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PMI-PBA vs CBAP: Which One Should You Go For?

To increase your job opportunities, taking the PMI-PBA (Project Management Institute – Professional in Business Analysis) or CBAP (Certification of Competency in Business Analysis) exam is a great idea. Both exams will give you a new level of qualification that can make your resume stand out. If you’re debating between the two, this article may help you decide which one should you go for. All About The PMI-PBA The PMI-PBA is exclusively for those business analysts who manage programs and projects. They typically conduct business analysis on an everyday basis. If you pass the PMI-PBA, you’ll get a certification that will prove your ability to work efficiently with stakeholders and make sure that projects produce successful business outcomes. In order to receive a PMI-PBA, you must meet the following requirements: ● Have a minimum of 3 years (or 4,500 hours) of business analysis experience over the past 8 consecutive years. This is only if you have a bachelor’s degree, or 5 years (7,500 hours) of experience if you don’t have one. ● Have 2,000 hours of experience working on project teams over the past eight consecutive years. ● Have 35 contact hours of business analysis education. What The PMI-PBA Exam Covers You’ll be tested on needs assessment, which will take up approximately 18% of your paper, planning, which will take about 22%, analysis, which will take about 35%, monitoring and trace ability, which will take about 15%, and finally, evaluation, which will make up the remaining 10%. Why Opt For The PMI-PBA Exam? Having the certification from this exam will give you a new perspective on business analysis and project management. In terms of your career options, this means a higher number of job opportunities and an even higher salary. What you should keep in mind, though, is that if you do pass the exam, you’ll be facing much more challenging work than what you’re used to. The PMI PBA is recommended for ● Business analysts with a project or program management background ● Business analysts with a PMP certification ● PMP certified professionals who have handled business analytics before PMI-PBA is for business analysts who work on projects and programs and have project management experience in their career, where as in contrast, IIBA® looks at Business Analysis in a much broader prospective and covers activities that exceeds project and program and applies to the entire organisational involvement/initiative. What You Need To Know About The CBAP Exam Recipients of the CCBA certification tend to work in the areas of consulting, process improvement, requirements management or analysis, and systems analysis. In order to take this exam, there are certain qualifications you have to meet: ● Have at least 3,750 hours of BA work experience over the past seven years. ● Have at least 900 hours in two of the six knowledge areas, or 500 hours in four of the six knowledge areas. ● Have at least 21 hours of professional development in the past four years. ● Have a high school education or an equivalent. ● Produce two references from a client, career manager, or other CBAP recipient. ● Sign a code of conduct. More importantly, this is one exam you can’t just ‘cram’ for. Candidates will require more knowledge than the basic things anyone can memorise, as the test is also application based. Ultimately, the choice to take either the PMI-PBA or CBAP exam is up to you. Both have their benefits, and both will definitely boost your career options. Whichever exam you choose to take, you’re guaranteed to be wanted by a large number of recruiters.
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PMI-PBA vs CBAP: Which One Should You Go For?

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PMI-PBA vs CBAP: Which One Should You Go For?

To increase your job opportunities, taking the PMI-PBA (Project Management Institute – Professional in Business Analysis) or CBAP (Certification of Competency in Business Analysis) exam is a great idea. Both exams will give you a new level of qualification that can make your resume stand out.

If you’re debating between the two, this article may help you decide which one should you go for.

All About The PMI-PBA

The PMI-PBA is exclusively for those business analysts who manage programs and projects. They typically conduct business analysis on an everyday basis. If you pass the PMI-PBA, you’ll get a certification that will prove your ability to work efficiently with stakeholders and make sure that projects produce successful business outcomes.

In order to receive a PMI-PBA, you must meet the following requirements:

● Have a minimum of 3 years (or 4,500 hours) of business analysis experience over the past 8 consecutive years. This is only if you have a bachelor’s degree, or 5 years (7,500 hours) of experience if you don’t have one.
● Have 2,000 hours of experience working on project teams over the past eight consecutive years.
● Have 35 contact hours of business analysis education.

What The PMI-PBA Exam Covers

You’ll be tested on needs assessment, which will take up approximately 18% of your paper, planning, which will take about 22%, analysis, which will take about 35%, monitoring and trace ability, which will take about 15%, and finally, evaluation, which will make up the remaining 10%.

Why Opt For The PMI-PBA Exam?

Having the certification from this exam will give you a new perspective on business analysis and project management. In terms of your career options, this means a higher number of job opportunities and an even higher salary.
What you should keep in mind, though, is that if you do pass the exam, you’ll be facing much more challenging work than what you’re used to. The PMI PBA is recommended for
● Business analysts with a project or program management background
● Business analysts with a PMP certification
● PMP certified professionals who have handled business analytics before

PMI-PBA is for business analysts who work on projects and programs and have project management experience in their career, where as in contrast, IIBA® looks at Business Analysis in a much broader prospective and covers activities that exceeds project and program and applies to the entire organisational involvement/initiative.

What You Need To Know About The CBAP Exam

Recipients of the CCBA certification tend to work in the areas of consulting, process improvement, requirements management or analysis, and systems analysis.

In order to take this exam, there are certain qualifications you have to meet:

● Have at least 3,750 hours of BA work experience over the past seven years.
● Have at least 900 hours in two of the six knowledge areas, or 500 hours in four of the six knowledge areas.
● Have at least 21 hours of professional development in the past four years.
● Have a high school education or an equivalent.
● Produce two references from a client, career manager, or other CBAP recipient.
● Sign a code of conduct.

More importantly, this is one exam you can’t just ‘cram’ for. Candidates will require more knowledge than the basic things anyone can memorise, as the test is also application based.

Ultimately, the choice to take either the PMI-PBA or CBAP exam is up to you. Both have their benefits, and both will definitely boost your career options. Whichever exam you choose to take, you’re guaranteed to be wanted by a large number of recruiters.

KnowledgeHut

KnowledgeHut

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KnowledgeHut is a fast growing Management Consulting and Training firm that is a source of Intelligent Information support for businesses and professionals across the globe.


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1 comments

Amory 11 Jan 2017

Apiceriatpon for this information is over 9000-thank you!

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