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10 Characteristics Of a Good Project Manager

Good leaders are hard to find, but great project managers are rarer still – What a great saying! Well, it has its own worth acknowledging that to find a reliable, and successful project manager in the current era is like finding a true pearl inside the sea shell. Being a project manager is a specific kind of leadership position, which requires certain character traits and qualities. If we ask you, do you have any general idea about a good project manager, a single point you can define them would be – they delivers projects within the deadline and budget set by the clients, meeting or notwithstanding surpassing the desires of the partners, right? It’s not enough. Actually, it takes more to become a good and idol project manager to whom someone could admire. In this article, we are going to highlight some striking traits and qualities of a Good project manager which can help you become a better one or to improve yourself.Time Management techniques helps you to assign correct time slots to activities as per their importance. The right allocation of time to the right task in order to make the best possible use of time refers to time management. Top 10 Qualities to become a Successful Project Manager   1. They Inspire a Shared Vision An effective project leader is often described as having a vision of where to go and the ability to articulate it. A leader or project manager is someone who lifts you up, gives you a reason of being, and gives the vision and spirit to change. The visionary project managers enable people to feel they have a real stake in the project. Moreover, they empower their team mates to experience the vision of their own and offer other the opportunity to create their own vision, to explore what the vision will mean to their jobs and their lives, as well as to envision their future as part of the vision of their organization. 2.    They are a Good Communicator According to Jada Pinkett Smith, a slogan of every good project manager is; “My belief is that communication is the best way to create strong relationships” Another strong trait that distinguishes a good project manager from others is, their ability to communicate with people at all levels. Since, the project leadership calls for clear communication about responsibility, goals, performance, expectations, and feedback – a good project manager can be said a complete package comprising all these qualities. The pioneer must be able to successfully arrange and utilize influence when it’s important to guarantee the accomplishment of group and venture. How it comes about gainful? Successful correspondence brings about group accomplishments by making express rules for professional success of cable car individuals. 3.    Integrity One of the most important things any project manager should always keep in their mind is, it takes their actions to set a particular modus operandi for a team, rather than their words. A good management demands commitment and demonstration of ethical practices. The leadership or project management depends on integrity represents set of values, dedication to honesty, and consistency in behaviors with team mates. Integrity is that a good project manager takes responsibility for setting the high bar for ethical behaviors for oneself, as well as reward those who exemplify these practices. Leadership motivated by self-interest does not serve the wellbeing of a team. 4.    They Possess Leadership Skills If you want to become a successful project manager, you ought to own good leadership skills. Project managers must also deal with teams coming from various walks of life. Hence, it winds up noticeably basic for them to rouse workers and calibrate group execution to achieve organizational goals through various leadership styles. A great project manager sets the tone for the project and provide a clear vision about its objectives for the team. A feeling of foreknowledge helps also – by foreseeing potential issues, you can have your group prepared to solve them in the blink of the eye. Enthusiasm and passion are two key elements you should adopt, if you want to make people follow you—nobody will do so if you’re sporting a negative attitude. 5.They are Good Decision Maker Good decision making skill is not only crucial for personal life but it also very important in professional life as well. The good project managers are empowered to make countless decisions which will help define the project track. As we all know that a single minor wrong decision taken can easily jeopardize the entire project. Thus, a project manager needs to be capable of thinking quickly and reacting decisively. 6.    Expert in Task Delegation Task delegation is another basic skill in you which you need to be expert in. You should be able to judge your team members’ skills and assign the tasks in accordance with their strengths. Being a pioneer doesn’t imply that you have to consider each minor little detail of a venture. Show your team members you trust them and delegate tasks to them. 7.    They are Well Organized Henry Mintzberg said; “Management is, above all, a practice where art, science, and craft meet” Good organization is a key factor for creating a productive work environment as well as solving problems under pressure. Being well-organized helps to stay focused on the big picture and to prioritize your own tasks and responsibilities. With regards to exhibiting your outcomes, you ought to have the capacity to recuperate all the important information and demonstrate an intelligible vision of a venture to be executed. 8.    They Own Proficiency Proficiency and thorough knowledge – they both can be said a basic yardsticks on the basis of which a leader’s or manager wisdom or excellence can be weighed. Being on top of your projects entails a vast amount of industry knowledge to be effective in what you do. Some learning on the money related and legitimate side of your tasks won’t hurt either. You should be seen as able and skilled by your group. 9.    They are Great Problem Solver! The good project managers work with a team of experts or consultants and use their mastery of handling issues in most effective ways. Nobody will anticipate that you will have a prepared answer for every single issue; you should have the capacity to utilize the knowledge of your team members and even stakeholders to produce a collective response to any problems you experience on your way to delivering a project. 10.    They know what is Collaboration This is the last, and the most important trait that should exist within every good project manager or leader. A grip of group progression is fundamental on the off chance that you need your group to work easily on your ventures. When building up your group, remember this: contentions and contradictions will undoubtedly happen; as a pioneer, you’ll should have the capacity to intervene them and ensure all you colleagues progress in the direction of a similar objective.  
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10 Characteristics Of a Good Project Manager

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10 Characteristics Of a Good Project Manager

Good leaders are hard to find, but great project managers are rarer still – What a great saying! Well, it has its own worth acknowledging that to find a reliable, and successful project manager in the current era is like finding a true pearl inside the sea shell.

Being a project manager is a specific kind of leadership position, which requires certain character traits and qualities. If we ask you, do you have any general idea about a good project manager, a single point you can define them would be – they delivers projects within the deadline and budget set by the clients, meeting or notwithstanding surpassing the desires of the partners, right?

It’s not enough. Actually, it takes more to become a good and idol project manager to whom someone could admire. In this article, we are going to highlight some striking traits and qualities of a Good project manager which can help you become a better one or to improve yourself.Time Management techniques helps you to assign correct time slots to activities as per their importance. The right allocation of time to the right task in order to make the best possible use of time refers to time management.

Top 10 Qualities to become a Successful Project Manager
 

1. They Inspire a Shared Vision

An effective project leader is often described as having a vision of where to go and the ability to articulate it. A leader or project manager is someone who lifts you up, gives you a reason of being, and gives the vision and spirit to change.

The visionary project managers enable people to feel they have a real stake in the project. Moreover, they empower their team mates to experience the vision of their own and offer other the opportunity to create their own vision, to explore what the vision will mean to their jobs and their lives, as well as to envision their future as part of the vision of their organization.

2.    They are a Good Communicator

According to Jada Pinkett Smith, a slogan of every good project manager is;

My belief is that communication is the best way to create strong relationships

Another strong trait that distinguishes a good project manager from others is, their ability to communicate with people at all levels. Since, the project leadership calls for clear communication about responsibility, goals, performance, expectations, and feedback – a good project manager can be said a complete package comprising all these qualities.

The pioneer must be able to successfully arrange and utilize influence when it’s important to guarantee the accomplishment of group and venture. How it comes about gainful? Successful correspondence brings about group accomplishments by making express rules for professional success of cable car individuals.

3.    Integrity

One of the most important things any project manager should always keep in their mind is, it takes their actions to set a particular modus operandi for a team, rather than their words. A good management demands commitment and demonstration of ethical practices.

The leadership or project management depends on integrity represents set of values, dedication to honesty, and consistency in behaviors with team mates. Integrity is that a good project manager takes responsibility for setting the high bar for ethical behaviors for oneself, as well as reward those who exemplify these practices. Leadership motivated by self-interest does not serve the wellbeing of a team.

4.    They Possess Leadership Skills

If you want to become a successful project manager, you ought to own good leadership skills. Project managers must also deal with teams coming from various walks of life. Hence, it winds up noticeably basic for them to rouse workers and calibrate group execution to achieve organizational goals through various leadership styles.

A great project manager sets the tone for the project and provide a clear vision about its objectives for the team. A feeling of foreknowledge helps also – by foreseeing potential issues, you can have your group prepared to solve them in the blink of the eye. Enthusiasm and passion are two key elements you should adopt, if you want to make people follow you—nobody will do so if you’re sporting a negative attitude.

5.They are Good Decision Maker

Good decision making skill is not only crucial for personal life but it also very important in professional life as well. The good project managers are empowered to make countless decisions which will help define the project track.

As we all know that a single minor wrong decision taken can easily jeopardize the entire project. Thus, a project manager needs to be capable of thinking quickly and reacting decisively.

6.    Expert in Task Delegation

Task delegation is another basic skill in you which you need to be expert in. You should be able to judge your team members’ skills and assign the tasks in accordance with their strengths.

Being a pioneer doesn’t imply that you have to consider each minor little detail of a venture. Show your team members you trust them and delegate tasks to them.

7.    They are Well Organized

Henry Mintzberg said;

Management is, above all, a practice where art, science, and craft meet

Good organization is a key factor for creating a productive work environment as well as solving problems under pressure. Being well-organized helps to stay focused on the big picture and to prioritize your own tasks and responsibilities.

With regards to exhibiting your outcomes, you ought to have the capacity to recuperate all the important information and demonstrate an intelligible vision of a venture to be executed.

8.    They Own Proficiency

Proficiency and thorough knowledge – they both can be said a basic yardsticks on the basis of which a leader’s or manager wisdom or excellence can be weighed. Being on top of your projects entails a vast amount of industry knowledge to be effective in what you do.

Some learning on the money related and legitimate side of your tasks won’t hurt either. You should be seen as able and skilled by your group.

9.    They are Great Problem Solver!

The good project managers work with a team of experts or consultants and use their mastery of handling issues in most effective ways.

Nobody will anticipate that you will have a prepared answer for every single issue; you should have the capacity to utilize the knowledge of your team members and even stakeholders to produce a collective response to any problems you experience on your way to delivering a project.

10.    They know what is Collaboration

This is the last, and the most important trait that should exist within every good project manager or leader. A grip of group progression is fundamental on the off chance that you need your group to work easily on your ventures.

When building up your group, remember this: contentions and contradictions will undoubtedly happen; as a pioneer, you’ll should have the capacity to intervene them and ensure all you colleagues progress in the direction of a similar objective.

 

Elena

Elena Gray

Blog Author

Elena Gray, the writer of this article, has been associated with Coursework Club where she provided coursework writing service for more than a decade. At present, Elena leads a private venture offering Social Media Marketing to its worldwide clientele.

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2 comments

Vinnie 02 Feb 2018

Thank you for a great article, really helped me while preparing for an interview.

Alfeus 29 May 2018

Wow this are great points indeed.

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