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Make Your Agile ‘WAIT’ Visible & Worthwhile

Waiting for something or someone is one of the most annoying things in life. I’m sure all of you have faced such situation in a real life. How about waiting nervously till your examination results arrive? How about waiting for your fiancé or fiancée to come and meet you? And how about waiting till you get your increment or promotion? Strenuous and frustrating isn’t it? It just eats you away minute-by-minute, day-by-day fretting away at what might just be a risky unknown.Well, waiting is a common thing. May it be personal life or even when executing software development projects. This is no difference even in a change-driven Agile project. In Agile terms, waiting is the result of an impediment of any shape or form.So what is an impediment?The dictionary definition of an impediment is ‘a hindrance or an obstruction to doing something’. In Agile terms, an impediment is ‘anything that is slowing down the team’. In PMP terms an impediment is ‘any kind of issue’. An impediment simply makes an Agile team wait!!So, what can make an Agile team wait?An Agile team may end up waiting forInformationResources; human or non-humanAnother task or a featureAdviceFeedbackTools or TechnologyManagement decisions, or lack of itWork environment itselfAbove are just some reasons while a team may get blocked from achieving their objectives. It will stop them from getting things ‘Done’ which finally affects their velocity.So what should you do with the thing that makes you wait? Let’s take a look at it next!!Making the ‘wait’ visibleA core concept in Agile is to make everything transparent and visible. We achieve this mainly by showing things in the information radiator (or our scrum board) or by discussing things during the scrum ceremonies. Here are a few things that you can do to make the ‘wait’ visible.Add a ‘waiting’ column to your scrum board – Move the tasks or user stories that are blocked to a swimlane named ‘waiting’ and make it visible for everyone as soon as you identify it. Don’t wait!!The swimlane alone does not suffice. Add some more notes (in coloured sticky notes or cards) with information such as why it is blocked, who are you waiting for, what are you waiting for, when do you expect a resolution, how the impediment will be removed, and what is the impact etc.Notify the relevant stakeholders about the impediment – Your scrum master is your ‘Protector’. Make him aware of all your impediments as soon as you identify it. Bring it up during the immediate daily scrum meeting so that the scrum master can identify a way forward and facilitate a process to resolve the impedimentMaking the ‘wait’ worthwhileIt’s all good to identify and highlight impediments as explained above. Action or steps to find solutions for these impediments will take some time. In software development, a minute wasted may result in delays in project timelines that may have detrimental consequences on time, cost, and scope. So, how can you make the wait worthwhile?The team members blocked must make maximum use out of the waiting time. Below are some of the paths that he or she can tread while ‘waiting’.Add more information as to why you are waiting. Information and collaboration is the key to resolving issues. The more guidance and information that can be provided on the issue itself will make it easier for the assignee to resolve that blocker.Move on to another task – If there is nothing else to do on the item blocked then just move on and keep the flow of other tasks going. Agile stresses on the progress of stories and tasks in a sprint on a daily basis and you will achieve this only by working on the other tasks.Help others or get help – Don’t be shy!! Collaboration and communication is the key in Agile. Work with team members to either solve the issue or help them resolve the blocker.Research on the root cause of the blocker or on a resolution for the impediment. Agile teams need to be innovative and this is the best way of making use of ‘waiting time’ judiciouslyThe following video will give you a clear picture of the impediments encountered by Agile and Scrum teams.ConclusionImpediments and wait is an inevitable thing in Agile projects. It is up to the team members to identify the best way to identify, record, manage, update and resolve impediments. Agile principles and values provides guidance on what needs to happen but it is up to the team to ascertain what works well for the team while ‘waiting’.So, happy waiting to you!!
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Make Your Agile ‘WAIT’ Visible & Worthwhile

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Make Your Agile ‘WAIT’ Visible & Worthwhile

Waiting for something or someone is one of the most annoying things in life. I’m sure all of you have faced such situation in a real life. How about waiting nervously till your examination results arrive? How about waiting for your fiancé or fiancée to come and meet you? And how about waiting till you get your increment or promotion? Strenuous and frustrating isn’t it? It just eats you away minute-by-minute, day-by-day fretting away at what might just be a risky unknown.

Well, waiting is a common thing. May it be personal life or even when executing software development projects. This is no difference even in a change-driven Agile project. In Agile terms, waiting is the result of an impediment of any shape or form.

So what is an impediment?
Impediment in Agile TermsThe dictionary definition of an impediment is ‘a hindrance or an obstruction to doing something’. In Agile terms, an impediment is ‘anything that is slowing down the team’. In PMP terms an impediment is ‘any kind of issue’. An impediment simply makes an Agile team wait!!

So, what can make an Agile team wait?

An Agile team may end up waiting for

  • Information
  • Resources; human or non-human
  • Another task or a feature
  • Advice
  • Feedback
  • Tools or Technology
  • Management decisions, or lack of it
  • Work environment itself

Above are just some reasons while a team may get blocked from achieving their objectives. It will stop them from getting things ‘Done’ which finally affects their velocity.

So what should you do with the thing that makes you wait? Let’s take a look at it next!!

Making the ‘wait’ visible

A core concept in Agile is to make everything transparent and visible. We achieve this mainly by showing things in the information radiator (or our scrum board) or by discussing things during the scrum ceremonies. Here are a few things that you can do to make the ‘wait’ visible.

  • Add a ‘waiting’ column to your scrum board – Move the tasks or user stories that are blocked to a swimlane named ‘waiting’ and make it visible for everyone as soon as you identify it. Don’t wait!!
    Add a ‘waiting’ column to your scrum board
  • The swimlane alone does not suffice. Add some more notes (in coloured sticky notes or cards) with information such as why it is blocked, who are you waiting for, what are you waiting for, when do you expect a resolution, how the impediment will be removed, and what is the impact etc.
  • Notify the relevant stakeholders about the impediment – Your scrum master is your ‘Protector’. Make him aware of all your impediments as soon as you identify it. Bring it up during the immediate daily scrum meeting so that the scrum master can identify a way forward and facilitate a process to resolve the impediment

Making the ‘wait’ worthwhile

It’s all good to identify and highlight impediments as explained above. Action or steps to find solutions for these impediments will take some time. In software development, a minute wasted may result in delays in project timelines that may have detrimental consequences on time, cost, and scope. So, how can you make the wait worthwhile?
Making the ‘wait’ worthwhileThe team members blocked must make maximum use out of the waiting time. Below are some of the paths that he or she can tread while ‘waiting’.

  • Add more information as to why you are waiting. Information and collaboration is the key to resolving issues. The more guidance and information that can be provided on the issue itself will make it easier for the assignee to resolve that blocker.
  • Move on to another task – If there is nothing else to do on the item blocked then just move on and keep the flow of other tasks going. Agile stresses on the progress of stories and tasks in a sprint on a daily basis and you will achieve this only by working on the other tasks.
  • Help others or get help – Don’t be shy!! Collaboration and communication is the key in Agile. Work with team members to either solve the issue or help them resolve the blocker.
  • Research on the root cause of the blocker or on a resolution for the impediment. Agile teams need to be innovative and this is the best way of making use of ‘waiting time’ judiciously

The following video will give you a clear picture of the impediments encountered by Agile and Scrum teams.

Conclusion
Impediments and wait is an inevitable thing in Agile projects. It is up to the team members to identify the best way to identify, record, manage, update and resolve impediments. Agile principles and values provides guidance on what needs to happen but it is up to the team to ascertain what works well for the team while ‘waiting’.

So, happy waiting to you!!

Rumesh

Rumesh Wijetunge

Chief Innovation Officer - Zaizi Limited, Chief Operating Officer - LearntIn (Pvt) Ltd., Director /

Rumesh is an IT business leader with over 12 years of industry experience as a business analyst and project manager. He is currently the CIO of Zaizi Limited, a UK based data management company heading the operations in Sri Lanka, the COO of LearntIn, a global training institute based in Sri Lanka and is also a lecturer / trainer at multiple private universities on management, IT, business analysis and project management subjects. He is the current president of the IIBA Sri Lanka chapter and is one of the most qualified and sought after trainers in Sri Lanka. Refer his LinkedIn profile for more details and to see more articles he has written on linkedin

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Physically attending a classroom course is not required.Scrum.org offers “open assessments” which are interesting for anyone to validate your Scrum knowledge, regardless of if you intend to get certified or not.To know more about various Agile and Scrum certifications and paths to learning these certifications to make a career move, you can refer certification pathway.Choosing between the best Scrum Master Certifications: CSM®️ vs PSM™ Agile and Scrum are today’s latest trends. Not only IT-based organizations but also non-IT organizations hire individuals who know the concepts of Scrum framework and its applications. Scrum is the Agile framework, focuses on the complex projects.Initially, the Scrum framework was used for software development, but today it is used as any other projects to get the fastest results. So, there is a rising demand for Agile-Scrum professionals in the organizations.CSM®️ and PSM™  are two major Scrum Master certifications. CSM®️ stands for Certified Scrum Master. CSM®️ is a certification issued by the Scrum Alliance. CSM®️ is a first (entry-level) certification for the Scrum Master. PSM™  stands for Professional Scrum Master. PSM™  is a certification issued by Scrum.org. PSM™  and PSM™  both are the entry-level certifications for the Scrum Master.    PSM™  by Scrum.org has a different approach than CSM®️ by Scrum Alliance in the following ways:- According to Scrum.org, there's no need to attend a class, to be able to take an online test to get certified. A practice assessment is available online, called "Scrum Open"- According to Scrum.org, a certification is a proof of knowledge and therefore has no certification dateLet’s see the differences between the CSM®️ and PSM™  in the tabular form.Certified Scrum Master (CSM®️)FeaturesProfessional Scrum Master (PSM™)50 multiple-choice questions, usually with four possible answersExam PatternNumber of Questions: 80Format: Multiple Choice, Multiple Answer and True/FalsePassing score: minimum 69%Passing gradePassing score: minimum 85%The test is taken anytime after attending the courseThere's no time limitExam durationTime limit: 60 minutesEvery 2 yearsCertification renewal durationNo expiration (Lifetime certification)Fee: $1295 per attemptCertification costFee: $150 per attemptThere's no practice exam available. In general, after attending and learning during a two-day CSM course, you should be able to pass the exam without issues.Level of the examDifficulty: Intermediate$119,040  per yearSalary$100,500 per yearFinal ThoughtA search on “Scrum Master”, in the job title with as prerequisite “Certified Scrum Master” gives more than 1000 jobs results. If you want to get an idea what companies and organizations ask in terms of Certified Scrum Master Course, you can have a look at the AgileCareers website (by Scrum Alliance). (there are mainly USA based jobs listed)This is all about the comparison between the CSM®️ and PSM™  and various certifying bodies like Scrum Alliance and Scrum.org that offer these certifications.In the end, knowledge matters whether it is CSM®️ or PSM™  certification. Both certificates have the same value in the job market. Also, both the programs are highly compatible. It is very crucial what you earned during the certification process and the trainer will definitely help you to make the difference there.
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