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Remove Your Mental Block, Open Up and Think in Terms of PMBOK’s Best Practices

Excerpt from the personal blog of KnowledgeHut Faculty – Satya Narayan Dash, PMP Aswin Krishnan H is a proud PMP today. His success is not only due to sound preparation, but also handling stress during the exam. He names it as the “smile” factor, as he has told below so uniquely. Aswin was part of my class in May, 2015. He is a very lively person and participates fully. In fact, I remember few instances where his enthusiastic participation were bringing surprised looks on some faces. In my view, enthusiasm is a great quality in any team member. But, unfortunately, it is highly underrated. I believe, enthusiasm is contagious and brings many into the fold of discussion. He called me after he was certified and I asked – “How does it feel to be a PMP?” He had a sense of happiness, relief and immense satisfaction. Below, he has outlined his experience in preparing for it, going through the PMP program and finally cracking the exam. Go on and read his experience.                                                               ************************************* Introductory – Why I decided on it and how I started? I was motivated to do PMP as part of my job and wanted to understand properly the Best Practices and how to use them with confidence in day to day activities as far as possible. Three of my friends were equally interested in doing Industry standard certification and when we began our search we had PRINCE 2 and PMP in our mind. Finally, we settled down with PMP which has huge demand in any industry. We then started our search for Training provider, found that it’s the Coach and his approach that help a lot in this kind of Certification, though online and word of mouth reviews we shortlisted Knowledge Hut. One of my friend had a successful experience in securing his PMP within a month after training with the Coach Mr. Satya Narayan Dash, He was really impressed by his practical approach, knowledge and personal commitment. He has previously attended PMP trainings from various centers but never could understand the concepts clearly, and failed in the exam miserably. He came from Chennai to do the course in Bangalore, just for the Coach. My PMP Training Experience: The training was very precise and covered all Knowledge Areas from the 5 Process Groups: Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling and Closing. Satya was very kind and use to share his personal experiences with certain problems which helped to see insights of approaches and reason why or what suits best based on the PMBOK Guide. He always helped us think about all the process and why each Input is given and what is the output of each process and why it is important, often in many of the companies we don’t practically use all the process or tools but the Coach’s insight in all tools and approaches was very helpful in understanding the Input, Tools and Techniques and Output (ITTO) for each Processes. We had classes on Weekends, the coach was very punctual and kept his timelines very strict. He was very happy to help even after the classes and he would stay back for us even if it was raining just to make sure that we get the idea of what is happening or why it is happening, He use to explain ‘Change Request’ or ‘Deliverable’ Flow by drawing pictures as it goes through each processes. These insights really helped in understanding the concept and the interrelationship between each process and ITTO. In the entire class there was fun, all were active and were participating which the coach always managed to make it interactive. Lot of things we need an actual physical person to explain to us rather than just going through hours and hours of Videos. I understood that having a real person standing in front of us will build that physiological effect, which will help me learn more and get motivated easily. My Own Study: I really wanted to complete the exam within 2 months after completing the class, but due to personal commitments it got extended to 4 months. Every-day I use to spend at the least 2-3 hours reading PMBOK 5th Edition, Rita Mulchay. This really solidified my understanding that was gained in the Classroom training.  In the last one or two months I use to keep on giving Mock Tests in the early mornings (4 -7 am) and then review them after coming back from work (7 – 8 pm), I kept on giving mock test from various places and was not be very subjective in selecting the source for exam. I felt that giving these mock tests really boosted my confidence and triggered to schedule the exam. While doing the mock tests most of the times I was in panic and I didn’t read all options and selected the wrong one. Rita Mulcahy’s recommendation helped. I read the options from D to A instead of A to D. This really increased my hit percentage. My PMP Exam Experience: I became a member, filled in my application, got my references and waited for a week to get it approved; luckily it was not selected for any audit. That was half way done, second challenge was to schedule the exam. I kept on giving mock tests until I had the confidence and was hitting 75-80% in mock tests. This triggered me to schedule an exam, at this time I just wanted it to get over at the earliest; luckily I found a date that was within 10 days and scheduled the exam on that day. I had formulated this strategy of completing 70 questions in an hour so I will be done within 3 hours at the max (200 questions) this I kept on applying while taking the mock tests and this strategy was quiet successful for me. On the Test day, I was faced with a flurry of Mathematical questions (20-25) from Question No#1 with all confusing stuffs and very wordy; I was very stressed, then I remember reading somewhere that even if you are stressed and if you manage to keep a smile on your face you can beat the stress. I applied the same and was able to get over the initial surprises in the exam. There were lots of situational questions, I was confused in lots of places; I marked them and kept on moving forward without worrying about the lengthy or wordy questions and kept on answering whichever I could. Finally, by the time I was done with 200 questions, it was like 2:30 hours; so I went back and selected all the unanswered and marked ones and slowly went through each one of them, now ‘smile’ factor worked and was able to easily and clearly read the questions and answer them. I completed all left outs within 45 minutes. Now I started reviewing again from beginning and just kept on speed reading questions and selected answers just to make sure that I did them correctly. The PMP really puts a toll on you with all sorts of Mathematical, Situational, and Tricky Questions, the initial impact of the questions is really intended to create stress, if you overcome that then you would be able to score very easily. During the exam I read the answers from D to A instead of A to D, I found this to be very helpful against panic answering due to stress. Suggestions for PMP Aspirants: – Dos Please read PMBOK at the least twice, it is very helpful and answer to PMBOK and not to your personal experiences. Please take any book like Rita or Andy Crowe or Head First and complete them once before kick starting the mock tests. Please keep a smile on your face, even though you are stressed, this will help relieve stress and get back to your senses while taking test, if you are in panic answering mode read the answers from D to A than from A to D this will improve your hit rate, these helped me. Please do take 10-15 mock tests before attempting the exam, this really helped me understand where I stand and what my weakness is and helped to motivate and improve. Real life PM experience helps a lot while answering these questions during the exam. – Don’ts Don’t waste time prolonging the exam, use your time wisely and complete it at the earliest. Having too many materials won’t help as you will be confused when to complete them, don’t get overburdened. Conclusion: After earning PMP I am much relived, I can see the fruits of hard work getting paid off. Whenever you say that you are PMP, there is a peer respect, because all of them know how much committed you need to be to earn this prestigious qualification. I now see what things at work do work and what not and how they are interrelated. PMP is not just a one-time process, you can apply this leanings in each every aspect of your life which you are doing unconsciously. Finally If I CAN DO IT ANY ONE CAN. You just need to remove the mental block and open up and think more in terms with best practices put forward by PMBOK, and your personal commitment. Brief Profile:  I am Aswin Krishnan H and am a Project Manager with Hewlett-Packard, India. I have 9 years of experience in Telecom, Retail and Security Domain with .NET Platform.                                                               ******************************   Aswin’s online PMP credential is available at PMI’s online credential registry. I am thankful to Aswin for sharing his journey in achieving the PMP certification. I believe it will help you – the PMP aspirant – to have your own. This article was originally published on managementyogi.blogspot.in

Remove Your Mental Block, Open Up and Think in Terms of PMBOK’s Best Practices

487
Remove Your Mental Block, Open Up and Think in Terms of PMBOK’s Best Practices

Excerpt from the personal blog of KnowledgeHut Faculty – Satya Narayan Dash, PMP

Aswin Krishnan H is a proud PMP today. His success is not only due to sound preparation, but also handling stress during the exam. He names it as the “smile” factor, as he has told below so uniquely.

Aswin was part of my class in May, 2015. He is a very lively person and participates fully. In fact, I remember few instances where his enthusiastic participation were bringing surprised looks on some faces. In my view, enthusiasm is a great quality in any team member. But, unfortunately, it is highly underrated. I believe, enthusiasm is contagious and brings many into the fold of discussion. He called me after he was certified and I asked – “How does it feel to be a PMP?” He had a sense of happiness, relief and immense satisfaction.

Below, he has outlined his experience in preparing for it, going through the PMP program and finally cracking the exam. Go on and read his experience.

                                                              *************************************

Introductory – Why I decided on it and how I started?

I was motivated to do PMP as part of my job and wanted to understand properly the Best Practices and how to use them with confidence in day to day activities as far as possible.

Three of my friends were equally interested in doing Industry standard certification and when we began our search we had PRINCE 2 and PMP in our mind. Finally, we settled down with PMP which has huge demand in any industry. We then started our search for Training provider, found that it’s the Coach and his approach that help a lot in this kind of Certification, though online and word of mouth reviews we shortlisted Knowledge Hut.

One of my friend had a successful experience in securing his PMP within a month after training with the Coach Mr. Satya Narayan Dash, He was really impressed by his practical approach, knowledge and personal commitment. He has previously attended PMP trainings from various centers but never could understand the concepts clearly, and failed in the exam miserably. He came from Chennai to do the course in Bangalore, just for the Coach.

My PMP Training Experience:

The training was very precise and covered all Knowledge Areas from the 5 Process Groups: Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling and Closing. Satya was very kind and use to share his personal experiences with certain problems which helped to see insights of approaches and reason why or what suits best based on the PMBOK Guide. He always helped us think about all the process and why each Input is given and what is the output of each process and why it is important, often in many of the companies we don’t practically use all the process or tools but the Coach’s insight in all tools and approaches was very helpful in understanding the Input, Tools and Techniques and Output (ITTO) for each Processes.

We had classes on Weekends, the coach was very punctual and kept his timelines very strict. He was very happy to help even after the classes and he would stay back for us even if it was raining just to make sure that we get the idea of what is happening or why it is happening, He use to explain ‘Change Request’ or ‘Deliverable’ Flow by drawing pictures as it goes through each processes. These insights really helped in understanding the concept and the interrelationship between each process and ITTO.

In the entire class there was fun, all were active and were participating which the coach always managed to make it interactive. Lot of things we need an actual physical person to explain to us rather than just going through hours and hours of Videos. I understood that having a real person standing in front of us will build that physiological effect, which will help me learn more and get motivated easily.

My Own Study:

I really wanted to complete the exam within 2 months after completing the class, but due to personal commitments it got extended to 4 months. Every-day I use to spend at the least 2-3 hours reading PMBOK 5th Edition, Rita Mulchay. This really solidified my understanding that was gained in the Classroom training. 

In the last one or two months I use to keep on giving Mock Tests in the early mornings (4 -7 am) and then review them after coming back from work (7 – 8 pm), I kept on giving mock test from various places and was not be very subjective in selecting the source for exam. I felt that giving these mock tests really boosted my confidence and triggered to schedule the exam. While doing the mock tests most of the times I was in panic and I didn’t read all options and selected the wrong one. Rita Mulcahy’s recommendation helped. I read the options from D to A instead of A to D. This really increased my hit percentage.

My PMP Exam Experience:

I became a member, filled in my application, got my references and waited for a week to get it approved; luckily it was not selected for any audit. That was half way done, second challenge was to schedule the exam. I kept on giving mock tests until I had the confidence and was hitting 75-80% in mock tests. This triggered me to schedule an exam, at this time I just wanted it to get over at the earliest; luckily I found a date that was within 10 days and scheduled the exam on that day.

I had formulated this strategy of completing 70 questions in an hour so I will be done within 3 hours at the max (200 questions) this I kept on applying while taking the mock tests and this strategy was quiet successful for me.

On the Test day, I was faced with a flurry of Mathematical questions (20-25) from Question No#1 with all confusing stuffs and very wordy; I was very stressed, then I remember reading somewhere that even if you are stressed and if you manage to keep a smile on your face you can beat the stress. I applied the same and was able to get over the initial surprises in the exam. There were lots of situational questions, I was confused in lots of places; I marked them and kept on moving forward without worrying about the lengthy or wordy questions and kept on answering whichever I could. Finally, by the time I was done with 200 questions, it was like 2:30 hours; so I went back and selected all the unanswered and marked ones and slowly went through each one of them, now ‘smile’ factor worked and was able to easily and clearly read the questions and answer them. I completed all left outs within 45 minutes. Now I started reviewing again from beginning and just kept on speed reading questions and selected answers just to make sure that I did them correctly. The PMP really puts a toll on you with all sorts of Mathematical, Situational, and Tricky Questions, the initial impact of the questions is really intended to create stress, if you overcome that then you would be able to score very easily. During the exam I read the answers from D to A instead of A to D, I found this to be very helpful against panic answering due to stress.

Suggestions for PMP Aspirants:

– Dos

  • Please read PMBOK at the least twice, it is very helpful and answer to PMBOK and not to your personal experiences.
  • Please take any book like Rita or Andy Crowe or Head First and complete them once before kick starting the mock tests.
  • Please keep a smile on your face, even though you are stressed, this will help relieve stress and get back to your senses while taking test, if you are in panic answering mode read the answers from D to A than from A to D this will improve your hit rate, these helped me.
  • Please do take 10-15 mock tests before attempting the exam, this really helped me understand where I stand and what my weakness is and helped to motivate and improve.
  • Real life PM experience helps a lot while answering these questions during the exam.

– Don’ts

  • Don’t waste time prolonging the exam, use your time wisely and complete it at the earliest.
  • Having too many materials won’t help as you will be confused when to complete them, don’t get overburdened.

Conclusion:

After earning PMP I am much relived, I can see the fruits of hard work getting paid off. Whenever you say that you are PMP, there is a peer respect, because all of them know how much committed you need to be to earn this prestigious qualification. I now see what things at work do work and what not and how they are interrelated. PMP is not just a one-time process, you can apply this leanings in each every aspect of your life which you are doing unconsciously. Finally If I CAN DO IT ANY ONE CAN. You just need to remove the mental block and open up and think more in terms with best practices put forward by PMBOK, and your personal commitment.

Brief Profile: 

I am Aswin Krishnan H and am a Project Manager with Hewlett-Packard, India. I have 9 years of experience in Telecom, Retail and Security Domain with .NET Platform. 

 

                                                           ******************************

 

Aswin’s online PMP credential is available at PMI’s online credential registry.

1

I am thankful to Aswin for sharing his journey in achieving the PMP certification. I believe it will help you – the PMP aspirant – to have your own.

This article was originally published on managementyogi.blogspot.in

KnowledgeHut

KnowledgeHut

Author

KnowledgeHut is an outcome-focused global ed-tech company. We help organizations and professionals unlock excellence through skills development. We offer training solutions under the people and process, data science, full-stack development, cybersecurity, future technologies and digital transformation verticals.
Website : https://www.knowledgehut.com

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Project Manager Salary Guide 2021

Project management skills and expertise are in demand globally, and earning potential remains promising. The Project Management Institute (PMI)regularly runs a salary survey to find out what kind of salary project managers draw across industries and across geographies. This is probably one of the most comprehensive salary surveys conducted for any job type. Earning Power: Project Management Salary Survey—Eleventh Edition (2020), the latest salary survey from the Project Management Institute (PMI) equips practitioners with the most comprehensive view of project managers’ earnings from 42 countries around the world.  Greater awareness of how skill level, experience and certifications impact salary can give practitioners considerable earning power in a dynamic job market. And this critical data can help recruiters, human resources and compensation professionals establish fair and equitable salaries for project management roles within their organizations. Some of the data you will discover in this PMI report might surprise you. In this article, we give you the complete lowdown on the findings of the survey.Data gathered The scale of the PMI salary survey is vast: over 32,000+ project managers across industries and verticals, across the globe. This sample size is a good representative of the population and provides a realistic representation of salary figures. Quite a wide variety of information is collected by PMI’s team – position, years of PM experience, highest formal education, degree in project management, PMP® status, training per year, type of project, avg team size, project budget, and many more – from the sample size from each of the 42 countries. The report is of about 360 pages long, with quite a detailed information segregated by countries.One can thus slice and dice the figures to extract an amazing amount of insights into how project management in general and PMP certification can impact the salary of employees across industries, verticals, positions, and geographies. The top3 countries The top 3 countries on median salary figures were: Switzerland ($132,086) United States ($116,000) Australia ($101,381)The verdict “There’s never been a better time to be a project manager”, states the PMI Salary Survey, Eleventh Edition (2020).But what the report truly indicates is that there has never been a better time to be a PMP® certified project manager. The final verdict? Here it is: Respondents with PMP® certification report 22% higher median salaries than those without PMP® certification. Project Manager salary ranges Candidates with a PMP certification are prioritized over non-certified candidates. They are also more likely to get better compensation. However, the median salary depends on several factors such as their country of residence, years of experience, position or role and the average size of projects managed, including average project budget and average project team size. Project Manager salaries by countryCountriesMedian SalaryUSA$116,000India$28,750Singapore$71,279Hong Kong$76,607United Arab Emirates$81,665Project Manager salaries by years of experienceYearsUSAIndiaSingaporeHong KongUnited Arab Emirates
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Project Management: What’s Trending in 2021

Project management is the practice that is used to initiate, design, execute, control, and close a team's work in order to reach specific objectives and fulfil specific success criteria at the specified time. The main challenge of project management is to achieve all project objectives within the given limits.A decade ago, managing projects was difficult and challenging. It was difficult to set clear goals with less project management tools and projects were being managed by smaller teams with simpler projects.Fast forwarding to 2020, the scenario is completely different as Project Management seems like a phoenix rising from the ashes. The teams are no longer small, nor are the tasks, and the goals are defined with a proper system.The project management industry is quickly evolving, keeping pace with advanced technologies, tools, and the latest trends.Today, we will discuss the top 5 Project Management global trends in 2020.1. Artificial Intelligence (AI) & Automation Will Impact ProjectsArtificial Intelligence has had a very positive impact on projects. According to a PMI report, software development, aerospace, healthcare and financing all implement Artificial Intelligence in their way of managing projects.The first thing project managers need to do is take AI into account in project management and then learn how to utilize it for successfully completing projects.Using AI in automating data will make it easier to handle projects than before. Moreover, you can form positive business relationships with your team members and clients, resulting in proper coordination and transparency.It’s quite common to witness poor estimates and unknown external factors pushing the deadline. Artificial intelligence can calculate the duration, cost and progress of a project properly and predict realistic project schedules.2. More Project Managers Will Incorporate Hybrid Project ManagementEvery project is created differently and differs in methodology and execution. No wonder the concept of hybrid project management is becoming increasingly popular and with every passing day, many Project managers and Scrum masters are combining more than one methodology.According to PMI reports, Hybrid project management aims to combine standard project management techniques with the agile methodology.When the hybrid model, such as combining a traditional approach is implemented with an Agile process, team members from different points of view and work styles will collaborate and achieve more flexibility, dedication, and productivity in their own way.Project managers are inclining to this flexible approach of projects in the current year. A combination of agile and traditional methodologies is best suited in a multi-project environment, where complex parts are executed using agile, and a traditional method is used for the simpler parts.3. Managing Projects Will Become Easier with Emotional Intelligence (EI)It seems strange, but project success is related to humans understanding and realizing emotions. How? According to PMI.org emotional intelligence can strongly predict performance no matter what job you do. It allows clients, team members, sponsors and management to interact with each other with clarity, handle challenges efficiently and make committed choices to act strategically and swiftly. EI is now an essential technology for a successful business outcome.Understanding the emotions of the team members and dealing with different personalities ensures that the project keeps progressing at a smooth and constant pace. 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The language aid is provided only for the PMP® examination questions and answers.What is the Blueprint of the PMP® Examination?The PMP® examination blueprint, which is depicted in the table below defines the proportion of questions which are asked from each domain. These percentages determine the number of questions that will appear in the examination, covering all the domains and process groups of the project management. The following is the blueprint:Blueprint of the PMP® ExamDomainPercentage of QuestionsInitiation13%Planning24%Execution31%Monitoring and Controlling25%Closing7%TOTAL100%Further, let’s discuss the domains, tasks, knowledge and skill statements which are defined by the Role Delineation Study. There are multiple tasks under each domain which are measured through the process of PMP® certification.Domain I, Initiating - 13%Task 1: Carry out a project assessment based on the available information, meetings with stakeholders, and the lessons which are learned from the previous projects.Task 2: Figure out the key deliverables to direct the achievement of project goals and manage customer expectations based on the business requirements.Task 3: Use appropriate tools and techniques to perform stakeholder analysis so that expectations can be aligned and support can be gained for the project.Task 4: Recognise high-level risks, constraints, and assumptions based on the historical data, current environment, organisational factors, and expert judgement, so that an implementation strategy can be proposed.Task 5: Engage in the process of development of project charter by compiling and analyzing the gathered information so that it is ensured that the project stakeholders agree on its elements.Task 6: Acquire the project charter approval from the sponsor, so that the authority assigned to the project manager can be assigned, while at the same time commitment and acceptance can be gained.Task 7: Perform benefit analysis with relevant stakeholders so that the project alignment with organizational strategy can be validated.Task 8: Ensure that there is a common understanding of the key deliverables, milestones, as well as their roles and responsibilities by informing the stakeholders of the approved project charter.Knowledge and SkillsAnalytical skillsBenefit analysis techniquesElements of a project charterEstimation tools and techniquesStrategic managementDomain II, Planning - 24%Task 1: Based on the project charter and lessons learned, review and assess the project requirements, constraints and assumptions with the stakeholders.Task 2: Based on the approved project scope and using scope management techniques, develop scope management so that the scope of the project can be defined, maintained and managed.Task 3: Based on the project scope, resources, schedule, approved project charter, and other information, plan the cost management using estimating techniques so that the project costs can be managed.Task 4: Based on the approved project deliverables and milestones, scope, and resource management plans, develop the project schedule so that a scheduled completion of the project can be managed.Task 5: Come up with a Project Resource Management plan where the roles and responsibilities of the project team members can be defined so that a project organizational structure can be created and guidance can be formed regarding how resources will be managed and assigned.Task 6: Work on a communication management plan which will be based on the project organizational structure and stakeholder requirements, so that the flow of project information can be defined and managed.Task 7: Based on the project scope, budget, and schedule, create a procurement management plan. This ensures that the required project resources will be available.Task 8: To prevent the occurrence of defects while at the same time control the cost of quality, come up with a quality management plan to define the quality standards for the project and its products which will be based on the project scope, risks, and requirements.Task 9: Work on change management so that the changes can be managed and tracked.Task 10: Develop a risk management plan. Identify, analyse and prioritize the project risk; create a risk register, and define risk response strategy to do so. This way, the uncertainty and opportunity throughout the project life cycle can be managed.Task 11: Present the project management plan to the relevant stakeholders in accordance with the applicable policies and procedures, so the approval to proceed with the project execution can be attained.Task 12: Conduct kick-off meeting, communicate the start of the project, and other relevant information to engage stakeholders and gain commitment.Task 13: Develop a stakeholder management plan after analyzing the needs and potential impact so that the stakeholders’ expectations can be managed and can be engaged in project decisions.Knowledge and SkillsChange management planningCommunications planningEstimation tools and techniquesLean and efficiency principlesQuality management planningRegulatory and environmental impacts assessment planningScope deconstruction (e.g., WBS, Scope backlog) tools and techniquesStakeholder management planningWorkflow diagramming techniquesCost management planning, including project budgeting tools and techniquesContract types and selection criteriaHuman resource planningProcurement planningRequirements gathering techniquesRisk management planningScope management planningTime management planning, including scheduling tools and techniquesDOMAIN III, Executing - 31%Task 1: Follow the human resource and procurement management plans by obtaining and managing the project resources so that the project requirements can be met.Task 2: Lean and develop the project team to manage the task execution based on the project management plan so that the project deliverables can be achieved.Task 3: Use appropriate tools and techniques to implement a quality management plan. This is done to ensure that the work is being performed as per the required quality standards.Task 4: Follow the change management plan to implement the approved changes and corrective actions so that the project requirements can be met.Task 5: Follow the risk management plan to implement the approved actions so that the impact of risks can be minimized while at the same time, the advantage of opportunities on the project can be attained. ‘Task 6: Follow the communication plan and manage the flow of information so that the stakeholders are kept engaged and informed.Task 7: Follow the stakeholder management plan to maintain the stakeholder relationship so that continued support can be received and expectations can be managed.Knowledge and SkillsContinuous improvement processesElements of a statement of workProject budgeting tools and techniquesVendor management techniquesContract management techniquesInterdependencies among project elementsQuality standard toolsDomain IV, Monitoring and Controlling - 25%Task 1: Use appropriate tools and techniques to measure the project performance so that any variance and corrective actions can be identified and quantified.Task 2: Follow the change in the management plan and manage changes to the project so that the project goal remains aligned with the business needs.Task 3: Use appropriate tools and techniques to meet project requirements and business needs in order to verify that the project deliverables conform to the quality standards which has been established in the quality management plan.Task 4: Monitor and assess the risk to determine if exposure has changed and evaluated the effectiveness of response strategies so that the impact of risks and opportunities on the project can be managed.Task 5: Review and update the issue log as well as determine corrective measures by using appropriate tools and techniques so that the impact on the project can be minimized.Task 6: Use lessons learned management techniques to capture, analyze, and manage the lessons learned so that continuous improvement can be attained.Task 7: According to the procurement plan, monitor the procurement activities so that the compliance with project activities can be verified.Knowledge and SkillsPerformance measurement and tracking techniquesProject control limitsProject monitoring tools and techniquesQuality measurement toolsRisk response techniquesProcess analysis techniquesProject finance principlesProject quality best practices and standardsRisk identification and analysis techniquesQuality validation and verification techniquesDomain V, Closing - 7%Task I: Collect the final acceptance of the project deliverables from the relevant stakeholders as confirmation that the project scope and deliverables were achieved.Task II: According to the project plan, transfer the ownership of deliverables to the assigned stakeholders so that the project closure can be facilitated.Task III: Obtain financial, legal and administrative closure via the accepted practices and policies so that a formal closure of the project can be attained and a transfer of liability can be ensured.Task IV: According to the communications management plan, prepare and share the final project report so that the project performance can be documented and conveyed as well as project evaluation can be assisted.Task V: Collect and combine the lessons that were learned throughout the project and conduct a project review so that the organization’s knowledge base can be updated.Task VI: Archive the materials and project documents by making use of the generally accepted practices so that statutory requirements can be complied with and for potential use in future projects and audits.Task VII: Use appropriate tools and techniques to get feedback from relevant stakeholders so that their satisfaction can be evaluated.Knowledge and SkillsArchiving practices and statutesContract closure requirementsFeedback techniquesProject review techniquesActive listeningBenefits realizationBusiness acumenCoaching, mentoring, training, and motivational techniquesConfiguration managementCustomer satisfaction metricsDecision makingDiversity and cultural sensitivityExpert judgment techniqueGenerational sensitivity and diversityInterpersonal skillsLeadership tools, techniques, and skillsMeeting management techniquesOrganizational and operational awarenessPresentation tools and techniquesProblem-solving tools and techniquesQuality assurance and control techniquesRisk assessment techniquesStakeholder management techniquesVirtual/remote team managementCompliance (statute/organization)Close-out proceduresPerformance measurement techniquesTransition planning techniqueApplicable laws and regulationsBrainstorming techniquesChange management techniquesCommunication channels, tools, techniques, and methodsConflict resolutionData gathering techniquesDelegation techniquesEmotional intelligenceFacilitationInformation management tools, techniques, and methodsKnowledge managementLessons learned management techniquesNegotiating and influencing techniques and skillsPeer-review processesPrioritization/time managementProject finance principlesRelationship managementSituational awarenessTeam-building techniquesTips for passing and preparing for PMP® ExamPMP® exam requires a lot of dedication and efforts in order to clear it at one go. The following tips will surely help you to prepare and pass your PMP® exam:Memorise all formulas to easily answer the math questions.Spend around 4 hours to practice full sample exams at one sitting.On the day of your exam, use your time effectively to answer 200 questions within 4 hours. You will have 1 minute to answer each question.Answer all questions, do not leave any question blank.Use the process of elimination for obviously incorrect answer options to maximise probability in case you are not sure about the correct answer.Avoid spending too much time on any single question. If you are spending more than 2 minutes on a single question then you can make your best guess for the answer and mark it for review at the end of the exam.Try to reserve the last 10 minutes to review the marked questions.Read all the answer options before selecting an answer.Keep in mind that some questions may provide hints to other questions in the exam.Wear comfortable cloth and footwear on the day of your exam.To wrap it up!The PMP® certification acts as a validation of a professional’s experience in project management and is a challenging process as well. Start preparing well for the five domains (Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing) in advance so that you can ace the examination and get nearer to achieving your dream career. All the best!
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The PMP® Exam Blueprint For 2021

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