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Installation Guide to Jenkins

Jenkins is a Java-based open-source automation tool with plugins designed for ongoing integration. Jenkins is used to constantly develop and test software projects that help developers to incorporate project modifications and make it simpler for users to achieve a new build. The Jenkins allows developers to quickly locate and resolve flaws in a code base and to automatically test their structures. Jenkins can be changed and expanded readily on all operating platforms and various devices, whether OS X, Windows or Linux.  It immediately deploys code, produces test reports. During integration and continuous delivery, Jenkins can be configured according to the demands.System Requirements for Jenkins InstallationFollowing are the software and hardware requirements for installing Jenkins:Minimum hardware requirements:256 MB of RAM1 GB of drive space (although 10 GB is a recommended minimum if running Jenkins as a Docker container)Recommended hardware configuration for a small team:1 GB+ of RAM50 GB+ of drive spaceInstallation on WindowsYou must first install JDK. Jenkins promotes JDK8 only at this time. Jenkins can be installed when Java is running. The recent Jenkins package for Windows (presently version 2.191) can be downloaded. Click on the Jenkins exe file to unzip the file into a folder.To begin the installation click on "Next."To install Jenkins in another directory, click the "Change..." button. I'll hold the default choice in this instance and click on "Next."To begin the installation process, click on the "Install" button.The installation is being processed.When finished, you can finish the setup by clicking the "Finish" button.The URL http:/localhost:8080 will automatically be redirected to a Jenkins local page or the browser can be pasted.Copy and paste the password from the C:\Program Files (x85)\Jenkins\secrets\initialAdminPassword file for Jenkins unlocking. Click on the button "Continue."The suggested plugins or chosen plugins that you select can be installed. We will install the suggested plugins to maintain it easy.Wait for the complete installation of plugins.The next step is to build a Jenkins admin user. Click "Save and Continue." Please enter your information.To finish the Jenkins setup, click on "Save and Finish."To begin Jenkins, click on "Start using Jenkins."Below is the default page of Jenkins.Jenkins Installation on Linux/CentOS 7 systemMake sure that you are signed in as a user with sudo privileges before continuing this tutorial.The first step is to install Java, Jenkins being a Java application. To set up OpenJDK 8 package, execute the following command:$ sudo yum install java-1.8.0-openjdk-develJenkins does not currently support Java 10 (and Java 11). Make sure that Java 8 is the default Java version when multiple Java versions are installed on your computer.The next step is to allow the repository of Jenkins. To do so, use the following curl command to import the GPG key:$ curl --silent --location http://pkg.jenkins-ci.org/redhat-stable/jenkins.repo | sudo tee /etc/yum.repos.d/jenkins.repoAdd your system's repository with:$ sudo rpm --import https://jenkins-ci.org/redhat/jenkins-ci.org.keyUpon activation of the repository, install the recent stable Jenkins version by typing:$ sudo yum install jenkinsUpon completion of the installation, begin the Jenkins service with:$ sudo systemctl start jenkinsTo verify if it has been successful, check with below command:$ systemctl status jenkinsSomething like this you should see:Outputjenkins.service - LSB: Jenkins Automation ServerLoaded: loaded (/etc/rc.d/init.d/jenkins; bad; vendor preset: disabled)Active: active (running) since Thu 2018-09-20 14:58:21 UTC; 15s agoDocs: man:systemd-sysv-generator(8)Process: 2367 ExecStart=/etc/rc.d/init.d/jenkins start (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)CGroup: /system.slice/jenkins.serviceFinally, allow the Jenkins service to start on system boot $ sudo systemctl enable jenkinsOutputjenkins.service is not a native service, redirecting to /sbin/chkconfig.Executing /sbin/chkconfig jenkins onOpening Firewall portIf you install Jenkins on a remote CentOS firewall-protected server, port 8080 is necessary. To open   the required port, use the following instructions:$ sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-port=8080/tcpsudo firewall-cmd --reloadSetting JenkinsOpen your browser and type in your domain or IP address followed by port 8080 in order to set your fresh Jenkins setup:http://your_ip_or_domain:8080Below screen will be displayed which prompts you to enter the admin password generated during setup:To print the password on your terminal, use the following instructions: $ sudo cat /var/lib/jenkins/secrets/initialAdminPasswordThe alphanumeric password should be 32 characters long, as shown below:Output 3226*****************************Copy your terminal password, paste it in the password field for the Administrator and click on Continue.On the next screen, you are asked if you would like to install or pick certain plugins. To begin the installation process instantly, just click on the Install suggested plug-ins box.When the installation is finished, the first administrative user is prompted for the setting. Fill in all the necessary data. and click the Save and Continue.On your next page, the URL for the Jenkins instance will be requested. An automatically produced URL will be added to the URL field.To finish the configuration, click the Save and Finish button to verify the setup.Finally,  click start using  Jenkins Button to start the process and the user we created in one of the past steps as admin user will log in Jenkins dashboard.You have effectively mounted Jenkins on your CentOS scheme when you have reached this point.Jenkins Installation on MacPrerequisiteA Mac machine with Mac OSX Yosemite or higher with admin accessInstallation of Java Development Kit on the machine.Access to Git, Svn, etc. remote repository.Download Jenkins installer.pkg file from Jenkins ' official website and get through the wizard setup.The jenkins setup wizard sets up a distinct Jenkins user on your system.We need to make some changes in the ‘Users & Groups’ section as well. Do follow below steps.Open ‘System Preferences -> Users & Groups’Click on the Lock icon located in the bottom left corner which reads, ‘Click the lock to make changes’. Enter your login password.Under the ‘Other Users’ section you may see the user without any name but with admin rights. This is our Jenkins user. Let's rename it.Right-click the empty user and select Advanced Options. This will show you all the details. Give the ‘Full name’ as Jenkins. Press OKClick on ‘Reset Password’. Enter a new password and make sure that you remember this.Now our Jenkins user is almost ready.This is just like another mac user with admin rights.Now restart your Mac machine and log in with Jenkins user with the password which you just reset.Click the lock to save the changes and restart the system to login with Jenkins user account.In localhost Jenkins resides at port 8080.Open your browser, go to localhost:8080 and make the original set-up, which consists of installing some plugins and creating account for safety purpose.Setting Jenkins as Launch agentJenkins operates by default as a daemon. A daemon is a non-interactive background that operates in the entire scheme and is not linked to a particular user.Much of CI runs simulators and other GUI apps, so another option is required. You can modify Jenkins as a launch agent to resolve this. On behalf of the user, a launch agent operates behind the scenes.You need to edit the settings folder and alter your place to begin rebooting automatically if you want to alter how the Jenkins process is started.Enter the below command to unload Jenkins as a Daemonsudolaunchctlunload/Library/LaunchDaemons/org.jenkins-ci.plistNext, migrate to the LaunchAgents folder the.plist file which defines how Jenkins will be running.sudo mv /Library/LaunchDaemons/org.jenkins-ci.plist /Library/LaunchAgents/Start the jenkins again and now it will run as launch agent.

Installation Guide to Jenkins

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  • by Ashish Kumar
  • 25th Sep, 2019
  • Last updated on 11th Mar, 2021
  • 10 mins read
Installation Guide to Jenkins

Jenkins is a Java-based open-source automation tool with plugins designed for ongoing integration. Jenkins is used to constantly develop and test software projects that help developers to incorporate project modifications and make it simpler for users to achieve a new build. The Jenkins allows developers to quickly locate and resolve flaws in a code base and to automatically test their structures. Jenkins can be changed and expanded readily on all operating platforms and various devices, whether OS X, Windows or Linux.  It immediately deploys code, produces test reports. During integration and continuous delivery, Jenkins can be configured according to the demands.

Jenkins can be configuration

System Requirements for Jenkins Installation

Following are the software and hardware requirements for installing Jenkins:

Minimum hardware requirements:

  • 256 MB of RAM
  • 1 GB of drive space (although 10 GB is a recommended minimum if running Jenkins as a Docker container)

Recommended hardware configuration for a small team:

  • 1 GB+ of RAM
  • 50 GB+ of drive space

Installation on Windows

You must first install JDK. Jenkins promotes JDK8 only at this time. Jenkins can be installed when Java is running. The recent Jenkins package for Windows (presently version 2.191) can be downloaded. Click on the Jenkins exe file to unzip the file into a folder.

Jenkins Installation on Windows

To begin the installation click on "Next."

Jenkins Installation on Windows

To install Jenkins in another directory, click the "Change..." button. I'll hold the default choice in this instance and click on "Next."

Jenkins in another directory

To begin the installation process, click on the "Install" button.

Jenkins Installation on Windows

The installation is being processed.

The installation in Jenkins

When finished, you can finish the setup by clicking the "Finish" button.

Completed the jenkins steps

The URL http:/localhost:8080 will automatically be redirected to a Jenkins local page or the browser can be pasted.

Unlock jenkins

Copy and paste the password from the C:\Program Files (x85)\Jenkins\secrets\initialAdminPassword file for Jenkins unlocking. Click on the button "Continue."

Unlock jenkins

The suggested plugins or chosen plugins that you select can be installed. We will install the suggested plugins to maintain it easy.

Customize Jenkins

Wait for the complete installation of plugins.

Started window of jenkins

The next step is to build a Jenkins admin user. Click "Save and Continue." Please enter your information.

Create first admin user in jenkins

To finish the Jenkins setup, click on "Save and Finish."

Instance configuration Jenkins

To begin Jenkins, click on "Start using Jenkins."

Jenkins Ready window

Below is the default page of Jenkins.

Welcome window of jenkins

Jenkins Installation on Linux/CentOS 7 system

Make sure that you are signed in as a user with sudo privileges before continuing this tutorial.

  • The first step is to install Java, Jenkins being a Java application. To set up OpenJDK 8 package, execute the following command:
$ sudo yum install java-1.8.0-openjdk-devel

Jenkins does not currently support Java 10 (and Java 11). Make sure that Java 8 is the default Java version when multiple Java versions are installed on your computer.

  • The next step is to allow the repository of Jenkins. To do so, use the following curl command to import the GPG key:
$ curl --silent --location http://pkg.jenkins-ci.org/redhat-stable/jenkins.repo | sudo tee /etc/yum.repos.d/jenkins.repo

Add your system's repository with:

$ sudo rpm --import https://jenkins-ci.org/redhat/jenkins-ci.org.key
  • Upon activation of the repository, install the recent stable Jenkins version by typing:
$ sudo yum install jenkins
  • Upon completion of the installation, begin the Jenkins service with:
$ sudo systemctl start jenkins
  • To verify if it has been successful, check with below command:
$ systemctl status jenkins
  • Something like this you should see:

Output

jenkins.service - LSB: Jenkins Automation Server

Loaded: loaded (/etc/rc.d/init.d/jenkins; bad; vendor preset: disabled)

Active: active (running) since Thu 2018-09-20 14:58:21 UTC; 15s ago

Docs: man:systemd-sysv-generator(8)

Process: 2367 ExecStart=/etc/rc.d/init.d/jenkins start (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)

CGroup: /system.slice/jenkins.service

  • Finally, allow the Jenkins service to start on system boot 
$ sudo systemctl enable jenkins

Output

jenkins.service is not a native service, redirecting to /sbin/chkconfig.

Executing /sbin/chkconfig jenkins on

Opening Firewall port

If you install Jenkins on a remote CentOS firewall-protected server, port 8080 is necessary. To open   the required port, use the following instructions:

$ sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-port=8080/tcpsudo firewall-cmd --reload

Setting Jenkins

Open your browser and type in your domain or IP address followed by port 8080 in order to set your fresh Jenkins setup:

http://your_ip_or_domain:8080

Below screen will be displayed which prompts you to enter the admin password generated during setup:

Setting Jenkins

To print the password on your terminal, use the following instructions:

 $ sudo cat /var/lib/jenkins/secrets/initialAdminPassword

The alphanumeric password should be 32 characters long, as shown below:

Output 

3226*****************************

Copy your terminal password, paste it in the password field for the Administrator and click on Continue.

Costomize Jenkins

On the next screen, you are asked if you would like to install or pick certain plugins. To begin the installation process instantly, just click on the Install suggested plug-ins box.

Started window of Jenkins

When the installation is finished, the first administrative user is prompted for the setting. Fill in all the necessary data. and click the Save and Continue.

Creating first admin user in Jenkins

On your next page, the URL for the Jenkins instance will be requested. An automatically produced URL will be added to the URL field.

Instance configuration in Jenkins

To finish the configuration, click the Save and Finish button to verify the setup.

Window of Jenkins is ready

Finally,  click start using  Jenkins Button to start the process and the user we created in one of the past steps as admin user will log in Jenkins dashboard.

Jenkins welcome window

You have effectively mounted Jenkins on your CentOS scheme when you have reached this point.

Jenkins Installation on Mac

Prerequisite

  • A Mac machine with Mac OSX Yosemite or higher with admin access
  • Installation of Java Development Kit on the machine.
  • Access to Git, Svn, etc. remote repository.

Download Jenkins installer.pkg file from Jenkins ' official website and get through the wizard setup.

Jenkins official website and get through the wizard setup

The jenkins setup wizard sets up a distinct Jenkins user on your system.We need to make some changes in the ‘Users & Groups’ section as well. Do follow below steps.

  • Open ‘System Preferences -> Users & Groups’
  • Click on the Lock icon located in the bottom left corner which reads, ‘Click the lock to make changes’. Enter your login password.
  • Under the ‘Other Users’ section you may see the user without any name but with admin rights. This is our Jenkins user. Let's rename it.
  • Right-click the empty user and select Advanced Options. This will show you all the details. Give the ‘Full name’ as Jenkins. Press OK
  • Click on ‘Reset Password’. Enter a new password and make sure that you remember this.

Now our Jenkins user is almost ready.This is just like another mac user with admin rights.Now restart your Mac machine and log in with Jenkins user with the password which you just reset.

Click the lock to save the changes and restart the system to login with Jenkins user account.

In localhost Jenkins resides at port 8080.

Open your browser, go to localhost:8080 and make the original set-up, which consists of installing some plugins and creating account for safety purpose.

Welcome to Jenkins

Setting Jenkins as Launch agent

  • Jenkins operates by default as a daemon. A daemon is a non-interactive background that operates in the entire scheme and is not linked to a particular user.
  • Much of CI runs simulators and other GUI apps, so another option is required. You can modify Jenkins as a launch agent to resolve this. On behalf of the user, a launch agent operates behind the scenes.
  • You need to edit the settings folder and alter your place to begin rebooting automatically if you want to alter how the Jenkins process is started.
  • Enter the below command to unload Jenkins as a Daemon
    sudolaunchctlunload/Library/LaunchDaemons/org.jenkins-ci.plist
  • Next, migrate to the LaunchAgents folder the.plist file which defines how Jenkins will be running.
    sudo mv /Library/LaunchDaemons/org.jenkins-ci.plist /Library/LaunchAgents/
  • Start the jenkins again and now it will run as launch agent.
Ashish

Ashish Kumar

Senior Technology Specialist

Ashish is working as a Senior Technology Specialist in leading financial bank has more than 13 years of experience in developing enterprise applications

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It's simple to enable Hyper-V, but first, make sure your PC meets the following requirements:Your operating system should be Windows 10 (Enterprise, Pro, or Education), withAt least 4GB of RAM and CPU Virtualization support, though you should double-check that it's turned on in your BIOS settings.You can disable or enable features like Hyper-V that may not be pre-installed when Windows is installed. Always keep in mind that some of the features require internet access to download additional Windows Update components.To enable Hyper-V on your machine, follow the steps below:1. Open the Control Panel.2. Select Programs from the left panel.3. Next, go to Programs and Features, then Turn Windows Features On or Off.4. Examine Hyper-V and the Hypervisor Platform for Windows.5. Select OK.Your system will now begin installing Hyper-V in the background; it may be necessary to reboot a few times until everything is properly configured. Don't hold your breath for a notification or anything! Verify that Hyper-V is installed successfully on your machine by running the following command as Administrator in PowerShell:Get-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Hyper-VOnce the state is shown as Enabled for above command in Power shell, we are good to go.Step 2: Download Docker for Windows and install it.Kubernetes is a container orchestration system built on top of Docker. It is essentially just a tool for communicating with Docker containers and managing everything at an enterprise level. Simply go to install Docker and click to Get Docker Desktop for Windows (stable).Windows users can use Docker Desktop.Docker Desktop for Windows is a version of Docker optimized for Windows 10. It's a native Windows application that makes developing, shipping, and running dockerized apps simple. Docker Desktop for Windows is the fastest and most reliable way to develop Docker apps on Windows, as it uses Windows-native Hyper-V virtualization and networking. Docker Desktop for Windows can run Docker containers on both Linux and Windows.Installation of Docker DesktopLet us take a look on the different steps involved in installing docker desktop.Double-click Docker for Windows Installer to run the installer.Docker starts automatically once the installation is complete. Docker is running and accessible from a terminal, as indicated by the whale in the notification area.Run Try out some Docker commands in a command-line terminal like PowerShell!  Run the Docker version to check the version.Run Docker run hello-world to verify that Docker can pull and run images.Boom!As long as the Docker Desktop for Windows app is running, Docker is accessible from any terminal. The Docker whale in the taskbar has a setting button that can be accessed from the UI.For a detailed step by step installation guide with screenshot, visit the blog - How to Install Docker on Windows, Mac, & Linux: A Step-By-Step GuideWARNING: FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS BELOW! If Docker was successfully installed but you can't find its tray icon, you'll need to restart your computer. Check the official troubleshooting guide here if the issue persists. Step 3: Install Kubernetes on Windows 10Docker includes a graphical user interface (GUI) tool that allows you to change some settings or install and enable Kubernetes.To install Kubernetes, simply follow the on-screen instructions on the screen:1. Right-click the Docker tray icon and select Properties.2. Select "Settings" from the drop-down menu.3. Select "Kubernetes" from the left panel.4. Check Enable Kubernetes and click "Apply"Docker will install additional packages and dependencies during the installation process. It may take between 5 and 10 minutes to install, depending on your Internet speed and PC performance. Wait until the message 'Installation complete!' appears on the screen. The Docker app can be used after Kubernetes has been installed to ensure that everything is working properly. Both icons at the bottom left will turn green if both services (Docker and Kubernetes) are running successfully and without errors.Example.Step 4: Install Kubernetes DashboardThe official web-based UI for managing Kubernetes resources is Kubernetes Dashboard. It isn't set up by default. Kubernetes applications can be easily deployed using the cli tool kubectl, which allows you to interact with your cloud and manage your Pods, Nodes, and Clusters. You can easily create or update Kubernetes resources by passing the apply argument followed by your YAML configuration file.Use the following commands to deploy and enable the Kubernetes Dashboard.1. Get the yaml configuration file from here.2. Use this to deploy it. kubectl apply -f .\recommended.yaml3. Run the following command to see if it's up and running.:kubectl.exe get -f .\recommended.yaml.txtStep 5: Access the dashboardThe dashboard can be accessed with tokens in two ways: the first is by using the default token created during Kubernetes installation, and the second (more secure) method is by creating users, giving them permissions, and then receiving the generated token. We'll go with the first option for the sake of simplicity.1. Run the following command PowerShell (not cmd)((kubectl -n kube-system describe secret default | Select-String "token:") -split " +")[1]2. Copy the generated token3. Runkubectl proxy.4. Open the following link on your browser: http://localhost:8001/api/v1/namespaces/kubernetes-dashboard/services/https:kubernetes-dashboard:/proxy/5. SelectToken & paste the generated token6. Sign InFinallyYou'll be able to see the dashboard and your cloud resources if everything is set up correctly. You can then do almost all of the "hard" work without having to deal with the CLI every time. You may occasionally get your hands dirty with the command line, but if you don't understand Docker and Kubernetes or don't have the time to manage your own cloud, it's better to stick with some PaaS providers that can be quite expensive.Kubernetes Uninstallation ProcessThe procedures for uninstalling cert-manager on Kubernetes are outlined below. Depending on which method you used to install cert-manager - static manifests or helm - you have two options.Warning: To uninstall cert-maneger, follow the same steps as you did to install it, but in reverse. Whether cert-manager was installed from static manifests or helm, deviating from the following process can result in issues and potentially broken states. To avoid this, make sure you follow the steps outlined below when uninstalling.Step 1: Before continuing, make sure that all user-created cert-manager resources have been deleted. You can check for any existing resources with the following command:$ kubectl get Issuers,ClusterIssuers,Certificates,CertificateRequests,Orders,Challenges --all-namespacesAfter you've deleted all of these resources, you can uninstall cert-manager by following the steps outlined in the installation guide.Step 2: Using regular manifests to uninstall.Uninstalling from a regular manifest installation is as simple as reversing the installation process and using the delete command.kubectl.2. Delete the installation manifests using a link to your currently running version vX.Y. Z like so:$ kubectl delete -f https://github.com/jetstack/cert-manager/releases/download/vX.Y.Z/cert-manager.yamlStep 3: Uninstalling with Helm.1. Uninstalling cert-manager from a Helm installation is as simple as reversing the installation process and using the delete command on both the server and the client. kubectl and helm.$ helm --namespace cert-manager delete cert-manager2. Next, delete the cert-manager namespace:$ kubectl delete namespace cert-manager3. Finally, delete the cert-manger CustomResourceDefinitions using the link to the version vX.Y.Z you installed:$ kubectl delete -f https://github.com/jetstack/cert-manager/releases/download/vX.Y.Z/cert-manager.crds.yamlThe namespace is in the process of being terminated.The namespace may become stuck in a terminating state if it is marked for deletion without first deleting the cert-manager installation. This is usually because the APIService resource is still present, but the webhook is no longer active and thus no longer reachable.4. To fix this, make sure you ran the above commands correctly, and if you're still having problems, run:$ kubectl delete apiservice v1beta1.ConclusionIn this tutorial, we have explained in detail how to install Kubernetes with Hyper-V. Also, we have tackled what requirements we need, both in terms of the software and hardware. We have explained how to install Hyper-V and Docker on Windows 10.   It is important to note that the fundamental difference between Kubernetes and Docker is that Kubernetes is meant to run across a cluster and Docker is meant to run through nodes.   Kubernetes is also more extensive than Docker Swarm and is meant to coordinate a cluster of nodes at scale in production in an efficient manner. Each software is crucial to having a smooth installation process.   We finally looked at how to install and uninstall Kubernetes.
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How To Install Jenkins on Ubuntu

Jenkins is a Java-built open-source Continuous Integration (CI) and CD platform. Basically, Jenkins builds software projects, checks and deploys them. This is one of the most practical programming tools you can master, and today we will show you how Jenkins is installed on Ubuntu 18.04. Use this powerful tool to activate your VPS server!Jenkins is loved by teams of all sizes, for different language projects like Java, Ruby, Dot Net, PHP etc. Jenkins is a platform that is autonomous, and can be used on Windows, Linux or any other operating system.  Prerequisites Hardware Requirements: RAM- 4 GB (Recommended) Storage- more than 50 GB of Hard Disk Space (Recommended)        Software Requirements: Java: Java Development Kit (JDK) or Java Runtime Environment (JRE).  Web Browser: Any browser such as Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Microsoft Edge. Operating System: An Ubuntu 18.04 server installed with a non-root sudo user and firewall. For help in the planning of production capability of a Jenkins installation see Choosing the right hardware for Masters. Why Use Jenkins? You need to consider continuous integration (CI) and continuous delivery (CD) to understand Jenkins: Continuous integration – the practice of continuous production combined with the main industry.  Continuous delivery – the code is constantly delivered to an area after the code is ready for delivery. It could be for production or staging. The commodity is supplied to a consumer base that can provide QA or inspection by customers. Developers update the code regularly in the shared repository (such as GitHub or TFS). Improvements made in the source code are made at the end of the day, making it difficult to identify the errors. So, Jenkins is used here. Once a developer changes the repository, Jenkins will automatically enable the build and immediately warn you in the event of an error (Continuous Integration CI). Installation Procedure: Step 1: Install Java Skip to the next section if you have Java already installed on your system. To check, please run the following command in the terminal: java --version Jenkins needs Java for running, but it doesn't include certain distributions by default, and Java versions of Jenkins are incompatible. Multiple Java implementations are available to you. OpenJDK is currently the most popular one, which we will use in this guide. Being an open-source Java application, Jenkins requires the installation of OpenJDK 8 on your system. The apt repositories can directly access OpenJDK 8. The installation of OpenJDK from standard repositories is recommended. Open and enter the following in the terminal window: $ sudo apt update  $ sudo apt install openjdk-8-jdk The download and installation will be requested. Press the "Y" button and press the Enter button to finish the process. Java 8 will be installed on your system. We are ready to download Jenkins package now as we have our requirements ready! Step 2: Install Jenkins The default Ubuntu packages for Jenkins are always behind the current version of the project itself. You may use the project-maintained packages to install Jenkins to take advantage of the newest patches and features. 1. add the framework repository key: $ wget -q -O - https://pkg.jenkins.io/debian-stable/jenkins.io.key | sudo apt-key add  The device returns OK when the key is inserted. 2. Next, link the repository of Debian packages to the sources.list of the server: $ sudo sh -c 'echo deb http://pkg.jenkins.io/debian-stable binary/ > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/jenkins.list' 3. When both are in place, upgrade to apt to use the new repository: $ sudo apt update 4. Install Jenkins: $ sudo apt install jenkins Now we're going to start the Jenkins server, as Jenkins and its dependencies are in place. Step 3: Start Jenkins 1. You can start Jenkins using systemctl: $ sudo systemctl start jenkins 2. As systemctl does not display performance, you can use the status command to check that Jenkins has successfully launched: $ sudo systemctl status jenkinsIf all went well, the start of the performance should demonstrate that the service is active and ready to boot: Output: jenkins.service - LSB: Start Jenkins at boot time     Loaded: loaded (/etc/init.d/jenkins; generated)     Active: active (exited) since Sat 2021-04-17 00:34:17 IST; 26s ago       Docs: man:systemd-sysv-generator(8)    Process: 17609 ExecStart=/etc/init.d/jenkins start (code=exited, status=0/SUCC As Jenkins is running, so adjust the firewall rules to complete our further setup of Jenkins from the web browser. Step 4: Opening the Firewall 1. Jenkins works by default on port 8080, so let's open the port with ufw: $ sudo ufw allow 8080  2. Check ufw’s status: $ sudo ufw status You will see that traffic from anywhere is permitted to port 8080. Output: Status: active  To                         Action      From  --                         ------      ----  8000                       ALLOW       Anywhere                    CUPS                       ALLOW       Anywhere                    27017                      ALLOW       Anywhere                    27017                      ALLOW       192.168.1.10                8080                       ALLOW       Anywhere                    8000 (v6)                  ALLOW       Anywhere (v6)               CUPS (v6)                  ALLOW       Anywhere (v6)               27017 (v6)                 ALLOW       Anywhere (v6)               8080 (v6)                  ALLOW       Anywhere (v6) 3. If the firewall is inactive, the following commands will allow OpenSSH and turn it back on: $ sudo ufw allow OpenSSH  $ sudo ufw enable We can finish the initial configuration with Jenkins installed and our firewall configured. Note: If you decide to continue to use Jenkins, use a Nginx Reverse Proxy at Ubuntu 18.04 to configure Jenkins with SSL when your exploration has been completed to protect your passwords and any sensitive system or product information sent between the machine and the server in plain text. Step 5: Setting Up Jenkins 1. To set up installation, visit Jenkins on its default 8080 port with your server domain name or IP address: http://your_server_ip_or_domain:8080 You should see the Unlock Jenkins screen, which displays the initial password's location:2. You can use the cat command to display the password: $ sudo cat /var/lib/jenkins/secrets/initialAdminPassword 3. Copy the alphanumeric terminal 32-character password and paste into the Administrator Password field, then click Continue. Output: 0aaaf00d9afe48e5b7f2a494d1881326 The following screen shows the ability to install or select certain plugins: 4. We will click on the option to install proposed plugins to start the installation process immediately. 5. When the installation is done, the first administrative user will be prompted. You can save this step and use your initial password to continue as an Admin. However, we will take some time to create the user. The Jenkins default server is NOT encrypted to prevent data from being protected. Use the Nginx Reverse Proxy on Ubuntu 18.04 to configure Jenkins with SSL. This protects the information of users and builds transmitted through the web interface. 6. You will see a configuration instance page, which asks you to confirm your Jenkins instance's URL of choice. Confirm either your server's domain name or the IP address of your server.  7. Click Save and Finish once you have confirmed the relevant information. A confirmation page will show you that "Jenkins is ready!"  Hit Start using Jenkins button and it will take you to the Jenkins dashboard.  Congratulations! You have completed the installation of Jenkins. Step 6: Creation of New Build Jobs in Jenkins: The freestyle job is a highly versatile and user-friendly choice. It's easy to set up and many of its options appear in many other build jobs. For all projects, you can use it. Follow the following steps: You have to login to your Jenkins Dashboard by visiting2) Create New item: Click on the New Item on the left-hand side of the dashboard.3) Fill the project description: You can enter the job details as per your need.4) Source Code Management: Under source code management, enter the repository URL.You can also use a Local repository. 5) Build Environment: Now in the Build section, Click on the “Add build Setup” Select "Execute Windows batch command".Now, add the java commands. In this article, we have used javac HelloWorld.java and java HelloWorld.   6) Save the project: Click Apply and save the project. 7) Build Source Code and check its status: Click on “Build Now” on the left-hand side of the screen to create the source code. 8) Console Output: Select the build number and click on “Console Output” to check the status of the build run. When it shows success, it means that we have successfully run the HelloWorld program from the cGitHub Repository. In case of failure, you can check the job logs by clicking on failure icon and debug the root cause.Uninstall Jenkins Follow the instructions to uninstall Jenkins: $ sudo apt-get remove jenkins Uninstall Jenkins: $ sudo apt-get remove --auto-remove jenkins Purging your data: $ sudo apt-get purge jenkins or you can use: $ sudo apt-get purge --auto-remove jenkins Conclusion: Installing Jenkins on Ubuntu is really that easy. Jenkins has a low learning curve and so you can start to work with it as quickly as possible. In the above article we have learned how to install Jenkins in an Ubuntu machine where all the steps are explained clearly. In case you want to learn more about the core concepts of Jenkins Jobs, Pipelines, Distributed System, Plugins, and how to use Jenkins in depth you can enroll for our course Jenkins Certification Course. 
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How To Install Jenkins on Ubuntu

Jenkins is a Java-built open-source Continuous In... Read More

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