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How To Pass Leading SAFe® 4.5 Exam ?

Scaled Agile Framework is a roadmap that leads the organizations in implementing the Lean and Agile Practices. SAFe® includes the three foundational bodies of knowledge that are System Thinking, Lean Product Development, and Agile Software Development. It helps the organizations to improve themselves according to the business requirements, deals with challenges involved in developing and delivering ideal software and systems within a specified time. SAFe® practices are essential but, sometimes they can be complex and entail some challenges. It might be easy to deal with such challenges and move your enterprise towards SAFe® practices by becoming a professional SAFe® Agilist. Passing a SAFe® Agilist Certification exam proves that you are an expert in implementing Agile and improving the project you want to get involved in.Here, in this article, we will guide you through your Leading SAFe® 4.5 exam preparation.Firstly, the 2-day Leading SAFe® 4.5 training is the most crucial part of this certification. Join the course and ask all the doubts you have during the workshop without any hesitation. Make a note of all the important things which will be helpful for future references. After completing the course successfully, you should pass the exam to obtain SAFe® Agilist Certification.Exam DetailsFormat of the examThis is a web-based, timed, and closed book exam that will be conducted in English and delivered in the format of multiple choice questions. Upon completion of the Leading SAFe® training, candidates will get access to the exam within the SAFe® Community Platform. Candidates will have 90 minutes to finish the exam once it starts.The exam consists of 45 questions in total and you must answer a minimum of 34 questions correct out of 45. You can take the exam at any time and the fee for the first attempt will be included in the course registration fee only if the exam is taken within 30 days of course completion.Retake policy of the examIf the certification exam is not cleared in the first attempt, you can retake the exam again and again, but each retake costs $50.You can take the second attempt immediately after the first attemptYou need to wait for a minimum of 10 days to retake the exam for the third timeA minimum of 30-day wait is required to retake the exam fourth timeCandidates are not allowed to retake the exam, once they got a minimum passing score of 76% unless there are updates announced to the exam.Exam preparationThe exam is specifically designed to analyze the skills and knowledge of a particular candidate. Develop a study plan before going to take the exam.Here are a few important points you should remember-You should gain both practical and theoretical knowledge in order to pass the exam successfully.The course materials are more helpful to prepare for the exam and we at KnowledgeHut offer course materials authored by the Scaled Agile Academy. These materials can be used for referring the concepts that are presented during the training.Take the practice tests that are designed with the same level of difficulty, time duration, and the same number of questions. You can take the exam without any additional cost. The practice tests once completed, let’s you know the chapters you should study more in pink color. Study those topics again.  As a preparation, on scaledagileframework.com, on the big picture (framework) click on the words if have confusion/not sure and read the guidance article. It makes you prepare well for the main certification exam and boosts your confidence level.Choosing a right path takes you to important destinations in your career. Becoming a SAFe® 4.5 Agilist is a career path for many and it requires an excellent range of skills. The best institute guides you towards a bright career. So, choose the right and best institute that is authorized to do so and can help you reach your goals.
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How To Pass Leading SAFe® 4.5 Exam ?

447
How To Pass Leading SAFe® 4.5 Exam ?

Scaled Agile Framework is a roadmap that leads the organizations in implementing the Lean and Agile Practices. SAFe® includes the three foundational bodies of knowledge that are System Thinking, Lean Product Development, and Agile Software Development. It helps the organizations to improve themselves according to the business requirements, deals with challenges involved in developing and delivering ideal software and systems within a specified time. SAFe® practices are essential but, sometimes they can be complex and entail some challenges. It might be easy to deal with such challenges and move your enterprise towards SAFe® practices by becoming a professional SAFe® Agilist. Passing a SAFe® Agilist Certification exam proves that you are an expert in implementing Agile and improving the project you want to get involved in.

Here, in this article, we will guide you through your Leading SAFe® 4.5 exam preparation.

Firstly, the 2-day Leading SAFe® 4.5 training is the most crucial part of this certification. Join the course and ask all the doubts you have during the workshop without any hesitation. Make a note of all the important things which will be helpful for future references. After completing the course successfully, you should pass the exam to obtain SAFe® Agilist Certification.


Exam Details

Format of the exam

This is a web-based, timed, and closed book exam that will be conducted in English and delivered in the format of multiple choice questions. Upon completion of the Leading SAFe® training, candidates will get access to the exam within the SAFe® Community Platform. Candidates will have 90 minutes to finish the exam once it starts.

The exam consists of 45 questions in total and you must answer a minimum of 34 questions correct out of 45. You can take the exam at any time and the fee for the first attempt will be included in the course registration fee only if the exam is taken within 30 days of course completion.

Retake policy of the exam

If the certification exam is not cleared in the first attempt, you can retake the exam again and again, but each retake costs $50.

  • You can take the second attempt immediately after the first attempt
  • You need to wait for a minimum of 10 days to retake the exam for the third time
  • A minimum of 30-day wait is required to retake the exam fourth time

Candidates are not allowed to retake the exam, once they got a minimum passing score of 76% unless there are updates announced to the exam.

Exam preparation

SAFe 4.5 Exam Preparation

The exam is specifically designed to analyze the skills and knowledge of a particular candidate. Develop a study plan before going to take the exam.

Here are a few important points you should remember-

  • You should gain both practical and theoretical knowledge in order to pass the exam successfully.
  • The course materials are more helpful to prepare for the exam and we at KnowledgeHut offer course materials authored by the Scaled Agile Academy. These materials can be used for referring the concepts that are presented during the training.
  • Take the practice tests that are designed with the same level of difficulty, time duration, and the same number of questions. You can take the exam without any additional cost. The practice tests once completed, let’s you know the chapters you should study more in pink color. Study those topics again.  
  • As a preparation, on scaledagileframework.com, on the big picture (framework) click on the words if have confusion/not sure and read the guidance article. It makes you prepare well for the main certification exam and boosts your confidence level.

Choosing a right path takes you to important destinations in your career. Becoming a SAFe® 4.5 Agilist is a career path for many and it requires an excellent range of skills. The best institute guides you towards a bright career. So, choose the right and best institute that is authorized to do so and can help you reach your goals.

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