Search

One Simple Hack to do Business Case Writing like a Pro

Whether you are a start-up or well-settled business establishment, there is one common phase you have to go through before starting out any project i.e. Business Case Writing. It is an immensely important step to be taken in the very early stages of a project that highlights all the necessary resources to be involved, their cost and management, backup resources and most importantly the timeline. Also, the expected benefits and overall influence on business make a part of an effective business case. “A business case captures the reasoning for initiating a project or task.” This is how Wikipedia says it crisp and clear about the business case. It is usually proposed as a well-drafted document, but nowadays, it is often proposed as presentations. An impressive business case is the one that includes both quantifiable and non-quantifiable aspects of a project in absolute terms.  Why Writing A Business Case Is Important? A business case holds significance because it helps to evaluate the value of a project and its respective returns for a company in a concise manner. Moreover, it outlines the performance indicators for the entire workforce involved in a particular project. This further helps decision-making bodies to recognize individual potential while pushing their limits to a whole new level with extended responsibilities on the table. With a well-defined business case, it becomes quite easy to have an idea about:  Awaiting business opportunities (while some refer them as problems)  Positive outcomes   Risks or setbacks   Total costs to be incurred (including all the investments and appraisals)  Turn Around Time  Backups or failure-escapes, and  The undefined capability of the workforce to deliver expected results. A document so critical obviously needs great precision to work with. It won’t be an easy task. And, let’s face it, sometimes even experienced professionals fail to do business case writing aptly.  This blog will reveal that one simple hack – which will help you through this significant phase like a pro. The hack is to break down the entire case into seven important questions including: Q1: Why the project worth making an investment? You should gather enough details and information about the project, and present it in simple and easy-to-comprehend language so that every other member of the decision-making committee can understand why you are proposing that project. Q2: What objective will the project serve to the organization? With anything proposed in a business establishment, there is a need to brief the future state that a particular project or step is going to bring. Make sure you define the project objective clearly to avoid any hassles in later phases. Q3: How the project will improve the current situation of your organization? Next, in the queue comes a compelling argument about the benefits of the project. Make your draft more convincing using graphical representations showing the current scenario and the improvements everyone can expect in the near future. Q4: What are the different possibilities to execute the project? Now that everyone is convinced about the outcomes of the project, the next question lies afore you is HOW. You have to give a detailed presentation underlining all the possible options that can be looked upon for successful completion of the project. Q5: What are the parameters to measure the success ratio? Once a project is started, it becomes pivotal to define certain parameters to help measuring the success rate. This helps you to know whether you are moving ahead in right direction or there is a need to switch to some other alternative to reach paramount. Q6: What external resources will be required for project success? It is often a case that your organization may not have adequate resources required for the project execution. Be sure you have briefed all such external resources well in advance so to ensure their availability at the time of need. Q7: How much time will be required and what next it triggers? Last but not the least; you have to come up with a specified range of time for your project. As this helps in distribution of resources and making cost estimations for the additional resources required.  Additionally, you should define the next steps once the project is completed. After all, growth is a continuous process. You just cannot stop after setting just one milestone. Keep moving, keep setting new milestones. Once you will be able to answer these seven questions in your with complete consideration, Congratulations! You did your business case writing task well. Here're some best tips to improve business writing skills  

One Simple Hack to do Business Case Writing like a Pro

262
One Simple Hack to do Business Case Writing like a Pro

Whether you are a start-up or well-settled business establishment, there is one common phase you have to go through before starting out any project i.e. Business Case Writing.

It is an immensely important step to be taken in the very early stages of a project that highlights all the necessary resources to be involved, their cost and management, backup resources and most importantly the timeline. Also, the expected benefits and overall influence on business make a part of an effective business case.

“A business case captures the reasoning for initiating a project or task.”

This is how Wikipedia says it crisp and clear about the business case. It is usually proposed as a well-drafted document, but nowadays, it is often proposed as presentations.

An impressive business case is the one that includes both quantifiable and non-quantifiable aspects of a project in absolute terms. 

Why Writing A Business Case Is Important?

A business case holds significance because it helps to evaluate the value of a project and its respective returns for a company in a concise manner. Moreover, it outlines the performance indicators for the entire workforce involved in a particular project. This further helps decision-making bodies to recognize individual potential while pushing their limits to a whole new level with extended responsibilities on the table.

With a well-defined business case, it becomes quite easy to have an idea about:

  •  Awaiting business opportunities (while some refer them as problems)
  •  Positive outcomes 
  •  Risks or setbacks 
  •  Total costs to be incurred (including all the investments and appraisals)
  •  Turn Around Time
  •  Backups or failure-escapes, and
  •  The undefined capability of the workforce to deliver expected results.

A document so critical obviously needs great precision to work with. It won’t be an easy task. And, let’s face it, sometimes even experienced professionals fail to do business case writing aptly. 

This blog will reveal that one simple hack – which will help you through this significant phase like a pro.

The hack is to break down the entire case into seven important questions including:

Q1: Why the project worth making an investment?
You should gather enough details and information about the project, and present it in simple and easy-to-comprehend language so that every other member of the decision-making committee can understand why you are proposing that project.

Q2: What objective will the project serve to the organization?
With anything proposed in a business establishment, there is a need to brief the future state that a particular project or step is going to bring. Make sure you define the project objective clearly to avoid any hassles in later phases.

Q3: How the project will improve the current situation of your organization?
Next, in the queue comes a compelling argument about the benefits of the project. Make your draft more convincing using graphical representations showing the current scenario and the improvements everyone can expect in the near future.

Q4: What are the different possibilities to execute the project?
Now that everyone is convinced about the outcomes of the project, the next question lies afore you is HOW. You have to give a detailed presentation underlining all the possible options that can be looked upon for successful completion of the project.

Q5: What are the parameters to measure the success ratio?
Once a project is started, it becomes pivotal to define certain parameters to help measuring the success rate. This helps you to know whether you are moving ahead in right direction or there is a need to switch to some other alternative to reach paramount.

Q6: What external resources will be required for project success?
It is often a case that your organization may not have adequate resources required for the project execution. Be sure you have briefed all such external resources well in advance so to ensure their availability at the time of need.

Q7: How much time will be required and what next it triggers?
Last but not the least; you have to come up with a specified range of time for your project. As this helps in distribution of resources and making cost estimations for the additional resources required. 
Additionally, you should define the next steps once the project is completed. After all, growth is a continuous process. You just cannot stop after setting just one milestone. Keep moving, keep setting new milestones.

Once you will be able to answer these seven questions in your with complete consideration, Congratulations! You did your business case writing task well.

Here're some best tips to improve business writing skills


 

Priyanka

Priyanka Arora

Blog Author

Priyanka Arora is a professional content writer who specializes in business-class writing. Her overall work experience includes writing quality product descriptions, articles and blogs, sales emails, landing Pages, website content, case Studies, newsletters, press releases and product reviews .

Join the Discussion

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Suggested Blogs

BCW: The Nuts and Bolts of Preparing a Business Case

Every business needs a change in order to boost its productivity and performance. Getting quality work or projects from clients will play a major role in achieving this. A business would need to rake in stakeholders if it wants to bring about a substantial change. As there are many crucial things that are involved you won’t be able to get these stakeholders very easily. In such a situation, a business case plays its part. The business case is a document that will allow you to have an effective communication and convince the people that matter. These people called the stakeholders will deeply go through this document before they decide to finally buy-in. The business case will consist of all the valid reasons that will persuade a key person to support a project. The document will explain in details the aftermaths of a decision that is related to your business. Starting from the initial stage where all the important groundwork is done to finally implementing the whole process. By going through the business case a stakeholder can have a clear idea as to whether should buy-in or not. Qualities an Efficient Business Case The main purpose of a business case is to have an impact on the person who reads it. So, if you are among those who is planning to write one for your business, have a look at the below points. These points will enable you to draft an effective business case for your organization. Firstly, you need to do an in-depth research on all the possible effects on your business. This will also include the costs and the expected benefits. You must have a valid reason for all the points that you have put forward in the document. There must be a link between the costs incurred and what will be the impact of it on the benefits. All the possible outcomes that range from the positive and the negative issues should be presented in an effective manner. The business case that you present must be able to summarize all the important points and provide a proper judgment or verdict. Writing A Business Case Writing a business case is a job that cannot be performed by a single person. It’s a collective effort of an entire team. The requirement of a team is necessary due to the large amount of information that is needed to write the case. The team will have to conduct meeting within themselves so that all the relevant information can be used judiciously. Enrolling into a Business Case Writing (BCW) training course will prove to be very beneficial for an individual. You will be able to learn about all the basic and the advanced level skills that are needed to write an effective case. Who All Are In A Team? A team will consist of professionals that are related to different domains like finance, human resources and IT. Based on their roles they will cater the required information. This will include data related to the value and cost of the effect of IT operations, contributions that can be made to escalate the expected benefits and the cost that is associated with hiring people. What Should a Business Case Comprise of?  You can write a business case in whatever format you want to. There is no fixed pattern that needs to be followed. However, by including the below-mentioned points you can make your business proposal an impactful one. Title Page Table of Contents Project Summary Mission Statement Objective of the Project Performance Measures Needs Assessment Technical Analysis Project Work Plan Financial Plan Conclusion A business case is an integral part of project management. It will define all the management factors and parameters that are included in a project. With the help of this, a project manager can analyze a project in a step-by-step manner. I would love to have your views about the article. Do let me know about them in the comments section below.
13319
BCW: The Nuts and Bolts of Preparing a Business Ca...

Every business needs a change in order to boost it... Read More

Business Analysis For Practitioners – Business Management

We perform various Business Analysis tasks every day in our project management such as recognising business requirements, addressing business problems, building a business case, defining scope of solutions, and evaluating alternatives. In most cases, however, we do it offhanded without any prior formal training. By definition, Business Analysis practices identify business needs and recommend solutions to various business problems. The fundamental of Business Analysis includes requirement analysis techniques, stakeholder management, and communications. Business Analysis offers management the tools and techniques to explain why, what, and, how to deliver a product/service/change. Business Analysis is fundamental feature of any organisation. Transformation is inevitable, it can happen any time in the target market or the organisation you are working in. For your business to thrive, a proper analysis or the efficiency of your business should be conducted on a regular basis. This involves gathering information from various sources and analysing the information to provide a prediction of future trends. This will help devise ways for improving business strategies and operations. Analysis of Business provides stakeholders an understanding of the needs of the organisation. This helps teams make appropriate recommendations for those needs that ultimately enable the organisation progress and meet those needs. By achieving a thorough understanding of the needs, legitimate recommendations, and an acknowledgement of moving forward, Business Analysis provides teams with the ability map issues that do not facilitate the needs of the organisation. This map provides an outline of how the project will proceed, the teams can navigate to the desired state, keeping the stakeholders in the loop. Role of Practitioners in Business Analysis Earlier it was a common practice to refer the Business Analysis practitioners as ‘Requirement Analysts.’ But the scope of Business Analysis is so much more than that of the Requirement Analysis. Due to the unique nature of organisations, there are many different roles in a project that performs Business Analysis. According to the PMI’s Pulse of the Profession™ surveys, poor requirement practices are a leading cause of project failures. A practitioner helps tackle project-associated issues related with requirements and business analysis. The practitioners deliver value by understanding the organisation in terms of its people, processes, and technology by proposing recommendations, enabling the organisation to make informed decisions. The practitioners performing Business Analysis need to have the following skills: Business and industry knowledge Analytical skills Creative and critical thinking Learning and leadership skills Issue-management skills Decision making Influence and negotiation skills Problem solving Presentational and organisational skills Ability to work effectively in teams, including virtual teams Business Analysis Practitioners have the responsibilities spanning various knowledge areas of Business Analysis. Practitioners are accountable for determining which techniques to be applied in fulfilling those responsibilities addressed by each knowledge area. An individual needs to take into consideration the responsibilities described by these knowledge areas and decide whether to follow a change-driven approach such as Agile or a plan-driven approach (traditional waterfall model). The practitioner must understand that he too plays the role of a stakeholder with every project involvement. Some tasks such as attending meetings and taking notes might seem like a routine, but it is important that the practitioner understands tasks assigned to him. If the practitioner comes across an issue that has not been properly understood or accounted, then he/she has the responsibility to speak about it in the stakeholder meeting and take necessary measures to settle the issue, without letting any delays to occur, keeping the project on track. The practitioners are expected to evaluate how his responsibilities back up the overall effort, which ultimately helps achieve the agreed-upon set of needs. Benefits of Business Analysis to the Practitioners Helps you to develop proficiency in the principles and practices of business analysis. Demonstrates stakeholders, clients, suppliers, investors, and people of your organisation that you adhere to the industry-standard business-analysis practices. Makes you marketable with your participation in a recognised professional group. Gains you recognition among your professional peers and management. Advances your career potential as you gain the recognition of a professional business-analysis practitioner. Certification in Business Analysis improves your overall performance and widens market opportunities. According to the recent salary survey, Business Analysis practitioners have potentially higher income for being formally recognised as an experienced BA professional. Gives you a personal satisfaction of accomplishing a milestone in the BA careers. Helps you to ensure that you have constant growth, and remain up-to-date in the environment by accomplishing and maintaining the certification.
13323
Business Analysis For Practitioners – Bu...

We perform various Business Analysis tasks every d... Read More

Why CCBA Certification Is Must For Business Analysts

Professional business analysts, seeking formal certification of their business analysis skills, can pursue the Certification of Competency in Business Analysis (CCBA) course that is offered by the International Institute of Business Analysis (IIBA). Business analysts, who pursue the CCBA course, gain a certified recognition for their wide experience in the field of business analysis, and certify their ability to assume greater professional responsibility. About IIBA Founded in 2003, the IIBA serves the purpose of promoting the careers of business analysts around the world. This organization has over 100 chapters around the world and over 27,000 members. The IIBA created the Guide to the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge (BABOK guide), which defines the global standards for the practise of business analysis. It reflects the collective knowledge of the community of business analysts, along with the accepted business practises. The BABOK guide defines 6 knowledge areas, specific to the field of business analysis, namely: 1. Business analysis planning and monitoring, which detail the tasks of a business analyst, used for organizing and coordination. 2. Elicitation and collaboration, which detail the tasks required for preparing and conducting elicitation activities. 3. Requirements Life Cycle management, which detail the tasks required to manage requirement and design information through the entire life cycle. 4. Strategy Analysis, which provides details of the tasks required to identify the business needs within an organization, and devise the change strategy for business. 5. Requirement Analysis and Design definition, which detail the tasks used for requirement organization, model design, information verification and validation, solution options, and estimating the final business potential. 6. Solution Evaluation, which detail the tasks used for assessing the performance of a solution, along with recommendations for improvements. About the CCBA course Business analysts, seeking the CCBA certification course, can only qualify for the examination if they meet the following prerequisites: • Possess a work experience of at least 3750 hours (as stipulated in the BABOK guide) over the past 7 years. • Possess knowledge of all the 6 knowledge areas, defined in the BABOK guide. Of these 6, the applicant must be highly proficient in at least 2 of the areas (with over 900 hours of experience), and 500 hours of work experience in the remaining 4 knowledge areas. • A minimum of 21 hours in professional development in the past 4 years. • Must possess at least high school education or any equivalent certificate. • Professional reference letters from work manager, client, or a recipient of the Certified Business Analysis Professional (CBAP) certification. • Must agree to the CCBA code of ethical conduct and professional standards, which includes abiding by the exam testing rules and policies, prohibited conduct on the use of examination notes during the testing period, and maintaining the confidentiality of the CCBA exam contents. Available in English and Japanese languages, the CCBA examination is a computer-based test and can be taken from any part of the world. Benefits of the CCBA certification CCBA certification benefits offers not only to the business analyst (BA) being certified, but also to the BA’s organization. Listed below are the benefits for the business analyst: • Achieve certified competence in the principles and practices of business analysis. • Formal recognition of the professional competence of the business analyst. • Advances the career potential for the individual, as a recognized BA practitioner. • Higher range of employee remuneration due to the formal recognition of the business analyst. Business analysts with CCBA certification earn an average salary of USD 82,000, which is around 10% higher than business analysts with no certification. • Increase in professional opportunities for the certified BA. • Ensures a path of continuous improvement and upgrading in business analysis skills, in order to maintain the certification. • Improvement in individual performance and motivation. Additionally, here are some benefits for the organization, as well: • Advancing the careers of its staff including the business analyst. • Demonstration of industry-standard business analysis practices for the company customers and investors. • Effective implementation of business analysis skills (as outlined in the BABOK guide) within the organization. • Higher quality and efficiency of results by BA professionals, certified by an industry-accepted standard. • Commitment to the field of business analysis, and recognizing its importance in any business field. • Organizations, interested in Capability maturity model (CMM) integration, can benefit from the process improvement guidelines, as specified in the BABOK guide. These guidelines can upgrade the quality of projects from ad-hoc to managed levels. Advanced certification In addition to the CCBA certification, IIBA also offers the Certified Business Analysis Professional -CBAP certification to recognize and certify business analysts with 10 or more years of experience in this field. Eligibility for this certification includes 7,500 hours of work experience and high proficiency level in 4 of the 6 knowledge areas, as prescribed in the BABOK guide.
7040
Why CCBA Certification Is Must For Business Analys...

Professional business analysts, seeking formal cer... Read More

Useful links