Kickstart your career with best deals on top training courses NY10 Click to Copy

Search

Project Management Plan: Traditional Vs Agile

There are hundreds and thousands of projects being executed by the organizations in the world simultaneously. The projects span across construction sectors, industrial engineering, sports or government projects like constructing dams, bridges etc. The projects are undertaken to bring a value to the organizations and increase in ROI.The success and failures of projects are determined by the planning abilities of the organizations right from planning until a closure of the projects. By properly defining the goals, creating schedules with eyes on constraints and delivering per schedule will most likely steer the organizations towards success.Choosing between Agile & Traditional Project PlansWe will look at how project management plans can be useful (for both traditional and agile world) and have been delivering values to thousands of enterprises across the world. This will be useful in knowing the differences between Agile and Traditional Management plans and what methodology should you use for your project.Traditional Project Management Plan: -PMBOK defines project management plan is a set of baseline plans and subsidiary plans.1) Baselines for scope, schedule, and costThe scope will define the business requirements, deliverables, constraints, and WBS.The schedule will include timelines for activities and milestones.The cost will include budgets approved.2) Management plans for scope, schedule, cost, quality, resources, communications, risk, and procurementPlans for scope, schedule and cost will help the project manager to compare the actuals (during execution) of scope, schedule and cost towards the baseline documents and take corrective actionsThe quality management plan will include measurement and control approaches.HR management is to organize and lead the project team as well as other resources by defining the roles and responsibilities appropriately.Risk management plan will include methods can be used to identify and evaluate risks and outline mitigation and contingency plans.Procurement Plan is used to identify require red procurement and purchasing from third-party vendors.3) Requirement management planThe Requirements Management Plan is used to document the necessary information required to effectively manage project requirements from the definition, through traceability.4) Change management planChange management is a way of standardizing to efficiently manage all the changes with minimal impact on the product, processes, and organization.5) Configuration management planConfiguration Planning will identify which all project items are configurable (CIs), which all items need formal change control and what would be the process of controlling changes to these items.6) Process improvement planThe purpose of the process improvement plan is to document how the project team will analyze various processes, determine improvements and implement them.Project Management Plan is the most important plan that is used to get relevant buying from stakeholders. While PMI’s PMBOK defines the project management plans to be sets of plans as described above, the level of details and the formats used in management plans should be tailored to fit based on the environmental factors of the organization and needs of the project.Agile Project Management Plan: -                                                                     "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the face." - Mike Tyson                                                           Dwight D. Eisenhower rightly said, “Planning is essential, but plans are useless”If we cannot foresee everything this can happen during developing the project. Then, how could plans be effective?Agile project management is an approach based on delivering requirements iteratively and incrementally throughout the project life cycle. At the core of this, Agile is the requirement to exhibit central values and behaviors of trust, flexibility, empowerment, and collaboration where traditional plan-driven project management set detailed plans on all accounts and detailed requirements at the start of the project.Then, follow the plan and compare against actuals to take corrective actions. Agile starts work with some initial idea of what is required by a business called Minimum Viable Product (MVP) and by delivering those features in shorter cycles. These frequent iterative methods are central characteristics of the Agile project and because of this way of working, collaborative relationships are established between the Stakeholders and the team.There is a general misconception that Agile means less or no documentation. Agile requires just enough documentation for the team to understand and progress because the primary measure of the progress is always working software than exhaustive documentation. For e.g. If there is a project demand for documentation due to compliance and regulatory rules, then the documentation will be taken up during a sprint as user stories and will be completed.The Agile project management consists of three roles as defined by the Scrum. These roles are the Product Owner, Scrum Master, and the Team.1) Product Owner: - The Product Owner is responsible for the product vision and building the product right. A good product owner should prioritize requirements and is empowered to make decisions about the product.2) Scrum Master: - The Scrum Master serves as a servant leader, helping team members work together cohesively, removing impediments to progress, facilitating meetings and discussions. Also, the Scrum Master keeps the Scrum team focussed towards the defined project goal, and ensures that the team is strictly adhering to the Scrum practices.3) Team: - The Development team is one of the important roles in Agile project management. In Agile software development process, the team collaboratively decide who will work on which tasks, which engineering practices to be followed necessarily to achieve the project goals. Such teams are called the self-organized team in Agile.Unlike traditional project management, where the project teams depend entirely on the project manager, Agile project teams self-distribute those responsibilities. The product scope and schedule is the responsibility of the product owner, quality becomes shared ownership and other responsibilities are distributed to the team.ConclusionNow, we have seen the comparison between the Traditional and Agile Project Management Plans. Be it traditional or Waterfall, plans and planning are essential sets of components for any projects. This set of artifacts are like navigation systems to the project managers that can be used to track the project delivery against the laid out plans and take course corrections.There is no guarantee that projects will go according to the plans as there will always be uncertainties and risks that can disrupt the plans. Having a clear project management plan can reduce the risks greatly through mitigation plans and increase project success.
Rated 4.5/5 based on 1 customer reviews

Project Management Plan: Traditional Vs Agile

233
Project Management Plan: Traditional Vs Agile

There are hundreds and thousands of projects being executed by the organizations in the world simultaneously. The projects span across construction sectors, industrial engineering, sports or government projects like constructing dams, bridges etc. The projects are undertaken to bring a value to the organizations and increase in ROI.

The success and failures of projects are determined by the planning abilities of the organizations right from planning until a closure of the projects. By properly defining the goals, creating schedules with eyes on constraints and delivering per schedule will most likely steer the organizations towards success.

Choosing between Agile & Traditional Project Plans

We will look at how project management plans can be useful (for both traditional and agile world) and have been delivering values to thousands of enterprises across the world. This will be useful in knowing the differences between Agile and Traditional Management plans and what methodology should you use for your project.

Traditional Project Management Plan: -

PMBOK defines project management plan is a set of baseline plans and subsidiary plans.

1) Baselines for scope, schedule, and cost

  • The scope will define the business requirements, deliverables, constraints, and WBS.
  • The schedule will include timelines for activities and milestones.
  • The cost will include budgets approved.

2) Management plans for scope, schedule, cost, quality, resources, communications, risk, and procurement

  • Plans for scope, schedule and cost will help the project manager to compare the actuals (during execution) of scope, schedule and cost towards the baseline documents and take corrective actions
  • The quality management plan will include measurement and control approaches.
  • HR management is to organize and lead the project team as well as other resources by defining the roles and responsibilities appropriately.
  • Risk management plan will include methods can be used to identify and evaluate risks and outline mitigation and contingency plans.
  • Procurement Plan is used to identify require red procurement and purchasing from third-party vendors.

3) Requirement management plan

  • The Requirements Management Plan is used to document the necessary information required to effectively manage project requirements from the definition, through traceability.

4) Change management plan

  • Change management is a way of standardizing to efficiently manage all the changes with minimal impact on the product, processes, and organization.

5) Configuration management plan

  • Configuration Planning will identify which all project items are configurable (CIs), which all items need formal change control and what would be the process of controlling changes to these items.

6) Process improvement plan

  • The purpose of the process improvement plan is to document how the project team will analyze various processes, determine improvements and implement them.
    Project Management Plan is the most important plan that is used to get relevant buying from stakeholders. While PMI’s PMBOK defines the project management plans to be sets of plans as described above, the level of details and the formats used in management plans should be tailored to fit based on the environmental factors of the organization and needs of the project.

Agile Project Management Plan: -
 
                                                                    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the face." - Mike Tyson

                                                           Dwight D. Eisenhower rightly said, “Planning is essential, but plans are useless”

If we cannot foresee everything this can happen during developing the project. Then, how could plans be effective?

Agile project management is an approach based on delivering requirements iteratively and incrementally throughout the project life cycle. At the core of this, Agile is the requirement to exhibit central values and behaviors of trust, flexibility, empowerment, and collaboration where traditional plan-driven project management set detailed plans on all accounts and detailed requirements at the start of the project.

Then, follow the plan and compare against actuals to take corrective actions. Agile starts work with some initial idea of what is required by a business called Minimum Viable Product (MVP) and by delivering those features in shorter cycles. These frequent iterative methods are central characteristics of the Agile project and because of this way of working, collaborative relationships are established between the Stakeholders and the team.

There is a general misconception that Agile means less or no documentation. Agile requires just enough documentation for the team to understand and progress because the primary measure of the progress is always working software than exhaustive documentation. For e.g. If there is a project demand for documentation due to compliance and regulatory rules, then the documentation will be taken up during a sprint as user stories and will be completed.
The Agile project management consists of three roles as defined by the Scrum. These roles are the Product Owner, Scrum Master, and the Team.

1) Product Owner: - The Product Owner is responsible for the product vision and building the product right. A good product owner should prioritize requirements and is empowered to make decisions about the product.

2) Scrum Master: - The Scrum Master serves as a servant leader, helping team members work together cohesively, removing impediments to progress, facilitating meetings and discussions. Also, the Scrum Master keeps the Scrum team focussed towards the defined project goal, and ensures that the team is strictly adhering to the Scrum practices.

3) Team: - The Development team is one of the important roles in Agile project management. In Agile software development process, the team collaboratively decide who will work on which tasks, which engineering practices to be followed necessarily to achieve the project goals. Such teams are called the self-organized team in Agile.

Unlike traditional project management, where the project teams depend entirely on the project manager, Agile project teams self-distribute those responsibilities. The product scope and schedule is the responsibility of the product owner, quality becomes shared ownership and other responsibilities are distributed to the team.

Conclusion

Now, we have seen the comparison between the Traditional and Agile Project Management Plans. Be it traditional or Waterfall, plans and planning are essential sets of components for any projects. This set of artifacts are like navigation systems to the project managers that can be used to track the project delivery against the laid out plans and take course corrections.

There is no guarantee that projects will go according to the plans as there will always be uncertainties and risks that can disrupt the plans. Having a clear project management plan can reduce the risks greatly through mitigation plans and increase project success.

Ramkumar

Ramkumar Armugam

Blog Author

Ramkumar is an experienced Program Manager with 13+ years of success in leading all phases of diverse technology IT Projects in retail, e-commerce, insurance and pharma market research industries. He has more than 7+ years of experience in leading and executing projects and programs using agile and lean methodologies. He is currently working as Senior Manager in Cognizant Technology Solutions India Pvt Ltd and holds multiple certifications including PMP, PMI-ACP, CSM, CSPO, CSP and ICP-ACC. He has a zeal for project and program management and his current endeavor includes leading a large scale distributed product development team in delivering a world class product features in the area of Finance and HR domains for a large US retailer. He is a regular contributor to projectmanagement.com.

Join the Discussion

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Suggested Blogs

5 Benefits Of Program Management

If you are familiar with project management you have probably come across program management as well. A program is a collection of related projects, and sometimes business as usual work too, all aligned to a common objective. It’s a way of organizing related work into one common stream so that you can track and manage similar projects together. It’s really effective and it makes management’s life easier too! It’s virtually impossible to keep on top of 250 projects, but 30 programs? That’s a different story. Here are 5 more benefits of running a group of related projects as a program instead of as unconnected activities. 1. It’s Easier to Share Resources First, resources can be shared more effectively when a program structure is in place because the program manager can ensure individuals and the budget are deployed in areas that make the most difference. For example, the program manager may putt more resource on one project, to the detriment of another, if overall this will help the company achieve its goals more quickly. People working on the project that is slowed down will understand why that is happening and how it helps achieve the bigger picture. They’ll know that eventually their work will pick up again, and they might even be able to get involved in the project that needs extra hands right now. It’s the same with budget. When there is a need for one critical project to take a bit more of the funding pot, you can look across the program and see if there is any slack or contingency in other projects that would be more usefully deployed elsewhere. Also, when you’ve got one pool of resources it’s easier to share lessons learned between everyone, helping everyone up their game. 2. It’s Easier to Manage Conflict The second benefit is more to do with the interpersonal skills in the team. Conflict between individuals and entire projects can be more easily identified and managed within a program structure because there are clear lines of hierarchy and an overall structure for governance. This ensures someone is on hand to make decisions about project priorities (and prioritization is often the cause of conflict). The program manager can sort out conflict because that’s part of their job. If they can’t resolve it themselves, there is an onward escalation point in the portfolio manager or the program sponsor too. The very fact that there is someone looking at this can resolve some conflicts before they really take hold. 3. There’s More Visibility of Risk The third advantage to using a program management structure is that there is better visibility of risk. Risk management can be coordinated and managed in a structured way. This is even more so the case when you have a program office who can help maintain logs and action plans on behalf of the program manager. To give you an example of why visibility at program level is worth it, risk responses can be shared between projects, so it should cost less to put your mitigation and management plans in place. Project teams can work together so that they don’t duplicate work mitigating the same risk. Project teams can still identify risks as they do today, but they’ll escalate the relevant program-level ones to the program manager who can assess and track the overall risk profile for the entire program of work. Not sure why risk management is worth your time? Check out our guide to the importance of risk management. 4. It’s Easier to Manage Interdependencies Sometimes a project relies on another. For example, one project might deliver something that another project needs before it can start. These projects are often infrastructure-related or enabling projects but they are just as important as the projects that come afterwards. When one project depends on another project, you’ve got a project interdependency. A huge benefit of the program management structure is that they can be better managed when someone has the big picture. The program manager can ensure that projects start and finish at the optimum times and that outputs from one naturally feed into the start of others when they are required. Project managers will identify where their project leans on another and flag these to the program manager and the project office, if you have one. The dependencies can be logged, tracked and tasks put in place to ensure that the work happens as you expect so that teams aren’t sitting around waiting for someone else to finish their work before they can start. 5. You Can Choose The Best Projects Finally – and this isn’t last on the list because it is the least important – you can make sure that the best and most relevant projects can be chosen in a program and that they are all aligned to helping the organization meet its end goal. By picking and prioritizing the right and most cost-effective projects, you know that the teams’ efforts are being spent on what is going to really deliver the objectives. If a project is not going to help meet the overall program goals, then it’s easy enough to see this and take steps to do something about it, either by bringing it back on track, moving it into another program or closing it down. Program management is a skill, but it is one that brings a huge benefit to organizations that take the time to invest it in and set it up properly. Getting the structure right is a bit of a culture change but it’s not actually that hard to do if you spend a little time on it. Train up some of your experienced business change or project managers and start benefitting from a program management structure. They can learn more about how to successfully manage programs with the KnowledgeHut instructor-led PgMP® course
Rated 4.0/5 based on 20 customer reviews
1044
5 Benefits Of Program Management

If you are familiar with project management you ha... Read More

Importance and Benefits of The Project Charter

What is the Project Charter:PMBOK® Defines Project Charter as a document issued by the project initiator or sponsor that formally authorizes the existence of a project, and provides a project manager with the authority to apply organizational resources to the project.PMI® gives a lot of importance to project charter. Project Charter will state the high-level requirements to satisfy the stakeholders’ needs and it also defines the authority of the Project Manager.Business Case and Project statement of work are the documents that are necessary to create a project charter. The purpose of a business case is to understand the business need for the project and determine whether it is worth investing in. Business needs or demands include market demands, organizational need, customers’ requests, technological advance, legal requirements, ecological impacts, and social needs.“According to the PMBOK® Guide, the business case is an economic feasibility study. It is used to track progress and compare project results against the success factors identified in the business case”.A project isn’t a project until the project charter is approved, and the project charter cannot be started until the business case is approved.The Project Charter highlights high-level initiation draft defined as below:Let's look at why the project charter is so important!The main purpose of the project charter is the formal authorization of the project and the go-ahead to commit organizational resources to it; without a project charter, the project can be canceled anytime and for any reason and can be subject to an audit as an unauthorized project.Let us imagine a project without a project charter. If there is no project charter, projects will have no direction. The Project Managers will lack authority. There will be no expectations for the projects undertaken. The scope of the projects will not be clearly defined.Let's consider a project has started for 2-3 months. A Project Manager is already authorized, and the project is moving well. Due to certain circumstances, current Project Manager resigns from the company and the project is assigned to another Project Manager. The initial task of every Project Manager authorized should be to go through the Project Charter to understand its business need and objective. The Project Charter project describes goals, scope, stakeholders and a high-level deliverable at high levels. Imagine project having no project charter then Project Manager would have been like a “Fish Out of Water”.What is included in the Project Charter?A Charter is a document that elucidates the project in succinct wording without a lot of details. It’s written for high-level management needs. Charter doesn’t provide detailed end goals, schedule, and cost.A Project Charter template may include some or all the following:Components of the Project CharterDo We Really Require Project Charter?Project Charter is important for the success of a project. The Project charter builds a foundation for any projects undertaken. It is a great communication tool for the stakeholders and provides a direction to the project.Following are few of the benefits of a project charter:It gives an authority to the project manager to complete the projectExplains the business importance and existence of project.Demonstrates Management support for the project.Defines outcome for the project.Aligns project with the organization objectives.Provides a team with a clear concise reporting system.Protects team members from scope creep.Helps in avoiding disagreements between stakeholders.Authorizes the existence of the project or establishes the project.Defines the parameters within which the project manager is authorized to operate.Gives the project manager authority to spend money and procure resources.Provides the high-level requirements for the project.Links the project to the ongoing operations of the organization.Process of project charter:The project charter is an important document and a project should not be started without one. The success of the project cannot be measured without a project charter.A project charter is important in the Project Management, because-It ensures that the project manager understands the sponsor’s needs and requirements.It provides vital information needed to get the projects started.It acts as a reference document to make sure everyone (i.e. Project Manager, Stakeholder, Higher Management etc.) are on the same page.It authorizes and protects the project manager by describing what are the benefits of the Projects that need to be achieved.* Remember According to the PMBOK® Guide, a project benefit is the result of actions or behaviors, and/or the value of the product, service, or result from the project brings to the organization and the project stakeholders.
Rated 4.0/5 based on 5 customer reviews
Importance and Benefits of The Project Charter

What is the Project Charter:PMBOK® Defines Projec... Read More

Am I Eligible to Get PMP® Certified? - A Complete Checklist of PMP Exam Prerequisites

Doesn’t this question sound familiar? Your quest for PMP® certification begins with this question and it is also an important piece of information for every PMP® aspirant. The Project Management Professional (PMP)® is the most important certification for project managers across all industries. It is a truly global certification which allows you to lead projects almost in every country. Further, it enables you to work in any industry by deploying any methodology in any location.But before you begin your PMP® journey you need to meet certain education and experience requirements to meet the standards set by PMI in order to appear for your PMP® exam. The experience requirement shows your soft skills to sit for the PMP® exam and the educational requirements show that you have enough theoretical background to manage a project. However, your experience requirement for PMP® changes depending on the educational requirement which you satisfy. This blog will answer all your queries about the eligibility requirement for PMP® certification.The eligibility requirements for PMP®A salary survey conducted by the Project Management Institute (PMI) shows that PMP® certified project managers tend to earn more compared to their non-certified counterparts. PMP® certification warrants a certain level of knowledge on the project management area. The reason that companies and organisations give high credit to PMP® certification compared to other certificates in the industry because PMI has a very strict application and audit process for relevant education and experience requirements that one needs to be PMP® certified.As the employer has high regards for the certification, once you show a PMP® certification in your resume he or she will that you have met the strict PMP® certification requirements which proves a certain level of practice and knowledge on project management. It is not easy for someone to sit and pass the PMP® certification exam.If you are wondering about where can you check for these requirements then you will find all the criteria set by PMI for taking the PMP®  exam in the PMP® Credential Handbook. You can download the free version of this handbook from PMI’s website. It will help you to know everything about PMP® certification, who is eligible to apply, and how to go about applying. The eligibility requirements for taking the exam are as follows:You should hold a bachelor’s degree or the global equivalent with at least three years of project management experience. The three years of experience is expected to be comprised of 4,500 hours which you have spent directing and leading projects and 35 hours of project management education.In case, you don’t have a four-year degree, you need to have a secondary diploma (high school or global equivalent) with at least project management experience of 5 years. The five years of experience should comprise of 7,500 hours which you have spent directing and leading projects and project management education of around 5 hours.Need more clarity on the eligibility criteria? Then the following chart will surely help you to clarify your doubts.Eligibility RequirementFour-year degree or global equivalentSecondary degree or global equivalentYears of Project Management Experience3 Years (36 months)5 Years (60 months)Hours Leading & Directing Projects4,500 Hours7,500 HoursHours of Project Management Education35 Hours35 HoursMeet the 35 contact hours Project Management Education Requirement for PMP®You need to match one of the eligibility requirements which is required for you to appear for your PMP® certification exam. But it is also important for you to complete 35 hours of Project Management Education in order to fulfill the eligibility requirement to sit for the PMP® exam.You must be wondering about how can you earn the 35 hours of Project Management education requirement. You can enroll in a PMP® certification training to earn the same. These training also help you to prepare for your PMP® exam and get proper support from the experts to clear your PMP® exam at one shot.Acceptable experiences to be eligible for PMP® examThe experiences mentioned by you in your application should cover all the five processes as mentioned in the PMBOK® Guide. But you should keep in mind that it is not necessary for all of these processes to be in one single project. You can find a full list of acceptable tasks, knowledge, and skills in PMI’s PMP® Examination Content Outline. Few of the tasks that you might be performing and which would be acceptable are as follows:You should define the high-level scope of the project based on the requirements of business and compliance to meet the customer project expectations.Obtain approval to execute the project by presenting the project plan to the key stakeholders (if required).Achieve the project deliverables within the schedule and budget by executing the tasks as defined in the project plan.Get feedback from the stakeholders by communicating the project status to ensure that the business needs are aligned to the project aligns.Work with the customer and the sponsor to obtain final acceptance of the project deliverables to confirm that project deliverables and scope were met.Ways to gather the required experienceYou need to meet the PMP® experience requirement to be eligible in order to gain PMP® certification. But how can you gather enough experience? As discussed, you need to earn experience of 4,500 to 7,500 hours of directing and leading projects depending on your educational qualification.The following ideas can help you to overcome this obstacle:Full-time Project ManagersIf you are working as a Project Manager or in a similar position which gives you a full-time opportunity to lead and direct projects, then it’s easy. If you don’t have enough hours then you can go ahead with what you are doing and with time you will gather the required number of hours. If you are not a full-time Project ManagerDon’t have enough hours to meet the required experience eligibility? It even gets trickier when you are not in a role which gives you an opportunity to direct or lead projects. If you are not managing projects at all or managing projects part-time, you are collecting hours of experience at a slower rate compared to a full-time project manager. You can increase the rate in the following ways:By changing your roleYou can increase the amount of time spent on managing projects using the most effective solution, i.e. by changing your role. You can go for a wider discussion about your career development with your employer by stating clearly that you would like to provide more value to your employer by directing and leading projects.If you get an opportunity to become a full-time project manager then you are on your way to collect the required hours as soon as possible. By changing your companyIn case you are not getting an opportunity to shift to a different kind of responsibility in your current company then you should change the company you are working for. You might find a suitable opportunity to negotiate better terms and conditions than you are having in your current company. This will surely allow you to speed up the process of earning the required hours of experience in order to meet the PMI eligibility requirement.VolunteeringYou can always check for volunteering opportunity with your local PMI chapter which would also expose you to additional benefits. This will also provide you with more and better networking opportunities at the same time. You can earn the required experience hours through volunteering.Is PMI Membership Mandatory for me to get PMP®  certified?This is another question that you tend to ask while beginning your PMP® journey. You don’t have to be a PMI member in order to appear for your PMP® certification exam. But there are surely a few benefits which you can reap from your PMI membership. The benefits are as follows:As a PMI member, you can receive a significant discount on your PMP® exam application fee. Once you become a PMI member, you will realise that the cost of membership is comparatively lesser than the discounts which you get.You get access to a free PDF copy of the PMBOK Guide as a PMI member which is an important resource to prepare and pass your exam.Moreover, many local PMI chapters offer discounts on their PMP® exam preparation workshops to PMI members.PMP® certification costApart from the above-mentioned information about the eligibility requirements, there are certain costs related to PMP® exam. We can divide the cost of PMP® certification into the cost of PMP® certification training and the PMP® exam fee. But there is another hidden cost related to it which you should be aware of. This is the cost of the time which you will spend while studying for the PMP® certification exam. Let’s try to understand these costs in detail.Cost of 35 hours of Project Management TrainingYou are expected to meet certain eligibility criteria before appearing for the PMP Certification exam. Apart from other eligibilities, it is necessary for you to attend at least 35 hours of project management course. So, the major question which arises here is that how much do these certification courses cost?The cost of PMP® certification training varies based on the type of training which you are willing to take. Mostly, you need to make a choice between PMP® certification classroom training and online PMP® certification training. Also, the cost of your training depends on the country you are located. Usually, the cost of PMP® certification training ranges between $500 to $2,000.  The following chart will give you a clear idea about the cost of PMP® certification classroom training across other countries:CountriesPrice of classroom trainingAmerica, Canada, Australia$1,500South America (Brazil, Chile etc.)$600China, India$500European Countries$1,200Arabian Countries$2,000Exam Preparation TimeAs a busy professional, the time you spend for your project management education might cost you your precious leisure time. But you can save your time by opting for a self-paced online PMP certification training cost. For instance, you can plan to spend 5 to 6 hours a week to study in order to pass your PMP® exam. The duration of your training will certainly depend on your dedication, professional experiences, and your background in project management.  PMP®  Exam FeeOnce you are done with your 35 hours of project management education, you need to take your PMP® exam in a Prometric test center. You need to schedule your exam date in the nearest Prometric test center after PMI accepts your application. The PMP® certification exam fee can be brought down by becoming a PMI member.You can also get a free copy of PMBOK® by becoming a PMI member. Other than that, there are numerous other benefits which you can reap from your PMI membership.To sum up, the cost of PMP® certification depends on the course you decide to take. Your total PMP® certification cost will be nearly $750 if you choose to get your project management education through an online course. You can also continue preparing with a PMP® certification classroom training by spending around $1,700 including the exam fee.ConclusionThis blog will surely help you to understand the eligibility requirements to sit for your PMP® certification exam and the ways to attain them. This information will help you to prepare to begin your PMP® certification journey by fulfilling the required educational qualification and work experience. Further, the PMP® certification cost is a really essential piece of information when you plan to begin your PMP® certification journey.Earn the required experience hours by changing your role or volunteering with your local PMI chapter. Wish you all the best for your PMP® journey!
Rated 4.5/5 based on 18 customer reviews
7583
Am I Eligible to Get PMP® Certified? - A Complete...

Doesn’t this question sound familiar? Your quest... Read More