Search

DevOps Filter

Why Stop Inventing New DevOps Combinations?

DevOps - What's in a name?The term DevOps is well known by now. It was initially introduced by Patrick Dubois a Belgian IT consultant who organized an agile oriented event in October 2009 and named it DevOps Days, targeting not only developers but also systems administrators, managers, and toolsmiths from all over the world. After the conference, the conversations continued on Twitter with the hashtag #DevOps.If you want to know more about the origin of the DevOps, you can check the video given below which gives you a lot of background about the reason why Patrick Dubois initially started this DevOps Days conference:DevOps and the rise of the combinations and derivatives With the increasing popularity of DevOps, more people start to give their definition of DevOps. The different definitions of DevOps that go around can differ, depending on what aspect(s) of DevOps you want to focus.In a previous article, I wrote about how to explain DevOps in 5 letters - CALMS or CALMR i.e CALMS framework for DevOpsSome other definitions tend to focus primarily on the automation aspect, omitting the Agile foundation. As a consequence, you get the first combination of DevOps, named BizDevOps or BusDevOps. There are different interpretations about what BizDevOps actually means. “BizDevOps, also known as DevOps 2.0, is an approach to software development that encourages developers, operations staff and business teams to work together so the organization can develop software more quickly, be more responsive to user demand and ultimately maximize revenue.”At the same time, it is the most disputable definition. This definition assumes that DevOps is mainly a technology-driven initiative that hardly involves business people. But as mentioned in my previous article, the foundation of DevOps is culture, which goes back to the agile principles. And we all know that agile without business is only symptomatic. So DevOps without business is as symptomatic as agile without business.According to the Dzone article, DevOps is focusing on a single application or system whereas BizDevOps is focusing on the entire enterprise with all its complex processes and the mixture of applications and systems that support these complex processes.According to this article, BizDevOps provides an answer to dealing with:OK, fair point, but these aspects could as well be tackled by defining proper value streams and Agile Release Trains to deal with all the links and dependencies between these systems and applications. I don't see the need to come up with a different term.I guess you understand by now that I am not a big fan of the BizDevOps term and the confusion it creates. But it can get worse. It was some likely clever tool vendors that came up with the term DevSecOps. And if it is not the tool vendors that invented it, at least they were so clever to jump on the wagon to support the need for more security awareness in DevOps.Nowadays, large tool vendors using of the term DevSecOps instead of DevOps.Here's my opinion on this: security should be an integral part of DevOps. It should be a part of the culture:Don't only think about what something functionally should do, but also what can go wrong (think Abuse or Misuse cases). It is also a part of the automation. All security related tests should be automated as much as possible. Think about scanning vulnerabilities in your own source code, vulnerabilities in external libraries that you use, scanning your container images for vulnerabilities, or even - up to some extent - automated penetration testing. It is also a part of Lean principles: when a security test in your build pipeline fails (e.g. scanning your source code discovers a critical vulnerability), you stop the line.So again, the is no reason why the term DevSecOps should exist at all.Now that we have business and security covered, we can go on and see who else could feel denied or at least ignored? Maybe DBA's? Or any other person involved in data management? Maybe, that is the reason why we also have DevDataOps nowadays.I could go on for a while like this. But you get the point by now: it is uselessMaybe the DAD is right!I recently got to read an interesting article on disciplined agile delivery, the information portal from Mark Lines and Scott Ambler of their Disciplined Agile Delivery, or short DAD. DAD is not - as they call it - an agile methodology, but a process selection framework. DAD is the kernel of a layered model, like an onion, that they call Disciplined Agile and that consists of the following layers:Let’s explore each aspect in Disciplined Agile Framework mentioned in the diagram.1. Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD)Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) aspect consists of initial modeling and planning, forming the team, securing funding, continuous architecture, continuous testing, continuous development, and governance all the way through the lifecycle. The Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) framework supports multiple delivery life cycles, basic/Agile lifecycle based on Scrum, a lean lifecycle based on Kanban, and a modern Agile lifecycle for continuous delivery. This aspect is responsible for addressing all the aspects of solution delivery.2. Disciplined DevOpsDisciplined DevOps streamlines the IT solution development and IT operations activities, and supports organization-IT activities, to benefit more effective outcomes to the organizations.3. Disciplined Agile IT (DAIT)DAIT aspect helps to understand how to apply Agile and Lean strategies to IT organizations. This aspect comprises of all IT-level activities such as enterprise architecture, data management, portfolio management, IT governance, and other capabilities.4.Disciplined Agile Enterprise (DAE)DAE can predict and respond quickly to the changes in the marketplace by facilitating a change through an organizational culture and structure. This aspect can be applied to organizations having the learning mindset in the mainstream business and underlying lean and agile processes to drive innovation.The second one, Disciplined DevOps principles deal exactly with what I mentioned before: the different derivatives and combinations of DevOps. They start by giving an answer to the question of why it is so difficult to come to a common definition of DevOps:Specialized IT practitionersMany IT professionals still tend to specialize, choose a focus, like DBA, enterprise architect, operations engineer, or whatever. Each discipline will focus on its own aspect of DevOps.Agilists are focused on continuous deliveryBecause of their focus on releasing daily or even several times a day, a lot of discussions deal with bringing new features faster and more frequently to production and not paying attention to all aspects of DevOpsOperations professionals are often frustratedSystems administrators are crunched between the push of the development teams to deliver faster and more frequently and the typical stringent service management processes they have to deal with, that are not yet adapted to the need for more frequent changesTool vendors have limited offeringsA fool with a tool is still a fool… DevOps tool vendors only focus on these DevOps-aspects that their tools coverService vendors have limited offeringsSimilarly to tool vendors, service vendors will only focus on these DevOps aspects that their  services can currently coverTool vendors treat DevOps as a marketing buzzwordSurfing the waves of the hypes, vendors might be persuaded to rebrand their existing toolset to something DevOps-ish, because it sounds better in a sales pitch. Sounds like window dressing…The DevOps = Cloud visionApparently, some people think that implementing DevOps in your organization can only succeed if you move to a cloud-based platform. Although cloud-native development practices are a facilitator for implementing DevOps, it not a requirement. And moving to a cloud platform definitely isn’t a requirement.All these reasons make that person come up with DevOps combinations that give an answer to only part of the problem.Disciplined DevOps mentions the following visions:1. BizDevOpsBizDevOps is a basic DevOps vision that explicitly brings the customers into the picture. BizDevOps is also called BusDevOps. DevOps is not just for teams, but it can be potentially applicable to any team supporting an incremental delivery lifecycle. The BizDevOps workflow consists of Business Operations, activities of delivering of products and services to the organizations. BusDevOps seeks to streamline the entire value stream, not just the IT portion of it. Its workflow is depicted in the diagram below.2.   DevSecOpsAnother common improvement over the basic DevOps vision is something called DevSecOps. The aim behind this vision is to ensure data security by getting the various security issues, adopting the latest security practices, and finding out and addressing the highest priority security gaps [DevSecOps]. This vision includes collaborative security engineers, exploit testing, real-time security monitoring, and building “rugged software” that has built-in security controls. The workflow of DevSecOps is shown in the figure.  3. DevDataOpsThe aim behind DevDataOps is to maintain a balance between the current needs of data management consists of providing timely and accurate information to the organization and DevOps to respond to the marketplace. Supporting data management activities include the definition, support, and evolution of data and information standards and guidelines; the creation, support, evolution, and operation of data sources of record within your organization; and the creation, support, evolution, and operation of  data warehouse (DW)/business intelligence (BI) solutions. The following figure depicting the workflow of DevDataOps.Or should we just stick to the term DevOps?Even though the message of Scott Ambler and Mark Lines is perfectly reasonable, not everybody might the term Disciplined DevOps. It fits their framework like a glove: everything boils down to Disciplined. If you don’t want to be framed into the Disciplined Agile/DevOps framework (pun intended), you may as well stick to the term DevOps and make sure that you cover all the aspects, which include business, security, data, release management and support.

Why Stop Inventing New DevOps Combinations?

5135
Why Stop Inventing New DevOps Combinations?

DevOps - What's in a name?

The term DevOps is well known by now. It was initially introduced by Patrick Dubois a Belgian IT consultant who organized an agile oriented event in October 2009 and named it DevOps Days, targeting not only developers but also systems administrators, managers, and toolsmiths from all over the world. After the conference, the conversations continued on Twitter with the hashtag #DevOps.

If you want to know more about the origin of the DevOps, you can check the video given below which gives you a lot of background about the reason why Patrick Dubois initially started this DevOps Days conference:


DevOps and the rise of the combinations and derivatives 

With the increasing popularity of DevOps, more people start to give their definition of DevOps. The different definitions of DevOps that go around can differ, depending on what aspect(s) of DevOps you want to focus.

In a previous article, I wrote about how to explain DevOps in 5 letters - CALMS or CALMR i.e CALMS framework for DevOps
CALMS modelSome other definitions tend to focus primarily on the automation aspect, omitting the Agile foundation. As a consequence, you get the first combination of DevOps, named BizDevOps or BusDevOps. There are different interpretations about what BizDevOps actually means. 

“BizDevOps, also known as DevOps 2.0, is an approach to software development that encourages developers, operations staff and business teams to work together so the organization can develop software more quickly, be more responsive to user demand and ultimately maximize revenue.”

At the same time, it is the most disputable definition. This definition assumes that DevOps is mainly a technology-driven initiative that hardly involves business people. But as mentioned in my previous article, the foundation of DevOps is culture, which goes back to the agile principles. And we all know that agile without business is only symptomatic. So DevOps without business is as symptomatic as agile without business.

According to the Dzone article, DevOps is focusing on a single application or system whereas BizDevOps is focusing on the entire enterprise with all its complex processes and the mixture of applications and systems that support these complex processes.

According to this article, BizDevOps provides an answer to dealing with:

Devops
OK, fair point, but these aspects could as well be tackled by defining proper value streams and Agile Release Trains to deal with all the links and dependencies between these systems and applications. I don't see the need to come up with a different term.

I guess you understand by now that I am not a big fan of the BizDevOps term and the confusion it creates. But it can get worse. It was some likely clever tool vendors that came up with the term DevSecOps. And if it is not the tool vendors that invented it, at least they were so clever to jump on the wagon to support the need for more security awareness in DevOps.

Nowadays, large tool vendors using of the term DevSecOps instead of DevOps.

Here's my opinion on this: security should be an integral part of DevOps. It should be a part of the culture:

Don't only think about what something functionally should do, but also what can go wrong (think Abuse or Misuse cases). It is also a part of the automation. All security related tests should be automated as much as possible. Think about scanning vulnerabilities in your own source code, vulnerabilities in external libraries that you use, scanning your container images for vulnerabilities, or even - up to some extent - automated penetration testing. It is also a part of Lean principles: when a security test in your build pipeline fails (e.g. scanning your source code discovers a critical vulnerability), you stop the line.

So again, the is no reason why the term DevSecOps should exist at all.

Now that we have business and security covered, we can go on and see who else could feel denied or at least ignored? Maybe DBA's? Or any other person involved in data management? Maybe, that is the reason why we also have DevDataOps nowadays.

I could go on for a while like this. But you get the point by now: it is useless

Maybe the DAD is right!

I recently got to read an interesting article on disciplined agile delivery, the information portal from Mark Lines and Scott Ambler of their Disciplined Agile Delivery, or short DAD. DAD is not - as they call it - an agile methodology, but a process selection framework. DAD is the kernel of a layered model, like an onion, that they call Disciplined Agile and that consists of the following layers:
Disciplined Agile
Let’s explore each aspect in Disciplined Agile Framework mentioned in the diagram.

1. Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD)

Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) aspect consists of initial modeling and planning, forming the team, securing funding, continuous architecture, continuous testing, continuous development, and governance all the way through the lifecycle. The Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) framework supports multiple delivery life cycles, basic/Agile lifecycle based on Scrum, a lean lifecycle based on Kanban, and a modern Agile lifecycle for continuous delivery. This aspect is responsible for addressing all the aspects of solution delivery.

2. Disciplined DevOps

Disciplined DevOps streamlines the IT solution development and IT operations activities, and supports organization-IT activities, to benefit more effective outcomes to the organizations.

3. Disciplined Agile IT (DAIT)

DAIT aspect helps to understand how to apply Agile and Lean strategies to IT organizations. This aspect comprises of all IT-level activities such as enterprise architecture, data management, portfolio management, IT governance, and other capabilities.

4.Disciplined Agile Enterprise (DAE)

DAE can predict and respond quickly to the changes in the marketplace by facilitating a change through an organizational culture and structure. This aspect can be applied to organizations having the learning mindset in the mainstream business and underlying lean and agile processes to drive innovation.

The second one, Disciplined DevOps principles deal exactly with what I mentioned before: the different derivatives and combinations of DevOps. They start by giving an answer to the question of why it is so difficult to come to a common definition of DevOps:

Specialized IT practitioners
Many IT professionals still tend to specialize, choose a focus, like DBA, enterprise architect, operations engineer, or whatever. Each discipline will focus on its own aspect of DevOps.

Agilists are focused on continuous delivery
Because of their focus on releasing daily or even several times a day, a lot of discussions deal with bringing new features faster and more frequently to production and not paying attention to all aspects of DevOps

Operations professionals are often frustrated
Systems administrators are crunched between the push of the development teams to deliver faster and more frequently and the typical stringent service management processes they have to deal with, that are not yet adapted to the need for more frequent changes

Tool vendors have limited offerings
A fool with a tool is still a fool… DevOps tool vendors only focus on these DevOps-aspects that their tools cover

Service vendors have limited offerings
Similarly to tool vendors, service vendors will only focus on these DevOps aspects that their  services can currently cover

Tool vendors treat DevOps as a marketing buzzword
Surfing the waves of the hypes, vendors might be persuaded to rebrand their existing toolset to something DevOps-ish, because it sounds better in a sales pitch. Sounds like window dressing…

The DevOps = Cloud vision

Apparently, some people think that implementing DevOps in your organization can only succeed if you move to a cloud-based platform. Although cloud-native development practices are a facilitator for implementing DevOps, it not a requirement. And moving to a cloud platform definitely isn’t a requirement.
All these reasons make that person come up with DevOps combinations that give an answer to only part of the problem.

Disciplined DevOps mentions the following visions:

1. BizDevOps

BizDevOps is a basic DevOps vision that explicitly brings the customers into the picture. BizDevOps is also called BusDevOps. DevOps is not just for teams, but it can be potentially applicable to any team supporting an incremental delivery lifecycle. The BizDevOps workflow consists of Business Operations, activities of delivering of products and services to the organizations. BusDevOps seeks to streamline the entire value stream, not just the IT portion of it. Its workflow is depicted in the diagram below.

BizDevOps


2.   DevSecOps

Another common improvement over the basic DevOps vision is something called DevSecOps. The aim behind this vision is to ensure data security by getting the various security issues, adopting the latest security practices, and finding out and addressing the highest priority security gaps [DevSecOps]. This vision includes collaborative security engineers, exploit testing, real-time security monitoring, and building “rugged software” that has built-in security controls. The workflow of DevSecOps is shown in the figure.  

DevSecOps
3. DevDataOps

The aim behind DevDataOps is to maintain a balance between the current needs of data management consists of providing timely and accurate information to the organization and DevOps to respond to the marketplace. Supporting data management activities include the definition, support, and evolution of data and information standards and guidelines; the creation, support, evolution, and operation of data sources of record within your organization; and the creation, support, evolution, and operation of  data warehouse (DW)/business intelligence (BI) solutions. The following figure depicting the workflow of DevDataOps.

 DevDataOps

Or should we just stick to the term DevOps?

Even though the message of Scott Ambler and Mark Lines is perfectly reasonable, not everybody might the term Disciplined DevOps. It fits their framework like a glove: everything boils down to Disciplined. 

If you don’t want to be framed into the Disciplined Agile/DevOps framework (pun intended), you may as well stick to the term DevOps and make sure that you cover all the aspects, which include business, security, data, release management and support.

Koen

Koen Vastmans

Blog Author

I am an IT professional working in a major Belgian bank for over 26 years. I have been into software development for several years, mostly in Java, from COTS software integration over web applications to digital signing. The past 6 years I was an agile coach and trainer. I recently joined a team of cloud native development, to focus on DevOps processes and organisation.

My passion for agile and DevOps is my main driver to share my ideas about these topics.

Join the Discussion

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Suggested Blogs

How to Install Docker on Ubuntu

Docker is a platform that packages the application and all its dependencies in the container so that the application works seamlessly. The Container makes the application run its resource in an isolated process similar to the virtual machines, but it is more portable. For a detailed introduction to the different components of a Docker container, you can check out Introduction to Docker, Docker Containers & Docker Hub This tutorial covers the installation and use of Docker Community Edition (CE) on an Ubuntu 20.04 machine. Pre-requisitesAudienceThis tutorial is meant for those who are interested in learning Docker as a container service System Requirements Ubuntu 20.04 64-bit operating system. (If Linux OS is not in system, we can run docker using Virtual Box, PFB the steps) A user account with sudo privileges An account on Docker Hub to pull or push an image from Hub. Ubuntu Installation on Oracle Virtual Box If you want to use Ubuntu 20.04 without making any change to the Windows Operating system, you can proceed with the Oracle Virtual box.  Virtual Box is free and open-source virtualization software from Oracle. It enables you to install other operating systems in virtual machines. It is recommended that the system should have at least 4GB of RAM to get decent performances from the virtual operating system. Below are the steps for downloading Ubuntu 20.04 on Oracle Virtual box:Navigate to the website of Oracle Virtual Box, download the .exe file and get the latest stable version. 1. Once done with downloading the virtual box, we can navigate to and download the  Ubuntu disk image (.iso file) by clicking on the download option 2. Once the download has been completed for Ubuntu .iso file, open the virtual box and click on "New" present on top.  3. Enter the details of your virtual machine by giving any name, type as "Linux " and Version as Ubuntu (64 bit)  4. Choose the memory (RAM ) that needs to be allocated to the Virtual machine  and click on Next. (I have chosen 3000 MB) 5. After the RAM allocation ,Click on  Create a virtual disk now. This serves as the hard disk of the virtual Linux system. It is where the virtual system will store its files 6. Now, we want to select the Virtual Hard Disk.  7. We can choose either the “Dynamically allocated” or the “Fixed size” option for creating the virtual hard disk. 8. Finally, we have  to specify our Ubuntu OS's size. The recommended size is 10 GB, but it  can be increased if required.8. Finally, we have  to specify our Ubuntu OS's size. The recommended size is 10 GB, but it  can be increased if required.9. Ubuntu OS is ready to install in Virtual Box, but before starting the Virtual system, we need to a make few changes in settings. Click on storage under the setting.  10. Click on Empty under Controller IDE. Navigate to Attributes and browse the Optical Drive option. 11. Choose the .iso file from the location where it is downloaded. Once selected, click on OK and start the Virtual box by clicking on start present on the Top menu.12. Click ok and start the machine. 13. Proceed with "Install Ubuntu" 14. Under "Updates and other software" section, check "Normal installation", and the two options under “Other options” and continue.15. In Installation type, check Erase disk and install Ubuntu.16. Choose your current location and set up your profile. Click Continue.  17. It may take 10-15 minutes to complete the installation 18. Once the installation finishes, restart the virtual systemWe are done with pre-request, and can now proceed with using this Ubuntu. Docker Installation Process on Ubuntu  Method 1: Install Docker on Ubuntu Using Default Repositories One of the easiest ways is the installation of Docker from the standard Ubuntu 20.04 repositories, but It’s possible that the Ubuntu default repositories have not updated to the latest revision of Docker. It happens because in some cases Docker is not supporting that particular Ubuntu version. Therefore, there can be a scenario where  Ubuntu default repositories have not updated to the latest version. Log in to Virtual Box. Run “docker” as command to check if it is previously installed.To install Docker on Ubuntu box, first update the packages. It will ask for a password. Enter it and allow the system to complete the updates.sudo apt updateTo install Docker from Ubuntu default repositories, use the below command: sudo apt install docker.io To check the installed version, use the below: docker --version Since discussed above, it has installed the 19.03.8 version of docker whereas the latest version is 20.04  Method 2: Install Docker from Official Repository For installing docker on ubuntu 20.04 with the latest version, we’ll proceed with enabling the Docker repository, importing the repository GPG key, and finally installing the package. To install the docker on Ubuntu box, update your existing list of packages. It will ask for a password. Enter it and allow the system to complete the updates. sudo apt update  We need to install a few prerequisite packages to add HTTPS repository : sudo apt install apt-transport-https ca-certificates curl software-properties-common Import the repository’s GPG key using the following curl command: curl -fsSL https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu/gpg | sudo apt-key add - Add the Docker APT repository to the system sudo add-apt-repository "deb [arch=amd64] https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu $(lsb_release -cs) stable"Again, update the package database with the Docker packages sudo apt update Finally, install Docker using below command: sudo apt install docker-ce To check the installed version use below: docker --versionTo start, enable and check the status of docker, use below command: sudo systemctl  status docker  sudo systemctl  start  docker  sudo systemctl  enable  docker To check system wide information regarding docker installation, we use the command “docker info”. Information that is shown includes the kernel version, number of containers and unique images. The output will contain details as given below, depending upon the daemon running: Source:$ docker info  Client:   Context:    default   Debug Mode: true  Server:   Containers: 14    Running: 3    Paused: 1    Stopped: 10   Images: 52   Server Version: 1.13.0   Storage Driver: overlay2    Backing Filesystem: extfs    Supports d_type: true    Native Overlay Diff: false   Logging Driver: json-file   Cgroup Driver: cgroupfs   Plugins:    Volume: local    Network: bridge host macvlan null overlay   Swarm: active    NodeID: rdjq45w1op418waxlairloqbm    Is Manager: true    ClusterID: te8kdyw33n36fqiz74bfjeixd    Managers: 1    Nodes: 2    Orchestration:     Task History Retention Limit: 5    Raft:     Snapshot Interval: 10000     Number of Old Snapshots to Retain: 0     Heartbeat Tick: 1     Election Tick: 3    Dispatcher:     Heartbeat Period: 5 seconds    CA Configuration:     Expiry Duration: 3 months    Root Rotation In Progress: false    Node Address: 172.16.66.128 172.16.66.129    Manager Addresses:     172.16.66.128:2477   Runtimes: runc   Default Runtime: runc   Init Binary: docker-init   containerd version: 8517738ba4b82aff5662c97ca4627e7e4d03b531   runc version: ac031b5bf1cc92239461125f4c1ffb760522bbf2   init version: N/A (expected: v0.13.0)   Security Options:    apparmor    seccomp     Profile: default   Kernel Version: 4.4.0-31-generic   Operating System: Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS   OSType: linux   Architecture: x86_64   CPUs: 2   Total Memory: 1.937 GiB   Name: ubuntu   ID: H52R:7ZR6:EIIA:76JG:ORIY:BVKF:GSFU:HNPG:B5MK:APSC:SZ3Q:N326   Docker Root Dir: /var/lib/docker   Debug Mode: true    File Descriptors: 30    Goroutines: 123    System Time: 2016-11-12T17:24:37.955404361-08:00    EventsListeners: 0   Http Proxy: http://test:test@proxy.example.com:8080   Https Proxy: https://test:test@proxy.example.com:8080   No Proxy: localhost,127.0.0.1,docker-registry.somecorporation.com   Registry: https://index.docker.io/v1/   WARNING: No swap limit support   Labels:    storage=ssd    staging=true   Experimental: false   Insecure Registries:    127.0.0.0/8   Registry Mirrors:     http://192.168.1.2/     http://registry-mirror.example.com:5000/   Live Restore Enabled: false Note: In case you get below error after running “docker info” command, one way is to add sudo in front and run the command, OR you can refer to the same error-resolving steps mentioned under Running Docker Images section. Running Docker Images and Verifying the process: To check whether you can access and download the images from Docker Hub, run the following command: sudo docker run hello-worldIn case of errors received after running the docker run command, you can correct it using the following steps, otherwise proceed with the next step of checking the image. ERROR: docker: Got permission denied while trying to connect to the Docker daemon socket at unix:///var/run/docker.sock: Post http://%2Fvar%2Frun%2Fdocker.sock/v1.35/containers/create: dial unix /var/run/docker.sock: connect: permission denied. See 'docker run --help'.   Create the docker group if it does not exist sudo groupadd docker Add your user to the docker group.   sudo usermod -aG docker $USER   Eg:- sudo usermod -aG docker kanav Run the following command or Logout and login again and run ( if that doesn't work you may need to reboot your machine first)  newgrp docker Check if docker can be run without root docker run hello-world If the problem still continues, try to reboot it and run the command. To check the image, use this command: sudo docker images Uninstall Procedure: Below are the common commands used to remove images and containers: sudo  apt-get  purge docker-ce docker-ce-cli containerd.io To completely uninstall Docker, use below: To identify what are the installed packages, this is the command: dpkg -l | grep -i dockersudo apt-get purge -y docker-engine docker docker.io docker-ce docker-ce-cli  sudo apt-get autoremove -y --purge docker-engine docker docker.io docker-ce   To remove images, containers, volumes, or user created configuration files, these commands can be used: sudo rm -rf /var/lib/docker /etc/docker sudo rm /etc/apparmor.d/docker sudo groupdel docker sudo rm -rf /var/run/docker.sock  Conclusion: If you found this Install Docker on Ubuntu blog relevant and useful, do check out the Docker-Training workshop from KnowledgeHut, where you can get equipped with all the basic and advanced concepts of Docker! 
5490
How to Install Docker on Ubuntu

Docker is a platform that packages the application... Read More

How to Install Kubernetes on Windows

Kubernetes is a container-based platform for managing cloud resources and developing scalable apps. It is widely regarded as the most common platform for automating, deploying, and scaling the entire cloud infrastructure. The platform runs on all major operating systems and is the most widely used open-source cloud tool.  Kubernetes can scale your entire infrastructure, monitor each service's health, act as a load balancer, and automate deployments, among other things. You can deploy your pods (docker containers) and services across the cloud by installing and configuring as many nodes (clusters) as you want.Let’s get started. We will guide you through the complete roadmap on how to install Kubernetes for Windows users. This tutorial will show you how to set up Kubernetes and deploy the official web GUI dashboard, which will allow you to manage and monitor everything. PrerequisitesFor installing Kubernetes in your system, here are a few prerequisites that need special attention. The hardware and software requirements are discussed below:Hardware requirementsMaster node with at least 2 GB memory. (Additional will be great)Worker node with 700 MB memory capacity.Your Mouse/Keyboard (monitor navigation)Software requirementsHype-VDocker DesktopUnique MAC addressUnique product UUID for every nodeEnsuring that there is a full range of connectivity between all the machines in the cluster is a must.Installation ProcedureStep 1: Install & Setup Hyper-VAs we all know, Windows has its virtualization software, known as Hyper-V, which is essentially VirtualBox on steroids. Hyper-V allows you to manage your virtual machines (VMs) using either the free Microsoft GUI tool or the command line. It's simple to enable Hyper-V, but first, make sure your PC meets the following requirements:Your operating system should be Windows 10 (Enterprise, Pro, or Education), withAt least 4GB of RAM and CPU Virtualization support, though you should double-check that it's turned on in your BIOS settings.You can disable or enable features like Hyper-V that may not be pre-installed when Windows is installed. Always keep in mind that some of the features require internet access to download additional Windows Update components.To enable Hyper-V on your machine, follow the steps below:1. Open the Control Panel.2. Select Programs from the left panel.3. Next, go to Programs and Features, then Turn Windows Features On or Off.4. Examine Hyper-V and the Hypervisor Platform for Windows.5. Select OK.Your system will now begin installing Hyper-V in the background; it may be necessary to reboot a few times until everything is properly configured. Don't hold your breath for a notification or anything! Verify that Hyper-V is installed successfully on your machine by running the following command as Administrator in PowerShell:Get-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Hyper-VOnce the state is shown as Enabled for above command in Power shell, we are good to go.Step 2: Download Docker for Windows and install it.Kubernetes is a container orchestration system built on top of Docker. It is essentially just a tool for communicating with Docker containers and managing everything at an enterprise level. Simply go to install Docker and click to Get Docker Desktop for Windows (stable).Windows users can use Docker Desktop.Docker Desktop for Windows is a version of Docker optimized for Windows 10. It's a native Windows application that makes developing, shipping, and running dockerized apps simple. Docker Desktop for Windows is the fastest and most reliable way to develop Docker apps on Windows, as it uses Windows-native Hyper-V virtualization and networking. Docker Desktop for Windows can run Docker containers on both Linux and Windows.Installation of Docker DesktopLet us take a look on the different steps involved in installing docker desktop.Double-click Docker for Windows Installer to run the installer.Docker starts automatically once the installation is complete. Docker is running and accessible from a terminal, as indicated by the whale in the notification area.Run Try out some Docker commands in a command-line terminal like PowerShell!  Run the Docker version to check the version.Run Docker run hello-world to verify that Docker can pull and run images.Boom!As long as the Docker Desktop for Windows app is running, Docker is accessible from any terminal. The Docker whale in the taskbar has a setting button that can be accessed from the UI.For a detailed step by step installation guide with screenshot, visit the blog - How to Install Docker on Windows, Mac, & Linux: A Step-By-Step GuideWARNING: FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS BELOW! If Docker was successfully installed but you can't find its tray icon, you'll need to restart your computer. Check the official troubleshooting guide here if the issue persists. Step 3: Install Kubernetes on Windows 10Docker includes a graphical user interface (GUI) tool that allows you to change some settings or install and enable Kubernetes.To install Kubernetes, simply follow the on-screen instructions on the screen:1. Right-click the Docker tray icon and select Properties.2. Select "Settings" from the drop-down menu.3. Select "Kubernetes" from the left panel.4. Check Enable Kubernetes and click "Apply"Docker will install additional packages and dependencies during the installation process. It may take between 5 and 10 minutes to install, depending on your Internet speed and PC performance. Wait until the message 'Installation complete!' appears on the screen. The Docker app can be used after Kubernetes has been installed to ensure that everything is working properly. Both icons at the bottom left will turn green if both services (Docker and Kubernetes) are running successfully and without errors.Example.Step 4: Install Kubernetes DashboardThe official web-based UI for managing Kubernetes resources is Kubernetes Dashboard. It isn't set up by default. Kubernetes applications can be easily deployed using the cli tool kubectl, which allows you to interact with your cloud and manage your Pods, Nodes, and Clusters. You can easily create or update Kubernetes resources by passing the apply argument followed by your YAML configuration file.Use the following commands to deploy and enable the Kubernetes Dashboard.1. Get the yaml configuration file from here.2. Use this to deploy it. kubectl apply -f .\recommended.yaml3. Run the following command to see if it's up and running.:kubectl.exe get -f .\recommended.yaml.txtStep 5: Access the dashboardThe dashboard can be accessed with tokens in two ways: the first is by using the default token created during Kubernetes installation, and the second (more secure) method is by creating users, giving them permissions, and then receiving the generated token. We'll go with the first option for the sake of simplicity.1. Run the following command PowerShell (not cmd)((kubectl -n kube-system describe secret default | Select-String "token:") -split " +")[1]2. Copy the generated token3. Runkubectl proxy.4. Open the following link on your browser: http://localhost:8001/api/v1/namespaces/kubernetes-dashboard/services/https:kubernetes-dashboard:/proxy/5. SelectToken & paste the generated token6. Sign InFinallyYou'll be able to see the dashboard and your cloud resources if everything is set up correctly. You can then do almost all of the "hard" work without having to deal with the CLI every time. You may occasionally get your hands dirty with the command line, but if you don't understand Docker and Kubernetes or don't have the time to manage your own cloud, it's better to stick with some PaaS providers that can be quite expensive.Kubernetes Uninstallation ProcessThe procedures for uninstalling cert-manager on Kubernetes are outlined below. Depending on which method you used to install cert-manager - static manifests or helm - you have two options.Warning: To uninstall cert-maneger, follow the same steps as you did to install it, but in reverse. Whether cert-manager was installed from static manifests or helm, deviating from the following process can result in issues and potentially broken states. To avoid this, make sure you follow the steps outlined below when uninstalling.Step 1: Before continuing, make sure that all user-created cert-manager resources have been deleted. You can check for any existing resources with the following command:$ kubectl get Issuers,ClusterIssuers,Certificates,CertificateRequests,Orders,Challenges --all-namespacesAfter you've deleted all of these resources, you can uninstall cert-manager by following the steps outlined in the installation guide.Step 2: Using regular manifests to uninstall.Uninstalling from a regular manifest installation is as simple as reversing the installation process and using the delete command.kubectl.2. Delete the installation manifests using a link to your currently running version vX.Y. Z like so:$ kubectl delete -f https://github.com/jetstack/cert-manager/releases/download/vX.Y.Z/cert-manager.yamlStep 3: Uninstalling with Helm.1. Uninstalling cert-manager from a Helm installation is as simple as reversing the installation process and using the delete command on both the server and the client. kubectl and helm.$ helm --namespace cert-manager delete cert-manager2. Next, delete the cert-manager namespace:$ kubectl delete namespace cert-manager3. Finally, delete the cert-manger  CustomResourceDefinitions using the link to the version vX.Y.Z you installed:$ kubectl delete -f https://github.com/jetstack/cert-manager/releases/download/vX.Y.Z/cert-manager.crds.yamlThe namespace is in the process of being terminated.The namespace may become stuck in a terminating state if it is marked for deletion without first deleting the cert-manager installation. This is usually because the APIService resource is still present, but the webhook is no longer active and thus no longer reachable.4. To fix this, make sure you ran the above commands correctly, and if you're still having problems, run:$ kubectl delete apiservice v1beta1.ConclusionIn this tutorial, we have explained in detail how to install Kubernetes with Hyper-V. Also, we have tackled what requirements we need, both in terms of the software and hardware. We have explained how to install Hyper-V and Docker on Windows 10.   It is important to note that the fundamental difference between Kubernetes and Docker is that Kubernetes is meant to run across a cluster and Docker is meant to run through nodes.   Kubernetes is also more extensive than Docker Swarm and is meant to coordinate a cluster of nodes at scale in production in an efficient manner. Each software is crucial to having a smooth installation process.   We finally looked at how to install and uninstall Kubernetes.
1700
How to Install Kubernetes on Windows

Kubernetes is a container-based platform for manag... Read More

How To Install Jenkins on Ubuntu

Jenkins is a Java-built open-source Continuous Integration (CI) and CD platform. Basically, Jenkins builds software projects, checks and deploys them. This is one of the most practical programming tools you can master, and today we will show you how Jenkins is installed on Ubuntu 18.04. Use this powerful tool to activate your VPS server!Jenkins is loved by teams of all sizes, for different language projects like Java, Ruby, Dot Net, PHP etc. Jenkins is a platform that is autonomous, and can be used on Windows, Linux or any other operating system.  Prerequisites Hardware Requirements: RAM- 4 GB (Recommended) Storage- more than 50 GB of Hard Disk Space (Recommended)        Software Requirements: Java: Java Development Kit (JDK) or Java Runtime Environment (JRE).  Web Browser: Any browser such as Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Microsoft Edge. Operating System: An Ubuntu 18.04 server installed with a non-root sudo user and firewall. For help in the planning of production capability of a Jenkins installation see Choosing the right hardware for Masters. Why Use Jenkins? You need to consider continuous integration (CI) and continuous delivery (CD) to understand Jenkins: Continuous integration – the practice of continuous production combined with the main industry.  Continuous delivery – the code is constantly delivered to an area after the code is ready for delivery. It could be for production or staging. The commodity is supplied to a consumer base that can provide QA or inspection by customers. Developers update the code regularly in the shared repository (such as GitHub or TFS). Improvements made in the source code are made at the end of the day, making it difficult to identify the errors. So, Jenkins is used here. Once a developer changes the repository, Jenkins will automatically enable the build and immediately warn you in the event of an error (Continuous Integration CI). Installation Procedure: Step 1: Install Java Skip to the next section if you have Java already installed on your system. To check, please run the following command in the terminal: java --version Jenkins needs Java for running, but it doesn't include certain distributions by default, and Java versions of Jenkins are incompatible. Multiple Java implementations are available to you. OpenJDK is currently the most popular one, which we will use in this guide. Being an open-source Java application, Jenkins requires the installation of OpenJDK 8 on your system. The apt repositories can directly access OpenJDK 8. The installation of OpenJDK from standard repositories is recommended. Open and enter the following in the terminal window: $ sudo apt update  $ sudo apt install openjdk-8-jdk The download and installation will be requested. Press the "Y" button and press the Enter button to finish the process. Java 8 will be installed on your system. We are ready to download Jenkins package now as we have our requirements ready! Step 2: Install Jenkins The default Ubuntu packages for Jenkins are always behind the current version of the project itself. You may use the project-maintained packages to install Jenkins to take advantage of the newest patches and features. 1. add the framework repository key: $ wget -q -O - https://pkg.jenkins.io/debian-stable/jenkins.io.key | sudo apt-key add  The device returns OK when the key is inserted. 2. Next, link the repository of Debian packages to the sources.list of the server: $ sudo sh -c 'echo deb http://pkg.jenkins.io/debian-stable binary/ > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/jenkins.list' 3. When both are in place, upgrade to apt to use the new repository: $ sudo apt update 4. Install Jenkins: $ sudo apt install jenkins Now we're going to start the Jenkins server, as Jenkins and its dependencies are in place. Step 3: Start Jenkins 1. You can start Jenkins using systemctl: $ sudo systemctl start jenkins 2. As systemctl does not display performance, you can use the status command to check that Jenkins has successfully launched: $ sudo systemctl status jenkinsIf all went well, the start of the performance should demonstrate that the service is active and ready to boot: Output: jenkins.service - LSB: Start Jenkins at boot time     Loaded: loaded (/etc/init.d/jenkins; generated)     Active: active (exited) since Sat 2021-04-17 00:34:17 IST; 26s ago       Docs: man:systemd-sysv-generator(8)    Process: 17609 ExecStart=/etc/init.d/jenkins start (code=exited, status=0/SUCC As Jenkins is running, so adjust the firewall rules to complete our further setup of Jenkins from the web browser. Step 4: Opening the Firewall 1. Jenkins works by default on port 8080, so let's open the port with ufw: $ sudo ufw allow 8080  2. Check ufw’s status: $ sudo ufw status You will see that traffic from anywhere is permitted to port 8080. Output: Status: active  To                         Action      From  --                         ------      ----  8000                       ALLOW       Anywhere                    CUPS                       ALLOW       Anywhere                    27017                      ALLOW       Anywhere                    27017                      ALLOW       192.168.1.10                8080                       ALLOW       Anywhere                    8000 (v6)                  ALLOW       Anywhere (v6)               CUPS (v6)                  ALLOW       Anywhere (v6)               27017 (v6)                 ALLOW       Anywhere (v6)               8080 (v6)                  ALLOW       Anywhere (v6) 3. If the firewall is inactive, the following commands will allow OpenSSH and turn it back on: $ sudo ufw allow OpenSSH  $ sudo ufw enable We can finish the initial configuration with Jenkins installed and our firewall configured. Note: If you decide to continue to use Jenkins, use a Nginx Reverse Proxy at Ubuntu 18.04 to configure Jenkins with SSL when your exploration has been completed to protect your passwords and any sensitive system or product information sent between the machine and the server in plain text. Step 5: Setting Up Jenkins 1. To set up installation, visit Jenkins on its default 8080 port with your server domain name or IP address: http://your_server_ip_or_domain:8080 You should see the Unlock Jenkins screen, which displays the initial password's location:2. You can use the cat command to display the password: $ sudo cat /var/lib/jenkins/secrets/initialAdminPassword 3. Copy the alphanumeric terminal 32-character password and paste into the Administrator Password field, then click Continue. Output: 0aaaf00d9afe48e5b7f2a494d1881326 The following screen shows the ability to install or select certain plugins: 4. We will click on the option to install proposed plugins to start the installation process immediately. 5. When the installation is done, the first administrative user will be prompted. You can save this step and use your initial password to continue as an Admin. However, we will take some time to create the user. The Jenkins default server is NOT encrypted to prevent data from being protected. Use the Nginx Reverse Proxy on Ubuntu 18.04 to configure Jenkins with SSL. This protects the information of users and builds transmitted through the web interface. 6. You will see a configuration instance page, which asks you to confirm your Jenkins instance's URL of choice. Confirm either your server's domain name or the IP address of your server.  7. Click Save and Finish once you have confirmed the relevant information. A confirmation page will show you that "Jenkins is ready!"  Hit Start using Jenkins button and it will take you to the Jenkins dashboard.  Congratulations! You have completed the installation of Jenkins. Step 6: Creation of New Build Jobs in Jenkins: The freestyle job is a highly versatile and user-friendly choice. It's easy to set up and many of its options appear in many other build jobs. For all projects, you can use it. Follow the following steps: You have to login to your Jenkins Dashboard by visiting2) Create New item: Click on the New Item on the left-hand side of the dashboard.3) Fill the project description: You can enter the job details as per your need.4) Source Code Management: Under source code management, enter the repository URL.You can also use a Local repository. 5) Build Environment: Now in the Build section, Click on the “Add build Setup” Select "Execute Windows batch command".Now, add the java commands. In this article, we have used javac HelloWorld.java and java HelloWorld.   6) Save the project: Click Apply and save the project. 7) Build Source Code and check its status: Click on “Build Now” on the left-hand side of the screen to create the source code. 8) Console Output: Select the build number and click on “Console Output” to check the status of the build run. When it shows success, it means that we have successfully run the HelloWorld program from the cGitHub Repository. In case of failure, you can check the job logs by clicking on failure icon and debug the root cause.Uninstall Jenkins Follow the instructions to uninstall Jenkins: $ sudo apt-get remove jenkins Uninstall Jenkins: $ sudo apt-get remove --auto-remove jenkins Purging your data: $ sudo apt-get purge jenkins or you can use: $ sudo apt-get purge --auto-remove jenkins Conclusion: Installing Jenkins on Ubuntu is really that easy. Jenkins has a low learning curve and so you can start to work with it as quickly as possible. In the above article we have learned how to install Jenkins in an Ubuntu machine where all the steps are explained clearly. In case you want to learn more about the core concepts of Jenkins Jobs, Pipelines, Distributed System, Plugins, and how to use Jenkins in depth you can enroll for our course Jenkins Certification Course. 
5465
How To Install Jenkins on Ubuntu

Jenkins is a Java-built open-source Continuous In... Read More

Useful links