon as possible with agile and small teams. 

Top companies hiring

Almost every company on the planet is hiring web-developers or outsourcing the development work. Since the past decade, the demand for developers has risen exponentially. The top technology companies which hire full stack developers are Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix, Google, Uber, Flipkart, Microsoft and more.  

The sites of each of these companies are web-apps (excluding Apple and Microsoft), with complex frontend and backend systems. The frontend generally consists of React or Angular and the backend is a combination of various technologies. The DevOps part is also quite important in these web-apps as they handle millions of concurrent connections at once.

Salaries  

The salary of a beginner Frontend developer in India starts from Rs. 300,000($ 3980) per year in service-based companies to Rs. 12,00,000($ 15,971) per year in the top tech companies mentioned above. The salary of a Beginner Full-Stack developer in India starts at Rs. 4,50,000 ($ 5989) per year in service companies to Rs. 12,00,000($ 15,971) per year in top tech companies. 

The salary for an entry level Frontend developer in USA is $ 59,213 per year and for an entry level Full stack developer is $ 61,042 per year.

Below are some sources for salaries. 

Top regions where there is demand 

There are plenty of remote and freelancing opportunities in web-development across the world. The two countries with most developers and top tech companies are USA and India. Silicon Valley, which is the San Francisco Bay Area, in Northern California, USA is the hub of technology companies.  
The top city in India to start a developer job is the Silicon Valley of India – Bengaluru. The number of jobs is more than all the other cities combined and it also has a very good startup ecosystem. Almost all the big technology companies mentioned earlier and top Indian service companies are located in the city. After Bengaluru, the city where the greatest number of technology jobs are based is Hyderabad, followed by Chennai and then Pune. 

Entry Points

The demand for web-developers is high and anyone with a passion for creating apps can become a web-developer. An Engineering degree is not mandatory to land a job as a web developer.  The most in-demand skill today and for the next 5 years is React and its ecosystem. So, if you know HTML, CSS, JavaScript and React, it is impossible to not get a job. 

Career Pathway  

Most people start as an intern Front-end developer or Intern Full-Stack developer and in many cases Intern Backend developer. Many companies directly hire junior Frontend/Backend/Full-stack developers.  

After that, the next step is the role of Senior Frontend/Backend/Full-stack developers. Many Frontend and Backend developers become full stack developers at this level, by learning additional technologies. Senior resources in Frontend/Backend/Full-stack can then go on to assume Team Lead roles. These people manage small teams in addition to being individual contributors.  

After this a professional can become a Project manager, whose main responsibility is managing the team. Another role is that of Technical Project Manager, who manages the team and also has hands-on knowledge in Technology. The last role at this level is that of a Software Architect, who handles and designs big projects and has to look at every aspect of the technology to create the enterprise app. Generally Full-stack developers are preferred in this role, as they need to know all technologies. 

The highest career milestone is CTO or Chief Technology Officer, who handles all the technology teams and makes all technology decisions in a Technology company. 

Job Specialization

There are some Full stack development specializations which I see nowadays in the industry. Full stack developers who work with React in the Frontend and Java in the Backend are in great demand. Similarly, developers who work with Angular in the Frontend and .NET in the backend are in great demand.

How KnowledgeHut can help

journey. Beside these there are many other free resources on the internet, but they are not organized and don’t have a structured approach.   

This is where KnowledgeHut shines and serves as a one stop shop alternative with its comprehensive Instructor-led live classes. The courses are taken by Industry experts and are perfect for aspirants who wish to become Frontend or FullStack developers.  

Links for some of the popular courses by KnowledgeHut are appended below-

Conclusion 

This completes our article on the Full stack developer journey by combining both the Frontend and backend roadmap. There are many people who become backend developers first by working on languages like Java and then go on to learn React to become full stack developers.  

Again, many developers learn front-end development first with frameworks like React, and then become full stack developers by learning Node.JS. This path is easier for developers because both React and Node.JS use the same language which is JavaScript.  

We hope you have found this blog useful, and can now take the right path to become a full stack developer. Good luck on your learning journey!

KnowledgeHut

KnowledgeHut

Author

KnowledgeHut is an outcome-focused global ed-tech company. We help organizations and professionals unlock excellence through skills development. We offer training solutions under the people and process, data science, full-stack development, cybersecurity, future technologies and digital transformation verticals.
Website : https://www.knowledgehut.com

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Please make sure you have downloaded the MongoDB Community Server and installed in it. It is a very easy setup and you will find lot of good articles on the internet detailing this out. Please ensure that you have added it in the Environment variable in your PC. Backup Considerations In a production environment, backups act as a snapshot of the database at a certain point. Large and complex databases do fail or can be hacked. If that happens, we can use the last backup file to restore the database to the point, before it failed. These are some of the factors which should be taken into consideration when doing a recovery.  1. Recovery Point Objective We should know the objective of the recovery point, which means how much data we are willing to lose during a backup and restoration. A continuous backup is preferred for critical data like bank information and backups should be taken several times during the day. On the other hand, if the data doesn’t change frequently, then the backup can be taken every 6 months.  2. Recovery Time ObjectiveThis tells how quickly the restoration can be done. During restoration the application will be down for some time; and this downtime should be minimized, or else customer relationships will be lost.  3. Database and Snapshot IsolationThis refers to the distance between the primary database server and the backup server. If they are close enough i.e., in the same building, then the recovery time reduces. However, in the event of a physical event such as a fire, there is a likelihood of it been destroyed with the primary database.   4. Restoration Process We should always test our backups in test servers to see if they will work, in case a restoration is required.  5. Available Storage Backup of database generally takes a lot of space and in most cases, it will never be required. So, we should try to minimize the space taken on the disk, by archiving the database into a zip file.  6. Complexity of DeploymentThe backup strategy should be easy to set and should be automated, so that we don’t have to remember to take the backup after regular intervals. Understanding the Basics The first thing that we should know is that MongoDB uses json and bson(binary json) formats for storing data. So, people coming from a JavaScript background can relate to objects for json, which have a key-value pair. Also, json is the preferred format in which we receive or send data to an API endpoint. You can check the json data of a MongoDB database in any tool or online editors. Even the famous Windows application Notepad++ has a json viewer. An example of a json document looks like below. As we can see from the above example, json is very convenient to work with, especially for developers.  But it doesn’t support all the data types available in bson. So, for backup and restoring, we should use binary bson. The second thing to keep in mind is that MongoDB automatically creates databases and collection names if they don’t exist during restore operations. Third, since MongoDB is a document-based database, in many user cases we store large amounts of data in one collection, such as the whole post of an article. MongoDB is also used extensively in large databases and big data. So, reading and inserting the data can consume a lot of CPU, memory and disk space. We should always run the backups during the non-peak hours like night. As already mentioned earlier, we can use import and export functions for backup and restoration of MongoDB databases, but we should use commands like mongodump and mongorestore to backup and restore respectively. MongoDB backup We will first cover backing up the MongoDB database. For this we use the mongodump command.  First open the Windows command prompt and go to the location in which MongoDB is installed. If you have chosen the default setting, while installing MongoDB though the pop-up it will be installed in a location like C:\Program Files\MongoDB\Server\4.4\bin The version number only will change if you are reading this blog in the future. Also, note that it’s better to run the command prompt in the Admin mode. So, once we open the command prompt, we need to change the directory to MongoDB bin folder by giving the below command. cd C:\Program Files\MongoDB\Server\4.4\binNow, enter mongod and press enter. It will show some json text.Now, we can backup to any location. For this post I am backing up on my Desktop in a Backup folder, which I have created through the command line.Now, we have to run mongodump command, but it should be also present in our MongoDB bin folder. If it is not present, we need to download it from and install it. After this, copy the entire exe files from the download to the MongoDB bin folder. MongoDB Backup with no option Now, run the mongodump command from the bin directory. Here, we are not giving any argument so the backup of the whole database will be taken in the same bin directory.MongoDB Backup to an output directory Now, run the mongodump command from the bin directory. Here, the argument –out specifies the directory in which the data backup will be maintained. In our case we are giving the Backup folder in the  Desktop, which we have created earlier. mongodump --out C:\Users\pc\Desktop\Backup Now, go to the desktop and you can find the backup that has been created in our Backup folder.  MongoDB Backup a specific database Now, we can also backup only a database in mongodump using the –db option. I have an example database, so to backup only that I will use the below command. mongodump --db example --out C:\Users\pc\Desktop\Backup As, you can see in the below output only the example database was backed up. MongoDB Backup a specific collection Now, if we want to only backup a specific collection, we need to use the –collection option and give the collection name. Also, note that the database name is mandatory in this case, as mongodb needs to know about the database to search for the collection. I have a products collection within the example database, so to backup only that I will use the below command. mongodump --db example --out C:\Users\pc\Desktop\Backup –collection products As, you can see in the below output only the products collection from example database was backed up. MongoDB Backup from remote MongoDB instances We can get the backup from remote mongodb instances also. I have a lot of MongoDB databases for my personal projects on MongoDB atlas, which is the free to use Cloud database for MongoDB. To get a backup of remote databases, we have to use the connection string with –uri parameter. I used the below command. mongodump --uri "mongodb+srv://xxxx:xxxxxxxxxxx@cluster0.suvl2.mongodb.net/xxxxxDB?retryWrites=true&w=majority" --out C:\Users\pc\Desktop\Backup You can see in the below output the backup of the remote instance. MongoDB Backup procedures We should try to make the backup procedure as automated as possible. One of the best ways is to use a cron job, so that it can run every day. As, discussed earlier it is best to run the backup in the night when the database has the least load.  Setting up a cron job is easier on a Linux or a Mac because the Windows equivalent of it is not good. Alternatively, you can do install mongodb in WSL2 for Windows which supports Ubuntu.  Suppose, on a Linux host which has a mongoDB instance running, you want to run the backup at 04:04 am daily. For this in the terminal, open the cron editor by running the below command in the terminal. sudo crontab –e Now, in the cron editor, you need to add a command like below for our case. 4 4 * * * mongodump --out /var/backups/mongobackups/`date +"%m-%d-%y"`Restoring and migrating a MongoDB database When we restore the MongoDB database from a backup, we will be able to take the exact copy of the MongoDB information, including the indexes. We restore MongoDB by using the command mongorestore, which works only with the binary backup produced by mongodump. Now, we have taken the backup of example database earlier and it is in our Backup folder. We will use the below command to restore it. In the arguments we will specify the name of the database first with –db option. After that with –drop, we make sure that the example database is first dropped. And in the final argument, we specify the path of our backup. mongorestore --db example --drop C:\Users\pc\Desktop\Backup\example Now, if we check in terminal, we have our example database restored properly. Conclusion In this article, we have learned about MongoDB backup and restore. We have learned the different options for the backups, and why and when backups are required. Keep learning! 
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Back Up, Restore, and Migrate a MongoDB Database

Popular among both enterprises and startups, Mong... Read More

How to Work With Forms In JavaScript

Forms also referred as web forms are a very important part of front end web application development for sake of interaction with users. Most commonly, forms are used to collect the data from users or provide a provision for user to control the user interface. Forms are great potential assets if correctly used in building an interactive web application. We would be touch basing some of the essential aspects of them like HTML structure, styling form controls, events, data validation and submitting data to server.Understanding forms in detail needs expertise in other areas than just HTML like styling form controls (CSS), scripting to validate or create custom controls (JavaScript).We would be referring or using libraries like Jquery (for document traversal, manipulation etc) and parsley (form validation library) to build better forms.A typical form’s HTML is made of HTML elements called as form controls like single or multiline text fields, dropdowns, checkboxes, button etc mostly created using element with specific type being set on Type attribute. These form controls can be programmed to add some validations to support specific values based on constraints set on them. These controls can be enriched to support accessibility for enabling the interaction for less privileged users.Let’s create a simple html page to build a form.           Learning Forms       All forms have to start with element which is container having the form fields user would interact with. All attributes of element are optional but for programming forms to capture data we need at least ‘action’ and ‘method’ attributes.action – is basically the URL where the form fields data would be sent to.method – corresponds to the HTTP method to submit the form data. Possible HTTP method names which can be set as values are post and get. And another value dialog is set when form is imbedded inside a .Note: Both formaction and formmethod can be overridden by button, input with type submit elements which we will learn as we go forward.Refer to this link to know more about form attributes.Let’s add a form element to our body with action (“”) and method(“get”). This implies that form will send a GET request to the current URL. If it is post then it would be a POST request to the URL in action. Add few fields to form say name, email and a submit button using with type being specified as text, email and submit respectively.Note: The tag is an empty element, meaning that it doesn't need a closing tag. Value attribute can be populated to set the default value.          Enter your name:                    Enter your email:                       Save and open the html in chrome or your preferred browser. Clicking on ‘Click me!’ should send a http get call with empty name and email.Note: We can use instead of with type as submit. The difference is that button can contain HTML content allowing to create a complex button whereas input allows only plain text.Let’s understand the Sending of form data.If we observer all the form fields again, we have added an attribute called ‘name’. This property is important to inform that which data is associated with which form field i.e. name/value pairs. Try adding some data to our fields rendering in html (say myName and first.last@email.com) and click submit button. You should see the data being sent as query parameters in the browser URL.?name=myName&email=first.last@email.com.Change the Form method value to POST instead of GET and send the submitted data by clicking the ‘Click me!’ button. You should be seeing Form Data being sent but the browser URL will not get update.name: myName email: first.last@email.comAll this while, we have our action method being set as empty. Replace this with another URL on server side say ‘/captureFormData’. Now on clicking submit button the data should be received by the script at ‘/captureFormData’ with key/value items contained in the HTTP request object.Note that each server-side language like Node.js, C# etc have their own way of handling the submitted form data. And this blog would not cover those topics and it is beyond the scope.Let’s refine our basic form structure with help of other HTML elements like , , etc. Though we used few of them in basic example. Let’s go little deep on them.Note: Nesting of form inside another form is unacceptable as it might result in unpredictable behavior. is a convenient way of grouping for sake of styling and semantic purpose. This control can be associated with so that some assistive technologies can read this legend and associate it with the controls inside the . Let’s understand this will an example:         Interested programming language                             JavaScript                                     CSharp                                     Java               When reading the above form by any screen readers, it will read as “Interested programming language JavaScript” for the first radio, “Interested programming language CSharp” and “Interested programming language Java” for second and third radio.Imagine if you have a long form with multiple fields. It would help to improve the usability if we can categorize/section them with the help of . It would even help to improve the accessibility of forms.Talking about accessibility, with the associated correctly with the via its for attribute (which contains the element's id attribute), a screenreader will read out something like "name, edit text" for below one.Enter your name: Another advantage of having label associated with input of type text, radio etc is they are clickable too.  If you click on a label then the associated input control will get the focus. If the input control is of type checkbox or radio, clicking on label will select the check box and radio. This will be useful as clickable area of checkbox or radio is small and having label gives provision to select it easily.Note: We can always associate multiple labels to a single input control but it is not a good idea as it will impact the accessibility and assistive technologies. along with can be used to separate the functionality in a form and group the same purpose elements like radio buttons.Here is an example of the same.               Contact information                   Title                                                                             Mr                                                                                                 Mrs                                                                               Name:                                                           E-mail:                                                           Password:                                                 Additional information                               Social type:                                 LinkedIn             Twitter             Instagram                                                 Phone number:                                                           Submit                   Every time you like to create an HTML form you need to start using element and  nesting all the content controls inside it. Most of the assistive technologies and browser plugins can help to discover elements and implement special hooks to make them easier to use.We have already some of the form elements like , , , , , and . Other common input types are button, checkbox, file, hidden, image, password, radio, reset, submit, and text.Input types.Attributes of Input.Few attributes on element help in validating the data like required, max, maxlength, min, minlength, multiple, pattern, step etc based on their respective type.Also other attributes on of type submit/image like formaction, formmethod, formnovalidate, formenctype etc helps in overriding the form level methods.ValidationBefore submitting the data to the server, it is important to perform some client side validation to avoid unwanted round trips. Client-side validation is needed but it is not a replacement to the server side validation. Advantage of having client side validation is to capture the invalid data and fix it immediately.Some of the important and popular checks which are most commonly used on client areField requiredSpecific data formatEnter valid email addressPassword and more…Let’s build a form with the above validation checks.                         Do you have experience in programming ?*                     Yes           No                             How many years of experience you have ?                                     What's your programming language?*                           TypeScript           Java           CSharp           Ruby           Go           Swift                             What's your company e-mail address?                             Cover letter                             Submit       Say, if we enter an value which is more than 40 in experience field. We should see an inbuilt error as shown below:All these validations and notifications are coming out of the box. Thanks to inbuilt functionality in control. Let’s see how we can perform validation of forms using JavaScript and take control of look and feel of error message.Most browsers support constraint validation API by providing few validation properties on HTML elements like , , , etc.validationMessage: we can customize this message if the control value failed validation otherwise it will return an empty string. It is dependent on other constraint i.e. willValidate and isValid.willValidate: If element is validated then it will be true otherwise false.validity: is the validity state of the element and it is dependent on other properties likepatternMatch for specified pattern attribute,tooLong and tooShort are for string fields based on maxLength and minLengthrangeOverflow and rangeUnderflow for numeric fields based on max and min attributestypeMatch for fields which are based on email or url.valid if all the validation constraints are metvalueMissing if the field is set as required.Along with properties, we do also have methods to perform validation like checkValidity() which returns true or false and setCustomValidity(message) is to set the message if the element is considered invalid. Also if the element is invalid then checkValidity will raise an event called invalid Event.Let’s create a simple form and customize the validation message.       Please enter an email address:             Submit     Add a script tag and customize the message as shown below:     const email = document.getElementById("mail");     email.addEventListener("input", function (event) {       if (email.validity.typeMismatch) {         email.setCustomValidity("I am expecting an e-mail address!");       } else {         email.setCustomValidity("");       }     });   Here we are listening to the input event on email field and checking if the validity on the control is valid or not and based on that we are setting the custom message.Here are we relying on inbuilt validation method. Let’s disable the validation at form level by with the help of ‘novalidate’ and take control over validation. This would mean the browser will not perform auto check on validation before sending the data. But still we have access to constraint validation API to perform validation ourself.Refine the above form to add few addition validation like required and minLength etc.               Please enter an email address:                             Submit     Let’s update the script to handle the validation     const form  = document.getElementsByTagName('form')[0];     const email = document.getElementById('mail');     const emailError = document.querySelector('#mail + span.error');     email.addEventListener('input', function (event) {       // Each time the user types something, we check if the form fields are valid.       if (email.validity.valid) {         // In case there is an error message visible, if the field is valid, we remove the error message.         emailError.textContent = ''; // Reset the content of the message         emailError.className = 'error'; // Reset the visual state of the message       } else {         // If there is still an error, show the correct error         showError();       }     });     form.addEventListener('submit', function (event) {       // if the email field is valid, we let the form submit       if(!email.validity.valid) {         // If it isn't, we display an appropriate error message         showError();         // Then we prevent the form from being sent by cancelling the event         event.preventDefault();       }     });     function showError() {       if(email.validity.valueMissing) {         // If the field is empty display the following error message.         emailError.textContent = 'You need to enter an e-mail address.';       } else if(email.validity.typeMismatch) {         // If the field doesn't contain an email address display the following error message.         emailError.textContent = 'Invalid value is entered, expected an e-mail address.';       } else if(email.validity.tooShort) {         // If the data is too short display the following error message.         emailError.textContent = `Email should be at least ${ email.minLength } characters; you entered ${ email.value.length }.`;       }       // Set the styling appropriately       emailError.className = 'error active';     } Reload the HTML and try entering an invalid email address, the corresponding error message should be displayed.Note: In the current scope of this blog, we are not working on styling.Is it possible to validate forms without built in APIs ? Let’s see with the same example.We would consider the same form again but have lot of functionality in                           Please enter an email address:                                             Submit           const form  = document.getElementsByTagName('form')[0];     const email = document.getElementById('mail');     let error = email.nextElementSibling;     const emailRegExp = /^[a-zA-Z0-9.!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+@[a-zA-Z0-9-]+(?:\.[a-zA-Z0-9-]+)*$/;     function addEvent(element, event, callback) {       let previousEventCallBack = element["on"+event];       element["on"+event] = function (e) {         const output = callback(e);         // A callback that returns `false` stops the callback chain and interrupts the execution of the event callback.         if (output === false) return false;         if (typeof previousEventCallBack === 'function') {           output = previousEventCallBack(e);           if(output === false) return false;         }       }     };     // Now we can rebuild our validation constraint. Because we do not rely on CSS pseudo-class, we have to explicitly set the valid/invalid class on our email field     addEvent(window, "load", function () {       // Here, we test if the field is empty (remember, the field is not required)       // If it is not, we check if its content is a well-formed e-mail address.       const test = email.value.length === 0 || emailRegExp.test(email.value);       email.className = test ? "valid" : "invalid";     });     // This defines what happens when the user types in the fiel     addEvent(email, "input", function () {       const test = email.value.length === 0 || emailRegExp.test(email.value);       if (test) {         email.className = "valid";         error.textContent = "";         error.className = "error";       } else {         email.className = "invalid";       }     });     // This defines what happens when the user tries to submit the data     addEvent(form, "submit", function () {       const test = email.value.length === 0 || emailRegExp.test(email.value);       if (!test) {         email.className = "invalid";         error.textContent = "Expecting an e-mail";         error.className = "error active";         return false;       } else {         email.className = "valid";         error.textContent = "";         error.className = "error";       }     });   On refreshing the page, the output with invalid email address should be displayed as shown below.In real time applications, we can rely on existing libraries like Parsley along with JQuery which would ease our life by taking away lot of complexity.Overview of Parsley:Parsley is a front-end javascript validation library which helps to give proper feedback to user on submission of form. As mentioned earlier, it is not a replacement of server side validation. Parsley library helps us to define our own validation.Parsley uses a DOM API namely ‘data-parsley-’ prefix on the existing properties. For example if we want to add this on a property say ‘sample’ then we would add as [data-parsley-sample=’value’]. This will allow us to configure pretty much everything without any configuration or custom function.There is no specific installation process but adding the corresponding script tags will enable the validation. Parsley is relied on Jquery so it has to be included as well.             ...                 $('#form').parsley();     Assumption is that we have downloaded the Jquery and Parsley minified librarie and added it to our working directory. Otherwise we can refer to CDN location as shown below.   Adding attribute ‘data-parsley-validate’ to each form will allow us to validate. And “$(‘#form’).parsley()” will manually bind Parsley to your forms.Let’s understand further by configuring the attributes via JavaScript. For which, lets add two input fields inside the form element.                 Also let’s update the content to perform some pre-defined validation based on attributes.       var instance = $('#first').parsley();       console.log(instance.isValid()); // maxlength is 42, so field is valid       $('#first').attr('data-parsley-maxlength', 4);       console.log(instance.isValid()); // No longer valid, as maxlength is 4       // You can access and override options in javascript too:       instance.options.maxlength++;       console.log(instance.isValid()); // Back to being valid, as maxlength is 5       // Alternatively, the options can be specified as:       var otherInstance = $('#second').parsley({         maxlength: 10       });       console.log(otherInstance.options);     In the console.log, we should see thistrue false true {maxlength: 10}Options are inherited from the global level to form level and further to field. So if we set the options at global level then the same can be observed at field level.   Parsley.options.maxlength = 42; // maxlength of 42 is declared at global level var formInstance = $('form').parsley(); var field = $('input').parsley(); console.log(field.options.maxlength); // Shows that maxlength is 42 inherited from global Parsley.options.maxlength = 30; console.log(field.options.maxlength); // Shows that maxlength is automatically 30 formInstance.options.maxlength++; console.log(field.options.maxlength); // Shows that maxlength is automatically 31We can also add our own custom validations. Let understand this with an example.                     window.Parsley.addValidator('multipleOf', {         requirementType: 'integer',         validateNumber: function(value, requirement) {           return 0 === value % requirement;         },         messages: {           en: 'This value should be a multiple of %s',         }       });     Here we are adding a new attribute namely ‘data-parsley-multiple-of’ which takes only numeric values which are multiples of 3.In window.Parsley, we added a new validator with name ‘multiple-of’ with an object containing few important properties like ‘requirementType’, ‘validateNumber’ and ‘messages’ to be shown. This properties helps the library to check if the input value is valid or not.Similar to validateNumber, other properties are also there for different types like validateString, validateDate and validateMultiple.Also for requirementType, we have different options like string, number, date, regexp, boolean etc.Messages by default has English format, to support multiple locales we need to add the specific localization and also add specific locale.Events: Parsley triggers events that allows ParsleyUI to work and for performance reasons they don’t rely on JQuery events but the usage is similar to JQuery i.e. parsley events will also bubble up like JQuery events. For example, if a field is validated then the event ‘field:validate’ will be triggred on the field instance then on to form instance and finally to the window.Parsley.$('#some-input').parsley().on('field:success', function() {         // In here, `this` is the parlsey instance of #some-input       });       window.Parsley.on('field:error', function() {         // This global callback will be called for any field that fails validation.         console.log('Validation failed for: ', this.$element);       });Many times, we need some validation based on the response from server. Parsley provides an attributes i.e. data-parsley-remote and data-parsley-remote-validator to perform the same.Let’s consider this HTMLLet’s add the async validator on the window.Parsley object.window.Parsley.addAsyncValidator('customValidator', function (xhr) {           console.log(this.$element); // jQuery Object[ input[name="q"] ]           return 404 === xhr.status;         }, 'customURL');Parsley is a very useful and powerful JavaScript form frontend validation library.Note: For developers building react based web applications, they can rely on FORMIK which is most popular library for building forms in React and React Native.ConclusionForms are important in HTML and it was needed and still needed now. is an html tag that allow us to perform HTTP methods like GET/POST operation without writing any code in JavaScript. Form defines an boundary to identify all set of the form field elements to be submitted to the server. For example, if we perform an enter key or clicking on submit button , the agent triggers form submission data based on each form field value to the server based on the action URL on the form.Before HTML5, all the elements are expected to be part of the to send the data to server. In HTML5, they maintained the backward compatibility and also enhanced the capabilities who may want to use AJAX and don’t want to rely on default behaviours i.e. they have enabled designers who expect more flexibility in having their form elements outside the form and still maintain the connections with the form. 
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How to Work With Forms In JavaScript

Forms also referred as web forms are a very import... Read More

Introduction to Web APIs in JavaScript

Before we talk about APIs in JavaScript and how to use them, we need to know what exactly we mean by APIs. API stands for Application Programming Interface and is a concept that is not limited or specific to JavaScript, but is used in almost all web application languages. Being a web developer, it is expected that you know about API, so let’s try to understand the concept first. As a concept, API has been there since more than 50 years, but in recent years it has become very popular and has outlined a different method for how we create our applications. Now imagine you are creating a web application where users can sign up and talk about their recent travels, write stories, post pictures and share them. As an add-on they should be able to share the same across multiple platforms like Facebook, Instagram etc. How do we do that? We don’t have access to the Instagram application or their data. We don’t know how they are managing their data and whether data from our application will fit into their databases.  Let’s try to imagine how Instagram would allow add-on without APIs. Perhaps we might drop an email to Instagram asking them to allow us access to their databases where we can write content. They may have received millions of other such requests from people who also need to use Instagram add-ons. Instagram will go through our requests and the million others and probably would use a lucky draw to decide who gets access to their databases. This is obviously not a reasonable solution and without any reasonable solution all applications in the world will just become isolated; which means they can’t communicate and can’t support each other’s features. Luckily our imagination is just that!Fortunately, we are living in a world with APIs around us which allow us to easily communicate with other apps. I can create an application where I can use Google’s search, Facebook’s feed, Instagram’s post, twitter’s tweets all in one app. This is all possible using API. As the name suggests, it allows us to open an interface which can then be used by other apps to communicate using the interface. How does an API work?The purpose of API is to communicate between apps with each other as intermediary, where both apps might have been built with different tools and technologies. It can be achieved by using api standards like REST, SOAP which outline protocols or sets of rules which the client (who needs to call) and server (who serves client’s requests) need to follow. These standards are key to communication. These standards outline what a request should look like and the format in which client should expect response from server. Every api exposes its endpoints (also called entrypoints), which allows its client to use it to access features of apis. For example, in JavaScript, to work with DOM, it exposes Document as an entrypoint in order to work with multiple methods. It allows its client to use it in order to manipulate DOM. In JavaScript however we use containers, which are nothing but HTML controls which can call APIs and response can be rendered within that control. JavaScript: An Introduction JavaScript is one of the most widely used programming languages, even though it is mainly used on browsers to render HTML and CSS. It can also run on our servers to handle client requests, connect with databases and do almost everything any other programming language does on the server. This makes it a significant tool that needs to be learned. Here, we are going to discuss about APIs which are provided by JavaScript to work with almost every aspect of a web application. APIs in JavaScript JavaScript, being a very widely used programming language has a very large set of APIs available, which make a JavaScript developer’s life a lot easier. JavaScript is also a multi-purpose language which means it can not only work on browsers, but also on servers or phones. To support different platforms, it has a different set of APIs to work with. It also provides a rich set of controls and other features like storage on client which are all easily availed by JavaScript.  Browser APIs in JavaScript Browsers use JavaScript to display web pages, handle user interactions, send requests to servers and to receive responses. To make all this possible, JavaScript provides browser APIs which can be used to perform browser related functions:  Working with DOM  DOM stands for Document Object Model, which is a structure that holds all HTML controls on a web page. It not only holds but also allows us to add remove controls from it. You might have worked with document API which is used to get, push or even remove elements from DOM, all of this is coming from JavaScript DOM API. Example: document.getElementById(“header”).text(“This is a header”); Request data from server JavaScript is widely used to optimize web pages by updating only a part of a webpage instead of loading the entire page. for example, when you like a post on Facebook, it doesn’t load the entire page again, it only updates that particular post. Similarly, when we tweet on Twitter it doesn’t reload the entire page to show new tweets. This is how JavaScript makes partial calls to the server using popular fetch, AJAX apis. Example: const response= await fetch(url); // when response is success which is status 200 if (response.ok) {     // receive response from server.   let json = await response.json(); } else {   // if there are errors returned by server, show the error   alert("Error occured" + response.status); }Store data at client Even though we have our databases working smoothly on servers processing terabytes of data every day, you might still want to store a chunk of data on the client’s browsers to optimize the application performances. How do we do that? Again JavaScript will show us the way, by providing APIs like localStorage, sessionStorage which we can use to store data on client’s browser and remove it whenever we want. The difference between localStorage and sessionStorgae is that data which we store in localStorage persists even after closing the browser or tab,  whereas data stored in sessionStorage gets cleared as soon as the tab or browser is closed. Now both of these have its own advantages depending on your requirement.sessionStorage.setItem('key', value); sessionStorage.getItem('key')   localStorage.setItem('key', value); sessionStorage.getItem('key';)Work with Graphics There are lot of popular applications where you might have seen  2D or 3D graphics created using user’s interaction allowing users to create such drawings, and I am not talking about just CSS (Cascaded Style Sheets). Yes, CSS has its role to play, but to allow users to create 2D/3D drawings on the web we need more than just CSS. JavaScript provides canvas api which can be used to work with pixels on web page to draw 2D/ 3D images which will be within html tag.Third Party APIs.  Integration with other applications, the structures of which we don’t have much information about, can be difficult. But JavaScript allows us to integrate with many popular third-party apps like Twitter, YouTube, Facebook. For example, you have your company’s website where you also want to display recent tweets that your company’s Twitter account has tweeted. How do we do that? JavaScript’s Twitter API is the answer. This is not only for Twitter, but a lot of other popular apps can be integrated into your own web page using JavaScript’s third party APIs. Web Audio API  Audio API in JavaScript provides a smooth implementation of audio controls over a webpage. This includes multiple play controls on audio, and audio effects on the web. Web Audio API has multiple interfaces which include operations related to visualization effects, audio destinations, merging audio channels and audio processing. Example      Play   Geolocation APIThere are many web apps which work best with information of user’s locations, for example, if you are looking for restaurants nearby, you will get better results if Google knows your location. It is obviously up to the user’s consent if they want to share their location or not due to privacy concerns, but if they do want to share, geolocation API provides location of users to web applications. Example: var address = document.getElementById("address"); function accessUserLocation() {   if (navigator.geolocation) { navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(displayLocation); } } function displayLocation(location) { address.innerHTML = "Latitude: " + location.coords.latitude +   "Longitude: " + location.coords.longitude;   }History API  History API is another useful although rarely used API, used if you want to allow user to traverse back and forth on a web application. History API runs with window objects using three different methods available-- go, back and forward. Example: // Visit page visited previously  window.history.back();  // Traverse to forward on web page.  window.history.forward();  // Move forward by 1 page  window.history.go(1); Web Workers API  Workers can be created using constructors in JavaScript, which can run a JavaScript file under worker thread context, which is different from the context of windows in JavaScript. There are a few exceptions on what kind of code we can run under worker thread, for example we can’t manipulate DOM using worker thread. With this a question arises-- if worker thread is different form main window thread, then how do they communicate? Because even though it is running in a different thread, the worker can still execute many window methods. To make this possible, the worker and main thread communicate using postMessage() method; to send data whenever onmessage event is called and handled. Example: const worker = new Worker('input.js'); Here input file which is a JavaScript file will contain the code which you need the worker thread to execute. Most Popular JavaScript APIs Browser APIs – We have discussed them in detail and since JavaScript leads how web applications are rendered on browser, the popularity of browser APIs is obvious. Canvas APIs – This is another favorite API of many developers who work in the graphics domain and need interactive applications for their client to easily work with drawings and graphics on web pages. SocialMedia APIs – This is very common nowadays. Any web application that targets an audience, needs social media integrations in their app, such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram APIs, where they can showcase recent activities on their web page. Storage APIs – Every site I browse now a days pops up a panel asking me to accept cookies settings. Why? Because it helps the applications work well with user’s interaction and responses to the app, and the storage is not limited to cookies. sessionStorage and localStorage are widely used in JavaScript applications to store user’s info on client’s browsers. We just can’t imagine a life without storage APIs in JavaScript! JavaScript tools and relationship between themJavaScript Libraries There are JavaScript libraries like jQuery and React which implement JavaScript with their own new syntax. For example, the way we access our DOM using vanilla JavaScript and the way jQuery does it is different, but in the end, both use the same API which we have discussed above. Another example is when using React, where it extends JavaScript with JSX to embed JavaScript with HTML in React components.JavaScript FrameworksJavaScript Frameworks like Angular and Vue make most of the JavaScript APIs as they are built on top of JavaScript. The difference between the frameworks is in the structure, data flow and different patterns which they use to make it easier to work with JavaScript and implement its APIs.  For example, Angular uses Dependency Injection to inject services into the component’s constructors, making it a sophisticated form of implementing inversion control which would be not this smooth with vanilla JavaScript. Frameworks like Angular try to prevent users from manipulating DOM directly as it is an expensive operation. However, it doesn’t mean it doesn’t update DOM at all. In the end, Angular uses DOM manipulation internally in quite an effective way, using the same APIs we have discussed above.Conclusion An API can be compared to a phone with unlimited talk time that is given to an application, allowing it to communicate with all other applications in the world. Why do we need this? Because one application doesn’t need to and can’t do everything. They need each other’s help. APIs can be for external as well internal use. External APIs allows an app to communicate with other apps, and internal or built-in APIs allow developers to work effectively with the tools. JavaScript being the most popular language in the world is aware of this and hence presents plenty of interfaces for us as developers to use in our applications. Be it working with storage, creating controls, integrating with Twitter, presenting media, or drawing graphics, JavaScript will not let you down.  
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Introduction to Web APIs in JavaScript

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