Search

The PMP® Exam Blueprint For 2019

Preparing for your PMP® exam might seem like a struggle, but the end result is quite rewarding. From the initial application process, you need to go through a lengthy procedure to become a PMP® certified professional. The PMP® exam tests the professionals on the five project management processes: Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing.  It is also important for the candidates to have a thorough understanding of the nine knowledge areas under project management, which includes integration management, project scope management, time management, project resource management plan, procurement management, cost management, and time management.The PMP® certification is a validation of a professional’s experience in project management and is offered by the Project Management Institute (PMI) to those candidates who qualify the PMP® examination.The process of preparation can be quite challenging for a candidate who is preparing for a PMP® certification. This article discusses the details of the PMP® exam, giving an insight into the prerequisites, layout of the exam and some tips on how to ace the exam the first time.PMP® Examination FormatThe PMP® examination contains a total of 200 multiple-choice questions. Out of these 200 questions, 25 questions are ‘unscored questions’, that is, they do not affect the exam score. These questions act as an effective and admissible way to test the validity of future examination questions. The questions are placed and are asked randomly throughout the examination. It is very important to keep in mind that the unscored questions cannot be distinguished from the scored questions. Hence it is important that all the questions are answered with the same level of precision.No. of Scored QuestionsNo. of Unscored QuestionsTotal number of Questions17525200The standard method of PMI  examination is Center-based Testing (CBT). While paper-based Testing is also available, but only under limited circumstances.The allotted time duration for completion of the exam is 4 hours. There aren’t any scheduled breaks during the examination, though a small break can be taken if needed. If any break is taken during the exam, the exam clock time does not stop but continues to count down.Before you begin taking the exam, you will be shown a tutorial explaining the process of the exam. It’s recommended to go through this video that takes around 15 minutes. Further, your PMP® exam will be followed by a survey. The time for both excludes the four hours of the examination during which you need to answer 200 questions.Allotted time for the Examination4 hoursNew PBT Policy effective from 1 July 2017The Paper-based testing for the PMP® examination is available under limited circumstances. The instances are listed as follows:Distance to a Prometric CBT (Centre-based testing)  site exceeds 240 km (150 miles)A Prometric CBT site isn’t available in the country of residence and travelling across borders is prohibited/burdensome.As of 01 July 2017, the price for PBT exam has been changed, which now equals the CBT prices.NOTE: It should be indicated during the certification payment process if the candidate will be opting for a centre-based or a paper-based examination. In the case of PBT examination, the site location, date and group testing number on the application should be included as well.How are the PMP® examination questions developed?The questions which are asked in the PMP® examination are:Developed in accordance with the standards of  IOC/IEC 17024Developed and are validated independently by global work groups of PMP® certification holders.Monitored via psychometric analysisAccording to the specifications made in the PMP® Examination Content Outline.Referenced to the present project management titles, which include but not limited to PMI ’s global standards.Are any language aids provided for the PMP® examination?PMI  examinations are administered in English. However, for the questions and answers of the PMP® examinations, language aids are provided with no additional costs.Language Aids are available in 14 languages, which are stated as follows:ArabicHebrewBrazilian PortugueseItalianChinese (Simplified)Chinese (Traditional)JapaneseKoreanFrenchRussianGermanSpanishPolishTurkishThe language aids are provided when the examination is being administered. They are protected under the PMI  Test Security and Confidentiality rules.NOTE: If a language aid is required, it should be indicated as a part of the payment process, that is, while submitting the application online; or as a part of the application process, if a paper application is being submitted.The post-exam survey and pre-exam tutorial are administered only in the English language. The language aid is provided only for the PMP® examination questions and answers.What is the Blueprint of the PMP® Examination?The PMP® examination blueprint, which is depicted in the table below defines the proportion of questions which are asked from each domain. These percentages determine the number of questions that will appear in the examination, covering all the domains and process groups of the project management. The following is the blueprint:Blueprint of the PMP® ExamDomainPercentage of QuestionsInitiation13%Planning24%Execution31%Monitoring and Controlling25%Closing7%TOTAL100%Further, let’s discuss the domains, tasks, knowledge and skill statements which are defined by the Role Delineation Study. There are multiple tasks under each domain which are measured through the process of PMP® certification.Domain I, Initiating - 13%Task 1: Carry out a project assessment based on the available information, meetings with stakeholders, and the lessons which are learned from the previous projects.Task 2: Figure out the key deliverables to direct the achievement of project goals and manage customer expectations based on the business requirements.Task 3: Use appropriate tools and techniques to perform stakeholder analysis so that expectations can be aligned and support can be gained for the project.Task 4: Recognise high-level risks, constraints, and assumptions based on the historical data, current environment, organisational factors, and expert judgement, so that an implementation strategy can be proposed.Task 5: Engage in the process of development of project charter by compiling and analyzing the gathered information so that it is ensured that the project stakeholders agree on its elements.Task 6: Acquire the project charter approval from the sponsor, so that the authority assigned to the project manager can be assigned, while at the same time commitment and acceptance can be gained.Task 7: Perform benefit analysis with relevant stakeholders so that the project alignment with organizational strategy can be validated.Task 8: Ensure that there is a common understanding of the key deliverables, milestones, as well as their roles and responsibilities by informing the stakeholders of the approved project charter.Knowledge and SkillsAnalytical skillsBenefit analysis techniquesElements of a project charterEstimation tools and techniquesStrategic managementDomain II, Planning - 24%Task 1: Based on the project charter and lessons learned, review and assess the project requirements, constraints and assumptions with the stakeholders.Task 2: Based on the approved project scope and using scope management techniques, develop scope management so that the scope of the project can be defined, maintained and managed.Task 3: Based on the project scope, resources, schedule, approved project charter, and other information, plan the cost management using estimating techniques so that the project costs can be managed.Task 4: Based on the approved project deliverables and milestones, scope, and resource management plans, develop the project schedule so that a scheduled completion of the project can be managed.Task 5: Come up with a Project Resource Management plan where the roles and responsibilities of the project team members can be defined so that a project organizational structure can be created and guidance can be formed regarding how resources will be managed and assigned.Task 6: Work on a communication management plan which will be based on the project organizational structure and stakeholder requirements, so that the flow of project information can be defined and managed.Task 7: Based on the project scope, budget, and schedule, create a procurement management plan. This ensures that the required project resources will be available.Task 8: To prevent the occurrence of defects while at the same time control the cost of quality, come up with a quality management plan to define the quality standards for the project and its products which will be based on the project scope, risks, and requirements.Task 9: Work on change management so that the changes can be managed and tracked.Task 10: Develop a risk management plan. Identify, analyse and prioritize the project risk; create a risk register, and define risk response strategy to do so. This way, the uncertainty and opportunity throughout the project life cycle can be managed.Task 11: Present the project management plan to the relevant stakeholders in accordance with the applicable policies and procedures, so the approval to proceed with the project execution can be attained.Task 12: Conduct kick-off meeting, communicate the start of the project, and other relevant information to engage stakeholders and gain commitment.Task 13: Develop a stakeholder management plan after analyzing the needs and potential impact so that the stakeholders’ expectations can be managed and can be engaged in project decisions.Knowledge and SkillsChange management planningCommunications planningEstimation tools and techniquesLean and efficiency principlesQuality management planningRegulatory and environmental impacts assessment planningScope deconstruction (e.g., WBS, Scope backlog) tools and techniquesStakeholder management planningWorkflow diagramming techniquesCost management planning, including project budgeting tools and techniquesContract types and selection criteriaHuman resource planningProcurement planningRequirements gathering techniquesRisk management planningScope management planningTime management planning, including scheduling tools and techniquesDOMAIN III, Executing - 31%Task 1: Follow the human resource and procurement management plans by obtaining and managing the project resources so that the project requirements can be met.Task 2: Lean and develop the project team to manage the task execution based on the project management plan so that the project deliverables can be achieved.Task 3: Use appropriate tools and techniques to implement a quality management plan. This is done to ensure that the work is being performed as per the required quality standards.Task 4: Follow the change management plan to implement the approved changes and corrective actions so that the project requirements can be met.Task 5: Follow the risk management plan to implement the approved actions so that the impact of risks can be minimized while at the same time, the advantage of opportunities on the project can be attained. ‘Task 6: Follow the communication plan and manage the flow of information so that the stakeholders are kept engaged and informed.Task 7: Follow the stakeholder management plan to maintain the stakeholder relationship so that continued support can be received and expectations can be managed.Knowledge and SkillsContinuous improvement processesElements of a statement of workProject budgeting tools and techniquesVendor management techniquesContract management techniquesInterdependencies among project elementsQuality standard toolsDomain IV, Monitoring and Controlling - 25%Task 1: Use appropriate tools and techniques to measure the project performance so that any variance and corrective actions can be identified and quantified.Task 2: Follow the change in the management plan and manage changes to the project so that the project goal remains aligned with the business needs.Task 3: Use appropriate tools and techniques to meet project requirements and business needs in order to verify that the project deliverables conform to the quality standards which has been established in the quality management plan.Task 4: Monitor and assess the risk to determine if exposure has changed and evaluated the effectiveness of response strategies so that the impact of risks and opportunities on the project can be managed.Task 5: Review and update the issue log as well as determine corrective measures by using appropriate tools and techniques so that the impact on the project can be minimized.Task 6: Use lessons learned management techniques to capture, analyze, and manage the lessons learned so that continuous improvement can be attained.Task 7: According to the procurement plan, monitor the procurement activities so that the compliance with project activities can be verified.Knowledge and SkillsPerformance measurement and tracking techniquesProject control limitsProject monitoring tools and techniquesQuality measurement toolsRisk response techniquesProcess analysis techniquesProject finance principlesProject quality best practices and standardsRisk identification and analysis techniquesQuality validation and verification techniquesDomain V, Closing - 7%Task I: Collect the final acceptance of the project deliverables from the relevant stakeholders as confirmation that the project scope and deliverables were achieved.Task II: According to the project plan, transfer the ownership of deliverables to the assigned stakeholders so that the project closure can be facilitated.Task III: Obtain financial, legal and administrative closure via the accepted practices and policies so that a formal closure of the project can be attained and a transfer of liability can be ensured.Task IV: According to the communications management plan, prepare and share the final project report so that the project performance can be documented and conveyed as well as project evaluation can be assisted.Task V: Collect and combine the lessons that were learned throughout the project and conduct a project review so that the organization’s knowledge base can be updated.Task VI: Archive the materials and project documents by making use of the generally accepted practices so that statutory requirements can be complied with and for potential use in future projects and audits.Task VII: Use appropriate tools and techniques to get feedback from relevant stakeholders so that their satisfaction can be evaluated.Knowledge and SkillsArchiving practices and statutesContract closure requirementsFeedback techniquesProject review techniquesActive listeningBenefits realizationBusiness acumenCoaching, mentoring, training, and motivational techniquesConfiguration managementCustomer satisfaction metricsDecision makingDiversity and cultural sensitivityExpert judgment techniqueGenerational sensitivity and diversityInterpersonal skillsLeadership tools, techniques, and skillsMeeting management techniquesOrganizational and operational awarenessPresentation tools and techniquesProblem-solving tools and techniquesQuality assurance and control techniquesRisk assessment techniquesStakeholder management techniquesVirtual/remote team managementCompliance (statute/organization)Close-out proceduresPerformance measurement techniquesTransition planning techniqueApplicable laws and regulationsBrainstorming techniquesChange management techniquesCommunication channels, tools, techniques, and methodsConflict resolutionData gathering techniquesDelegation techniquesEmotional intelligenceFacilitationInformation management tools, techniques, and methodsKnowledge managementLessons learned management techniquesNegotiating and influencing techniques and skillsPeer-review processesPrioritization/time managementProject finance principlesRelationship managementSituational awarenessTeam-building techniquesTips for passing and preparing for PMP® ExamPMP® exam requires a lot of dedication and efforts in order to clear it at one go. The following tips will surely help you to prepare and pass your PMP® exam:Memorise all formulas to easily answer the math questions.Spend around 4 hours to practice full sample exams at one sitting.On the day of your exam, use your time effectively to answer 200 questions within 4 hours. You will have 1 minute to answer each question.Answer all questions, do not leave any question blank.Use the process of elimination for obviously incorrect answer options to maximise probability in case you are not sure about the correct answer.Avoid spending too much time on any single question. If you are spending more than 2 minutes on a single question then you can make your best guess for the answer and mark it for review at the end of the exam.Try to reserve the last 10 minutes to review the marked questions.Read all the answer options before selecting an answer.Keep in mind that some questions may provide hints to other questions in the exam.Wear comfortable cloth and footwear on the day of your exam.To wrap it up!The PMP® certification acts as a validation of a professional’s experience in project management and is a challenging process as well. Start preparing well for the five domains (Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing) in advance so that you can ace the examination and get nearer to achieving your dream career. All the best!

The PMP® Exam Blueprint For 2019

10115
The PMP® Exam Blueprint For 2019

Preparing for your PMP® exam might seem like a struggle, but the end result is quite rewarding. From the initial application process, you need to go through a lengthy procedure to become a PMP® certified professional. The PMP® exam tests the professionals on the five project management processes: Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing.  It is also important for the candidates to have a thorough understanding of the nine knowledge areas under project management, which includes integration management, project scope management, time management, project resource management plan, procurement management, cost management, and time management.

The PMP® certification is a validation of a professional’s experience in project management and is offered by the Project Management Institute (PMI) to those candidates who qualify the PMP® examination.

The process of preparation can be quite challenging for a candidate who is preparing for a PMP® certification. This article discusses the details of the PMP® exam, giving an insight into the prerequisites, layout of the exam and some tips on how to ace the exam the first time.

PMP® Examination FormatPMP® Examination Format

The PMP® examination contains a total of 200 multiple-choice questions. Out of these 200 questions, 25 questions are ‘unscored questions’, that is, they do not affect the exam score. These questions act as an effective and admissible way to test the validity of future examination questions. The questions are placed and are asked randomly throughout the examination. It is very important to keep in mind that the unscored questions cannot be distinguished from the scored questions. Hence it is important that all the questions are answered with the same level of precision.

No. of Scored Questions
No. of Unscored QuestionsTotal number of Questions
175
25200

The standard method of PMI  examination is Center-based Testing (CBT). While paper-based Testing is also available, but only under limited circumstances.The allotted time duration for completion of the exam is 4 hours. There aren’t any scheduled breaks during the examination, though a small break can be taken if needed. If any break is taken during the exam, the exam clock time does not stop but continues to count down.

Before you begin taking the exam, you will be shown a tutorial explaining the process of the exam. It’s recommended to go through this video that takes around 15 minutes. Further, your PMP® exam will be followed by a survey. The time for both excludes the four hours of the examination during which you need to answer 200 questions.

Allotted time for the Examination
4 hours

New PBT Policy effective from 1 July 2017

The Paper-based testing for the PMP® examination is available under limited circumstances. The instances are listed as follows:

  • Distance to a Prometric CBT (Centre-based testing)  site exceeds 240 km (150 miles)
  • A Prometric CBT site isn’t available in the country of residence and travelling across borders is prohibited/burdensome.

As of 01 July 2017, the price for PBT exam has been changed, which now equals the CBT prices.

NOTE: It should be indicated during the certification payment process if the candidate will be opting for a centre-based or a paper-based examination. In the case of PBT examination, the site location, date and group testing number on the application should be included as well.

How are the PMP® examination questions developed?

The questions which are asked in the PMP® examination are:

  • Developed in accordance with the standards of  IOC/IEC 17024
  • Developed and are validated independently by global work groups of PMP® certification holders.
  • Monitored via psychometric analysis
  • According to the specifications made in the PMP® Examination Content Outline.
  • Referenced to the present project management titles, which include but not limited to PMI ’s global standards.

Are any language aids provided for the PMP® examination?

PMI  examinations are administered in English. However, for the questions and answers of the PMP® examinations, language aids are provided with no additional costs.

Language Aids are available in 14 languages, which are stated as follows:

  • Arabic
  • Hebrew
  • Brazilian Portuguese
  • Italian
  • Chinese (Simplified)
  • Chinese (Traditional)
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • French
  • Russian
  • German
  • Spanish
  • Polish
  • Turkish

The language aids are provided when the examination is being administered. They are protected under the PMI  Test Security and Confidentiality rules.

NOTE: If a language aid is required, it should be indicated as a part of the payment process, that is, while submitting the application online; or as a part of the application process, if a paper application is being submitted.

The post-exam survey and pre-exam tutorial are administered only in the English language. The language aid is provided only for the PMP® examination questions and answers.

What is the Blueprint of the PMP® Examination?

Blueprint of the PMP® Examination

The PMP® examination blueprint, which is depicted in the table below defines the proportion of questions which are asked from each domain. These percentages determine the number of questions that will appear in the examination, covering all the domains and process groups of the project management. The following is the blueprint:

Blueprint of the PMP® Exam
DomainPercentage of Questions
Initiation
13%
Planning
24%
Execution
31%
Monitoring and Controlling
25%
Closing
7%
TOTAL
100%

Further, let’s discuss the domains, tasks, knowledge and skill statements which are defined by the Role Delineation Study. There are multiple tasks under each domain which are measured through the process of PMP® certification.

Domain I, Initiating - 13%

Task 1: Carry out a project assessment based on the available information, meetings with stakeholders, and the lessons which are learned from the previous projects.

Task 2: Figure out the key deliverables to direct the achievement of project goals and manage customer expectations based on the business requirements.

Task 3: Use appropriate tools and techniques to perform stakeholder analysis so that expectations can be aligned and support can be gained for the project.

Task 4: Recognise high-level risks, constraints, and assumptions based on the historical data, current environment, organisational factors, and expert judgement, so that an implementation strategy can be proposed.

Task 5: Engage in the process of development of project charter by compiling and analyzing the gathered information so that it is ensured that the project stakeholders agree on its elements.

Task 6: Acquire the project charter approval from the sponsor, so that the authority assigned to the project manager can be assigned, while at the same time commitment and acceptance can be gained.

Task 7: Perform benefit analysis with relevant stakeholders so that the project alignment with organizational strategy can be validated.

Task 8: Ensure that there is a common understanding of the key deliverables, milestones, as well as their roles and responsibilities by informing the stakeholders of the approved project charter.

Knowledge and Skills

  • Analytical skills
  • Benefit analysis techniques
  • Elements of a project charter
  • Estimation tools and techniques
  • Strategic management

Domain II, Planning - 24%

Task 1: Based on the project charter and lessons learned, review and assess the project requirements, constraints and assumptions with the stakeholders.

Task 2: Based on the approved project scope and using scope management techniques, develop scope management so that the scope of the project can be defined, maintained and managed.

Task 3: Based on the project scope, resources, schedule, approved project charter, and other information, plan the cost management using estimating techniques so that the project costs can be managed.

Task 4: Based on the approved project deliverables and milestones, scope, and resource management plans, develop the project schedule so that a scheduled completion of the project can be managed.

Task 5: Come up with a Project Resource Management plan where the roles and responsibilities of the project team members can be defined so that a project organizational structure can be created and guidance can be formed regarding how resources will be managed and assigned.

Task 6: Work on a communication management plan which will be based on the project organizational structure and stakeholder requirements, so that the flow of project information can be defined and managed.

Task 7: Based on the project scope, budget, and schedule, create a procurement management plan. This ensures that the required project resources will be available.

Task 8: To prevent the occurrence of defects while at the same time control the cost of quality, come up with a quality management plan to define the quality standards for the project and its products which will be based on the project scope, risks, and requirements.

Task 9: Work on change management so that the changes can be managed and tracked.

Task 10: Develop a risk management plan. Identify, analyse and prioritize the project risk; create a risk register, and define risk response strategy to do so. This way, the uncertainty and opportunity throughout the project life cycle can be managed.

Task 11: Present the project management plan to the relevant stakeholders in accordance with the applicable policies and procedures, so the approval to proceed with the project execution can be attained.

Task 12: Conduct kick-off meeting, communicate the start of the project, and other relevant information to engage stakeholders and gain commitment.

Task 13: Develop a stakeholder management plan after analyzing the needs and potential impact so that the stakeholders’ expectations can be managed and can be engaged in project decisions.

Knowledge and Skills

  • Change management planning
  • Communications planning
  • Estimation tools and techniques
  • Lean and efficiency principles
  • Quality management planning
  • Regulatory and environmental impacts assessment planning
  • Scope deconstruction (e.g., WBS, Scope backlog) tools and techniques
  • Stakeholder management planning
  • Workflow diagramming techniques
  • Cost management planning, including project budgeting tools and techniques
  • Contract types and selection criteria
  • Human resource planning
  • Procurement planning
  • Requirements gathering techniques
  • Risk management planning
  • Scope management planning
  • Time management planning, including scheduling tools and techniques

DOMAIN III, Executing - 31%

Task 1: Follow the human resource and procurement management plans by obtaining and managing the project resources so that the project requirements can be met.

Task 2: Lean and develop the project team to manage the task execution based on the project management plan so that the project deliverables can be achieved.

Task 3: Use appropriate tools and techniques to implement a quality management plan. This is done to ensure that the work is being performed as per the required quality standards.

Task 4: Follow the change management plan to implement the approved changes and corrective actions so that the project requirements can be met.

Task 5: Follow the risk management plan to implement the approved actions so that the impact of risks can be minimized while at the same time, the advantage of opportunities on the project can be attained. ‘

Task 6: Follow the communication plan and manage the flow of information so that the stakeholders are kept engaged and informed.

Task 7: Follow the stakeholder management plan to maintain the stakeholder relationship so that continued support can be received and expectations can be managed.

Knowledge and Skills

  • Continuous improvement processes
  • Elements of a statement of work
  • Project budgeting tools and techniques
  • Vendor management techniques
  • Contract management techniques
  • Interdependencies among project elements
  • Quality standard tools

Domain IV, Monitoring and Controlling - 25%

Task 1: Use appropriate tools and techniques to measure the project performance so that any variance and corrective actions can be identified and quantified.

Task 2: Follow the change in the management plan and manage changes to the project so that the project goal remains aligned with the business needs.

Task 3: Use appropriate tools and techniques to meet project requirements and business needs in order to verify that the project deliverables conform to the quality standards which has been established in the quality management plan.

Task 4: Monitor and assess the risk to determine if exposure has changed and evaluated the effectiveness of response strategies so that the impact of risks and opportunities on the project can be managed.

Task 5: Review and update the issue log as well as determine corrective measures by using appropriate tools and techniques so that the impact on the project can be minimized.

Task 6: Use lessons learned management techniques to capture, analyze, and manage the lessons learned so that continuous improvement can be attained.

Task 7: According to the procurement plan, monitor the procurement activities so that the compliance with project activities can be verified.

Knowledge and Skills

  • Performance measurement and tracking techniques
  • Project control limits
  • Project monitoring tools and techniques
  • Quality measurement tools
  • Risk response techniques
  • Process analysis techniques
  • Project finance principles
  • Project quality best practices and standards
  • Risk identification and analysis techniques
  • Quality validation and verification techniques

Domain V, Closing - 7%

Task I: Collect the final acceptance of the project deliverables from the relevant stakeholders as confirmation that the project scope and deliverables were achieved.

Task II: According to the project plan, transfer the ownership of deliverables to the assigned stakeholders so that the project closure can be facilitated.

Task III: Obtain financial, legal and administrative closure via the accepted practices and policies so that a formal closure of the project can be attained and a transfer of liability can be ensured.

Task IV: According to the communications management plan, prepare and share the final project report so that the project performance can be documented and conveyed as well as project evaluation can be assisted.

Task V: Collect and combine the lessons that were learned throughout the project and conduct a project review so that the organization’s knowledge base can be updated.

Task VI: Archive the materials and project documents by making use of the generally accepted practices so that statutory requirements can be complied with and for potential use in future projects and audits.

Task VII: Use appropriate tools and techniques to get feedback from relevant stakeholders so that their satisfaction can be evaluated.

Knowledge and Skills

  • Archiving practices and statutes
  • Contract closure requirements
  • Feedback techniques
  • Project review techniques
  • Active listening
  • Benefits realization
  • Business acumen
  • Coaching, mentoring, training, and motivational techniques
  • Configuration management
  • Customer satisfaction metrics
  • Decision making
  • Diversity and cultural sensitivity
  • Expert judgment technique
  • Generational sensitivity and diversity
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Leadership tools, techniques, and skills
  • Meeting management techniques
  • Organizational and operational awareness
  • Presentation tools and techniques
  • Problem-solving tools and techniques
  • Quality assurance and control techniques
  • Risk assessment techniques
  • Stakeholder management techniques
  • Virtual/remote team management
  • Compliance (statute/organization)
  • Close-out procedures
  • Performance measurement techniques
  • Transition planning technique
  • Applicable laws and regulations
  • Brainstorming techniques
  • Change management techniques
  • Communication channels, tools, techniques, and methods
  • Conflict resolution
  • Data gathering techniques
  • Delegation techniques
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Facilitation
  • Information management tools, techniques, and methods
  • Knowledge management
  • Lessons learned management techniques
  • Negotiating and influencing techniques and skills
  • Peer-review processes
  • Prioritization/time management
  • Project finance principles
  • Relationship management
  • Situational awareness
  • Team-building techniques

Tips for passing and preparing for PMP® Exam

PMP® exam requires a lot of dedication and efforts in order to clear it at one go. The following tips will surely help you to prepare and pass your PMP® exam:

  1. Memorise all formulas to easily answer the math questions.
  2. Spend around 4 hours to practice full sample exams at one sitting.
  3. On the day of your exam, use your time effectively to answer 200 questions within 4 hours. You will have 1 minute to answer each question.
  4. Answer all questions, do not leave any question blank.
  5. Use the process of elimination for obviously incorrect answer options to maximise probability in case you are not sure about the correct answer.
  6. Avoid spending too much time on any single question. If you are spending more than 2 minutes on a single question then you can make your best guess for the answer and mark it for review at the end of the exam.
  7. Try to reserve the last 10 minutes to review the marked questions.
  8. Read all the answer options before selecting an answer.
  9. Keep in mind that some questions may provide hints to other questions in the exam.
  10. Wear comfortable cloth and footwear on the day of your exam.

To wrap it up!

The PMP® certification acts as a validation of a professional’s experience in project management and is a challenging process as well. Start preparing well for the five domains (Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing) in advance so that you can ace the examination and get nearer to achieving your dream career. All the best!

KnowledgeHut

KnowledgeHut

Author

KnowledgeHut is an outcome-focused global ed-tech company. We help organizations and professionals unlock excellence through skills development. We offer training solutions under the people and process, data science, full-stack development, cybersecurity, future technologies and digital transformation verticals.
Website : https://www.knowledgehut.com

Join the Discussion

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Suggested Blogs

What are the benefits of training for PRINCE2?

The era of rapid changeWe are living in an era where change has become the norm rather than an exception. Emerging technologies and market unpredictability have further fueled change, impacting all industries globally. But the true test of an organization's capability is its ability to endure change and adapt to it.  This is the philosophy of ‘Kaizen’ or changing for the better, that helps organizations stay competitive, relevant and in focus with the customer.  If there is change, there are also ways to cope with it. Project management methodologies provide a framework that helps organizations streamlines processes and emerge stronger. One of the most popular project management methodologies is the PRINCE2® (PRojects IN Controlled Environments).  It is a structured, process-based method for effective project management and is based on experience drawn from several projects, their stakeholders and academia.Having originated in the 1970s, it has been revised year on year with its latest updates, the 6th edition being the current version that was brought out in 2017.  is now owned by AXELOS Limited UK. While it was originally used as a standard for projects in the UK, it is now endorsed globally across organizations and projects.Benefits of using PRINCE2® project managementThis methodology offers several benefits, such as:It is a proven best practice which can be applied to any projectClarity of responsibilities related to the project management teamFocus on productsImproved communication and controlProper representation of stakeholdersMechanisms for escalation or exception management (refer example below)Continued project justificationContinual learning and improvement…and more.Example of applying one of the benefits of PRINCE2:When the project manager is not able to prevent a possible deviation beyond the allowed budget for a particular stage of the project, it needs to be escalated to the next upper level of management in a specific manner.Note that PRINCE2 is a method, with a set of project management activities, roles and techniques to perform the activities. Organizations may choose to use PRINCE2 as their project management standard. In such cases, its effectiveness may be benchmarked by performing a formal health check and maturity assessments endorsed by PRINCE2.Project management standardsThere are also several project management standards such as:“A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (the PMBOK® Guide)”, from Project Management Institute (PMI®.)The various Competence Baselines from International Project Management Association (IPMA)ISO 21500 Guidance on Project Management from ISOBS6079 Project Management Principles and Guidance from British Standards Institution (BSI)APM Body of Knowledge from Association for Project Management (APM)Such standards provide rules, principles, guidelines and concepts which may be used to ensure effective project management, thereby increasing the project’s chance of success. These standards should be applied as appropriate to the business when PRINCE2 is being used by the organization.Example of combining a standard or body of knowledge and the PRINCE2 method:An organization may decide to apply the standard for cost estimation or controlling quality from PMI’s PMBOK Guide when using the PRINCE2 method for managing their projects.The PMBOK® Guide is a body of knowledge while PRINCE2 is a structured method. The former reinforces the science while the other provides a structured approach. Thus, both complement each other.What is PRINCE2 certification training?The PRINCE2 certification suiteThe PRINCE2 product portfolio offers Foundation and Practitioner level certifications for PRINCE2 and PRINCE2 Agile. About two days of training is recommended for each of them and self-study is also allowed.  The exams are offered in several languages. The syllabus is based on the official PRINCE2 and PRINCE2 Agile guidance from AXELOS.PrerequisitesPrerequisites apply only for the Practitioner exams, for which either the Foundation or an equivalent certification is required. Practitioner certificates are valid for 3 years and may be renewed by maintaining AXELOS PRINCE2 membership and claiming a minimum of 20 CPDs (continuing professional development) units annually, or by appearing for a re-registration exam.  CurriculumTrainings cover in detail the PRINCE2 integrated environment, the 7 principles,  the 7 themes, the 7 processes and project tailoring. Some of the projects I worked in were based on the PRINCE2 method, though some were adopted to the organization’s ways of working.The PRINCE2 Agile course further provides a detailed understanding of how to blend PRINCE2 with various agile concepts, frameworks, behavior and techniques. Those of you who are familiar with highly used frameworks like Scrum, Kanban, SAFe and others will be able to understand and appreciate how to blend them with PRINCE2 using PRINCE2 Agile project management.Example of blending agile concepts and techniques with PRINCE2 Agile:PRINCE2 product descriptions may be described and agreed in the form of a collection of user stories or epics rather than in the traditional form of requirement specifications.KnowledgeHut PRINCE2 trainings have been designed to give you complete clarity on the style and syllabus of the certification exams, along with detailed descriptions on all relevant concepts, exam questionnaire practice, case studies and scenarios for real world understanding, exam tips and extensive study materials.Exam detailsThe exams are administered by the exam body organization PeopleCert on behalf of AXELOS. One has to create an account on the PeopleCert website and register for the exam before appearing for it. There is also a retake option purchasable at a significantly lower exam fee.The PRINCE2 Foundation is a 60 questions exam of 1 hour duration. It is multiple choice based, wherein recall of concepts and understanding are tested. A minimum score of 33 marks is necessary to pass the exam.PRINCE2 Practitioner is a 2.5 hour exam of 68 questions (or 46 as some questions are clubbed), based on a scenario. A minimum score of 38 is necessary to pass the exam. It is an open book exam; only the official hard copy of the PRINCE2 manual is allowed, except when specified (such as during the COVID19 pandemic) wherein an online version is being allowed on a second system until a date as specified by AXELOS.What is not covered in PRINCE2?Though some of the below listed topics are described briefly in the guidance, they are not part of the certification syllabus. These may be learned in detail through other literature and certification trainings, such as Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)® or Project Management Professional (PMP)® and others (International Association for Project Management or IPMA, Association for Project Management or APM, etc.):Skills and competencies required by a project managerPeople managementStakeholder identification & engagement techniquesTask scheduling, scheduling techniques like critical path method, resource optimization, schedule compression, etc.Estimation techniquesCosting and budgeting techniques, including reserve managementBusiness analysis or requirements gathering techniquesIndustry specific product solution and design techniques like product analysisDetailed quality control and assurance techniquesTechniques for risk identification & analysisDetailed communications aspects such as communication requirements analysisSpecific monitoring and controlling techniques such as earned value management, trend analysis, root cause analysis and othersSpecialized project management areas like project procurement or safetyWhat are the reasons for you to choose PRINCE2 certification and training? Increasing usage of PRINCE2Over the years, use of PRINCE2 has expanded to many countries and industries due to its structured way of handling projects, while at the same time allowing flexibility to apply other approaches and techniques that suit the project.While PRINCE2 specifies advantages or benefits of applying it, let us look at how learning and becoming certified in PRINCE2 will help you meet your aspirations in particular.Impact of automation on project managementAs day-to-day operations get more and more automated, human resources will become more involved with the management of projects. This will result in a demand for capable project managers who are skilled in decision making, stakeholder engagement, collaboration, and other areas which can be performed better by humans than machines.How can the PRINCE2 method  benefit you?PRINCE2 is among the most widely used project management methodologies due to the numerous advantages it offers. But how does it help an individual PRINCE2 holder? Let's take a look:It is a proven best practice and governance approach for project management. Therefore, you will be able to apply the right approaches to help succeed in your projects.It works for all types of projects (size, scale, industry, country, culture) and industry-specific methods and models. So, the more you practice PRINCE2, the better you become at managing all types of projects.It promotes involvement of key stakeholders, such as those from business, user and supplier areas. This promotes collaboration. This also indicates that PRINCE2 accommodates agility. The amount of agility may be tailored by adopting agile practices or frameworks such as Scrum or Kanban along with PRINCE2, and other agile concepts, behaviors and techniques.  It provides clarity of project management roles and responsibilities. This facilitates better accountability, delegation, authority and communication. For you, the role of the project manager becomes much clearer.As PRINCE2 projects are managed by exception, sufficient freedom is given to the project manager to handle the project. This is done by defining boundaries for when escalation is necessary to be done to the next upper management level. There will be other points on which the project manager will provide information to the upper management for decision making. It is said that if there are no escalations in a PRINCE2 project, then there is no need for meetings, only reports and consultations suffice. Isn’t that great news?For those who are working in product-based organizations, the good news is that PRINCE2 has a high product focus during planning. This means that product planning is done first before understanding the work that needs to be performed to deliver products.There is high focus on the justification of the project in the form of a business case. Though traditionally, business sponsors own the business case, in PRINCE2 the project manager is involved in creating and maintaining the business case; thus supporting the sponsor and providing project performance information when required.PRINCE2 promotes continual learning and improvement. As you might be aware, this has become important and relevant in the rapidly changing information age we are in.Because PRINCE2 provides a common vocabulary, it promotes the use of common language among project members which makes relevant communications consistent. However, PRINCE2 is very flexible, therefore organizations may still use their own vocabulary while understanding how it maps to PRINCE2.Reflect for a moment, which of the above are top reasons for you to get certified in PRINCE2.  For me, it is all of them but if you put me in a spot and ask me to pick only three of them, then they will be 1, 7 and 8.  1 because it raises my confidence in handling projects7 because it allows me to go beyond traditional project manager responsibilities and even support the project sponsor8 because continual learning and improvement will enable me to understand and support businesses and customers even betterConclusionA lot of literature is available online, relating to project management careers and certifications. However, we focused on a few key things.We first understood what PRINCE2 is and how it relates to project management standards and bodies of knowledge. Next, we looked into PRINCE2 certification levels and curriculum, along with what is not covered by PRINCE2. Though the PRINCE2 Agile certifications were also mentioned, we focused on the PRINCE2 certifications only.PRINCE2’s relevance in the digital era and its impact on project management was briefly highlighted. Finally, the advantages of PRINCE2 and how they might rightly connect with your own aspirations were listed. Hope you found your own connects from that list or maybe even added your own.
9556
What are the benefits of training for PRINCE2?

The era of rapid changeWe are living in an era whe... Read More

Reflective Understanding of Prince2® Principles in a Project Environment in 2021

Managing successful projects in diverse areas such as construction, IT, banking, research and product development or in the field of health and service industry requires adoption of best practices that are pan-geographical. Post-COVID, the world is slowly recovering emotionally and economically, and what is needed are robust recovery measures such as project management best practices that will hasten up this recovery and help make things normal again.  It is becoming imperative that a project, once initiated, becomes a success. That is where the methodology of PRINCE2® (P2) comes into play. Projects in a Controlled Environment viz PRINCE2 is one of the most widely accepted methodologies for managing projects world over. Thousands of project sponsors, project managers and project teams, trainers and consultants have contributed to format the P2 methodology.  To be an independent project or a programme manager, one has to be a certified P2 practitioner. There are two parts to the P2 Certification. The first is the Foundational Level, and once you gain this, you can go for the Practitioner Level examination. Gaining the P2 Foundation, or any one of a number of certifications such as the PMQ, PPQ, PMP, CAPM or IPMA Level A,B,C or D is mandatory in order to be able to appear for the P2 Practitioner exam.  The popularity of P2 is attributable to the fact that it can be applied to any type of project, it can be tailored to meet the specific needs of the project and above all, it is based on established and proven best practices and governance for project management. A certification in P2 is thus valuable to enhance one’s market value as a project manager. Structure of PRINCE2® The four integrated elements of P2 are Principles, Themes, Processes and the Project environment. P2 Principles. These are the guiding obligations and good practices which help determine whether a project is strictly being managed using P2. All the seven Principles discussed in succeeding paragraphs have to be followed if a project has to qualify as a P2 project. P2 Themes. There are seven themes namely, Business Case, Organization, Quality, Plans, Risk, Change and Progress which are the aspects of project management that need to be addressed continually and in parallel throughout the project. Themes are the knowledge areas that one must master to be a successful P2 practitioner.  BC theme tells us why we are doing a project.  Organization theme tells us who will do what. The roles of Project Board (Executive, Senior User and Supplier), the Project Manager, Team Manager, Project Assurance and Quality Assurance are listed in detail.  The Quality theme covers the quality specifications and mechanism to ensure that the product produced is ‘fit for purpose’.  The Plans theme tells us when and at what cost the activities are sequenced.  The Risk theme helps us identify, track and manage all risks. It answers the question ‘What if’.  The Change theme tells us how to handle issues and measure the impact.  The Progress theme helps us to monitor the project through reports and tolerances. It answers the question ‘where we were’ and ‘where we are now’ at any stage of the project.P2 Processes. There are seven processes that describe a progression of a project so that a project manager can proceed logically from Starting a Project to Closing a project. The processes have a check list of activities, documents and state of products at every step. The seven processes are Starting up a Project, Directing a Project, Initiating a Project, Managing a Stage Boundary, Controlling a Stage, Managing Product Delivery and Closing a Project. P2 is thus a 7X7X7 matrix that ensures that projects are managed successfully.The Project Environment. Organizations may not want to apply the themes and processes in a rigid manner to all projects. They can thus tailor their projects depending upon the size and complexity of the project. This way, they can create their own project environment. The Seven Principles Let us now have a look at the Principles of P2. All these Principles should be practiced throughout the life of a project. Remember, none of them can be omitted or tailored. Continued Business Justification: Every P2 project requires that there is justifiable reason for starting a project. This justification is recorded and approved. The validation of this justification is checked at the end of each stage throughout the life of the project. The moment it is realized that the project does not have a justifiable reason or business case, then either the direction of the project is changed, or the project is prematurely closed. Closing a project does in no way imply that the project has failed but it may be a wise decision under the circumstances. Learn From Experience: When we start a project, it is essential that we learn from the experiences of past projects. What went well, what did not go so well, are the questions a project manager has to ask. He/she may also learn from the records of organizations who have undertaken similar projects. This happens when starting a project. As the project progresses the project manager continues to learn by recording events in relevant reports and reviews. Similarly, when the project closes then we pass on lessons to future project managers by including them in the lessons report. Defined Roles and Responsibilities: Every project has a temporary team structure. The role of each and every member of the team is well defined.  This ensures that lines of communication between each of the members of the project team as well as with business sponsors, users and suppliers are open and clearly aligned with the objectives of the project. The defined roles and responsibilities provide answers to the question “What is expected of me?” Manage by Stages: This is one of the most interesting features of P2 principles. It states that the project work can be partitioned in workable chunks. These are referred to as stages. Management by stages ensures that the project has been properly initiated. The end of each stage provides us the opportunity to review the Business Case or Business Justification and seek approval of the Project Board to proceed with the next stage. The Board authorizes one stage at a time. This is done as the project progresses towards closure. The number of stages a project must have depends upon the complexity and size of the project. However, every P2 project has minimum 2 stages viz Initiating a project and Closing a project, in case it is learnt that the project is not aligned with the benefits it was supposed to achieve. Manage By Exception: The three levels of managing a P2 project are Directing a Project (Project Board), Managing a Project (Project Manager) and Delivering a Project (Team Manager). The six aspects of a project which a project Manager has to control are Cost, Time, Quality, Scope, Benefits and Risk. Each of these aspects has tolerances allotted at each level of the plan viz Project Plan, Stage Plan and Team Plan. When a Project Manager or a Team Manager realizes that a certain element of CTQSBR is going to exceed its tolerance limit he can raise an exception report at the appropriate level (Team Manager to Project Manager, Project Manager to Project Board and Project Board to Corporate).  However, if a level of management feels that they can bring the project back on track without exceeding the tolerance allotted to a particular aspect, then they make a mention of it in stage report. This is Manage by Exception and provides efficient use of senior management time. Remember that every exception has to be approved by the Project Board or corporate, if the Project Board feels it needs more money or time to complete the project.  Focus on Products:  A P2 project focuses on producing a product. A product means the output of a project which has been undertaken to bring about a change in the organization. This output can be measurable or non-measurable. In other words, tangible or intangible. The Output in P2 means a specialist product (what the project is meant to produce) or management product (records, registers etc.) There are 26 Management Products. Baselines Benefits Management Approach Business Case Change Control Approach Communication Management Approach Plan Product Description Project Brief Project Initiation Documentation Project Product Description Quality Management Approach Risk Management Approach Work Package Records                                               Daily Log    Issue Register Lessons Log Quality Register Risk Register ReportsCheckpoint Report  End Project Report  End Stage Report  Highlight Report Exception Report Issue Report  Lessons Report Both the Specialist and Management products are subject to quality testing and should be ‘fit for purpose’. The quality criteria, quality methods, composition, and derivation if any, are studied and documented in the Product Description. A PD helps determine Efforts, Estimates, Resource requirements, Dependencies and Activity schedules which aid in planning and defining a product’s purpose. In other words, the Scope remains within its boundaries. Tailor to Suit the Project:  A P2 project can be tailored according to its size and Complexity, Importance, Team Capability, Risks and Environment in which it is operating. Tailoring helps you use resources appropriately. Effort and approach in carrying out a project can be made appropriate. Tailoring ensures that one neither follows a method of project management mechanically nor chaotically where there is no method at all. The project approach that is methodical is most likely to succeed.  Summary PRINCE2 is one of the most flexible project management methodologies evolved over the years by the Office of Commerce, UK through Axelos and has been adopted by all commonwealth nations since its Version 2 was released in 1989. A certification as a P2 Practitioner will ensure that one would be qualified to handle projects independently as a Project Manager par excellence. 
9557
Reflective Understanding of Prince2® Principle...

Managing successful projects in diverse areas... Read More

Meetings And Their Relevance In Separating Governance From Management

What is management? What is the difference between governing body and management? What is the relevance of meetings in management? Does the management layer need to conduct so many meetings? Seems like simple questions not sure how well it is understood and applied.I am sure most of us have attended or conducted meetings as a part of management governance. Meetings are a part of management governance and are certainly required, but today’s managers spend most of their time in meetings, and so important activities of the management layer has taken a back seat. There is an urgent need to separate governance from management.Harvard Business Review did a survey of managers about the effectiveness of meetings, the findings are shocking.65% said meetings keep them from completing their own work. 71% said meetings are unproductive and inefficient. 64% said meetings come at the expense of deep thinking. 62% said meetings miss opportunities to bring the team closer together.The US alone wastes $37 billion per year on unproductive meetings.Based on a Verizon study, 91% of people admit to daydreaming in meetings, and 39% to dozing off. So before you schedule that next meeting, take a moment to think whether it's really needed.Someone once said to me meeting is where minutes are made and hours are lost. How right he is, I am sure most of you reading this piece will completely agree with this statement. There are many meetings which end with the scheduled date for next meeting. The main objective of meetings is value creation, but due to excessive time spent on meetings it fails to add any value.You will realize there are layers in the organization who are involved in just conducting meetings without any outcome and consider this as an effective way of management. Management layer should ideally be involved in planning, executing work or removing roadblock, there should be minimum time spent on meetings. But in reality, the management spends most of the time conducting or attending meetings. Most activities are left to the lower layer of the organization to perform with minimum or no support from management.Even the top management places a huge emphasis on meetings. In many of the meetings, participants who are not required are invited and are required to join.Organizations should relook at the way meetings are done. They should place emphasis on reduction in the number of meetings conducted by the management. If companies reduce the number of unwanted meetings conducted there will certainly be huge savings in cost for the organization, also management will have time to do the actual work.PMO or a dedicated team in all organization should be the custodian of data and information, they should be able to present data as part of meetings. One individual from the management layer should be present for clarification.Management layer should conduct very minimal meetings, the focus should be on getting the activities done and removing the roadblocks. Management should be agile with progress update being near real-time, the meetings should be need-based and agile.Are there ways to reduce the meetings? The answer is yes. Let’s look at how this can be done.Ways to reduce internal meetings:1.Invest in Collaboration Software2.Measure the cost of meetings3.Choose meeting-free day for the team4.Enforce the use of meeting agenda5.Stop attending valueless meetings6.Block your calendar time for important tasks7. Invite only required stakeholders for the meetingManagement has too many layers of managers, who conduct meetings and are less involved in the actual activities. All of us have experienced this, whenever there is an issue there are more managers added to resolve the issue, unfortunately, the focus of the manager is to conduct more meetings. There is less focus on adding people at the actual execution layer to resolve the issue. Managers should ideally spend most of their time on the below activities-  Making Decisions – Managers must decide how to make the best use of the resources available and negotiate for the resources that they need. Managers may have to make decisions about what changes should be made, and they often have to react to unplanned events. Gathering and Distributing Information – Managers have to identify and gather all of the necessary information that they need. Much of this information may also have to be passed on to others. Using Interpersonal Skills – Managers need to interact closely with people inside and outside of the organization. As leaders, they must direct their teams to meet organizational objectives. They may also have to represent their department or their company to the external world.If you’re a middle manager, it’s likely that about 35%-40% of your time is spent on meetings and if you’re in upper management, it can be a whopping 50% and above. What’s worse is how unproductive these meetings as part of governance usually are. The idea behind writing this article is to bring the focus back on the actual work of the management, and to reduce unwanted meetings conducted by the management.
Meetings And Their Relevance In Separating Governa...

What is management? What is the difference between... Read More