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Scrum Master and Product Owner: Understanding the differences

 Agile methodology imparts the easy and convenient path to work. Scrum is one of the famous Agile methodologies. Agile methodologies consists of 4 main roles, viz. Product Owner, Scrum Master, Scrum team and Stakeholder. Each role has its share of responsibilities. These roles are all about commitment. Scrum master and the Product owner are two vital roles in the Scrum Software Development Methodology. Since they both are working on different areas of the project, they are indispensable for the project. Scrum Master is a mediator between the Product owner and the Development Team.   Product Owner vs Scrum Master- Though the Product Owner and the Scrum master vary in their roles, they complement each other. Scrum master should support the product Owner in every step possible. There should be an amicable relationship between the Product owner and the Scrum master. Disputes may happen between them if the roles are not clarified. Let us have a look at the differences in roles between the product owner and the scrum master. The Scrum Master concentrates on the project success, by assisting the product owner and the team in using the right process for creating a successful target and establishing the Agile principles.  Scrum Master Skills (SM): SM creates a friendly environment for the team for Agile development. SM improves the quality of the product. Certified Scrum Master Certification, adds advantage to become effective. SM protects his team from any kind of distraction and allows them to stay tuned. SM helps product owner to maximize ROI (return on investment) to meet the objectives. SM removes disputes between the product owner and the development team. SM encourages the team to meet the project deadline. SM acts like a coach for a team to perform better. A good Scrum Master should possess the skills like project management, engineering, designing, testing background and disciplines. SM provides continuous guidance to teams Duties of Scrum Master: SM facilitates team for better vision and always tries to improve the efficiency of the teams. SM manages Scrum processes in Agile methodology. SM removes impediments for the Scrum team. SM arranges daily quick stand-up meetings to ensure proper use of processes. SM helps product owner to prepare good product backlog and sets it for the next sprint. Conducting retrospective meetings. SM organizes and facilitates the sprint planning meeting. The Product Owner’s responsibility is to focus on the product success, to build a product which works better for the users and the customers and to create a product which meets business requirements. The product owner can interact with the users and customers, stakeholders, the development team and the scrum master. Product Owner Skills (PO): PO should have an idea about the business value of the product and the customers’ demands. Certified Scrum Product Owner Certification (CSPO) will be beneficial for the sales team. The development team consults PO, so he should always be available for them to implement the features correctly. PO should understand the program from the end-user point of view. Marketing is discussed on the sales level in most of the Organizations. So it is the PO’s duty to guide the marketing persons to achieve the goals successfully. PO is responsible for the product and the ways to flourish a business. PO has to focus for the proper production and ROI as well. PO should be able to solve the problems, completing trade-off analysis and making decisions about business deliverables. After CSPO course, PO can work with the project managers and the technical leads to prioritize the scope for product development. Sometimes PO and the Customers are same, sometimes Customers are thousands or millions of people. Duties of the Product Owner: PO has to attend the daily sprint planning meetings. PO prioritizes the product features, so the development team can clearly understand them. PO decides the deadlines for the project. PO determines the release date and contents. PO manages and creates the product backlog for implementation, which is nothing but the prioritized backlog of user stories. PO defines user stories to the development team. Spending some time to prioritize the user stories with few team members. One can enhance his/her knowledge in many directions and beyond boundaries, after undergoing the Certified Scrum Product Owner (CSPO) training.
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Scrum Master and Product Owner: Understanding the differences 572
Scrum Master and Product Owner: Understanding the differences

 Agile methodology imparts the easy and convenient path to work. Scrum is one of the famous Agile methodologies. Agile methodologies consists of 4 main roles, viz. Product Owner, Scrum Master, Scrum team and Stakeholder. Each role has its share of responsibilities. These roles are all about commitment.

Scrum master and the Product owner are two vital roles in the Scrum Software Development Methodology. Since they both are working on different areas of the project, they are indispensable for the project. Scrum Master is a mediator between the Product owner and the Development Team.

 

Product Owner vs Scrum Master-

Though the Product Owner and the Scrum master vary in their roles, they complement each other. Scrum master should support the product Owner in every step possible. There should be an amicable relationship between the Product owner and the Scrum master. Disputes may happen between them if the roles are not clarified. Let us have a look at the differences in roles between the product owner and the scrum master.

The Scrum Master concentrates on the project success, by assisting the product owner and the team in using the right process for creating a successful target and establishing the Agile principles. 

Scrum Master Skills (SM):

  • SM creates a friendly environment for the team for Agile development.
  • SM improves the quality of the product.
  • Certified Scrum Master Certification, adds advantage to become effective.
  • SM protects his team from any kind of distraction and allows them to stay tuned.
  • SM helps product owner to maximize ROI (return on investment) to meet the objectives.
  • SM removes disputes between the product owner and the development team.
  • SM encourages the team to meet the project deadline.
  • SM acts like a coach for a team to perform better.
  • A good Scrum Master should possess the skills like project management, engineering, designing, testing background and disciplines.
  • SM provides continuous guidance to teams

Duties of Scrum Master:

  • SM facilitates team for better vision and always tries to improve the efficiency of the teams.
  • SM manages Scrum processes in Agile methodology.
  • SM removes impediments for the Scrum team.
  • SM arranges daily quick stand-up meetings to ensure proper use of processes.
  • SM helps product owner to prepare good product backlog and sets it for the next sprint.
  • Conducting retrospective meetings.
  • SM organizes and facilitates the sprint planning meeting.

The Product Owner’s responsibility is to focus on the product success, to build a product which works better for the users and the customers and to create a product which meets business requirements. The product owner can interact with the users and customers, stakeholders, the development team and the scrum master.

Product Owner Skills (PO):

  • PO should have an idea about the business value of the product and the customers’ demands.
  • Certified Scrum Product Owner Certification (CSPO) will be beneficial for the sales team.
  • The development team consults PO, so he should always be available for them to implement the features correctly.
  • PO should understand the program from the end-user point of view.
  • Marketing is discussed on the sales level in most of the Organizations. So it is the PO’s duty to guide the marketing persons to achieve the goals successfully.
  • PO is responsible for the product and the ways to flourish a business.
  • PO has to focus for the proper production and ROI as well.
  • PO should be able to solve the problems, completing trade-off analysis and making decisions about business deliverables.
  • After CSPO course, PO can work with the project managers and the technical leads to prioritize the scope for product development.
  • Sometimes PO and the Customers are same, sometimes Customers are thousands or millions of people.

Duties of the Product Owner:

  • PO has to attend the daily sprint planning meetings.
  • PO prioritizes the product features, so the development team can clearly understand them.
  • PO decides the deadlines for the project.
  • PO determines the release date and contents.
  • PO manages and creates the product backlog for implementation, which is nothing but the prioritized backlog of user stories.
  • PO defines user stories to the development team.
  • Spending some time to prioritize the user stories with few team members.

One can enhance his/her knowledge in many directions and beyond boundaries, after undergoing the Certified Scrum Product Owner (CSPO) training.

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kritesh anand

Very nice Information is taught for scrum training. Above blog have nice information regarding product Owner.

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