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All You Need to Know About Project Management Professional

 Abstract Why does the PMP certification holds such importance and what are the processes involved? There are certain tips and tricks to know about it. Read on to find out! Content The Project Management Institute offers the industry-recognized certification for all the Project Managers in the form of Project Management Professional (PMP). There is no focus on any niche, domain, or geography and the application of this certification is universal. Thus, this widely increases its importance and gives more scope to the 773,840 active PMP certified individuals in 210 different countries of the world. In order to qualify for this certification, a person needs to satisfy some prerequisites which include Secondary degree with 7,500 hours of leading projects or a four-year degree with 4,500 hours of leading projects. 35 hours of education pertaining to project management. Here is the basic process which is involved in project management: Initiating The overall direction of the project is set here and the objectives for the particular project are defined. There is only one detailed sub-process at this stage and it is: Concept Development This process involves describing what will be the product of the project along with the documentation of the objectives which are designed initially. A project manager is also assigned who can take care of the responsibility in the best possible manner. Planning One important thing to remember is that there is only one chance to get the project right so there is no room for error. This is the reason that effective planning is required at an earlier stage so that the rest of the process can be carried out smoothly. There are a lot of details involved in this section and a number of sub-processes are here too: Scope Definition A written statement regarding the scope of the project is developed and includes the basic justifications along with deliverables of the project. Project Definition The deliverables are broken down into small and achievable granules so that there is better control over each and every aspect of the project. Task Definition and Sequencing All the tasks which will be performed to achieve the objectives will be defined and their sequence will be developed after checking their dependencies on each other. Duration Estimation and Schedule Development Estimating the duration of the entire project as well as the individual tasks and assigning specific dates for completion. Cost Estimation and Budgeting The initial and detailed costs of the individual tasks and the entire project are specified. Quality Planning This is done to ensure that the project meets all the quality standards which have been set by any governing body. Defining the Roles and Responsibilities Determining the individual roles and how they will combine to ensure the deliverables of the project. Project Staffing Hiring those who are perfect to perform the jobs and can take up the responsibilities to fulfill them in the best way. Communications Planning Deciding what kind of information will be needed by different individuals and how will it reach them on time. Risk Identification and Assessment First of all, the potential risks are determined which are likely to affect the project. Afterward, the probability of the risk is evaluated and its impact is calculated. This helps in getting rid of the risks and finding the best counterplan for them. Procurement Negotiating for outside sources, products, and getting contractual services. Executing The execution step in the project management has little to do with details as they are already catered to in the planning process. It is just the execution of everything which has already been discussed and talked about previously. There are only two sub-processes here: Plan Execution All the planned tasks are performed while the technical and organizational interfaces are managed alongside. Contract Administration Managing the outsourced staff and resources is entirely different than managing everything which is already a part of your company. Special care and attention need to be given to this aspect. Controlling A lot of control and measures need to be observed if one wants to ensure that the project goes according to the plan. Even variances are adjusted into the plan and repetitions are made to ensure that the plan satisfies the changing needs of the project. Here are the important steps which are involved in the controlling process: Measurement of Progress All the information pertaining to the progress of the project is collected and then disseminated to the people involved. Quality Control Measuring the deliverables of the project to ensure that all the standards of quality are met while executing the project. Quality Improvement Assessing the processes regularly to see how the quality of the project and the deliverables can be improved. Cost Control Controlling the cost and ensuring that the designated budget is being followed. If a change in the cost is absolutely necessary then incorporating it into the plan and then implementing it. Risk Control Even the risk factors can change over time as the project develops so corresponding to the risks and mitigating them is essential. Time Control Going according to the schedule and incorporating all the changes in the time are essential so that the project is delivered right on time. Closing This is the last phase of the project management and includes only three other processes: Scope Verification This is to ensure that the deliverables have been completed and the results are satisfactory. The deliverables actually match the objective of the project. Contract Close-Out All the outstanding administration matters are catered to and documentation is achieved which ensures safe and complete resolution of the project. Project Closure The project is given the final touches and is rendered towards completion formally. All the matters are taken care of and there is nothing left which requires special attention from the project manager or any other staff member. Project Management Professional course ensures to guide the person with complete knowledge of handling a project and helps in the growth of the professional life. Thus, enrolling yourself in this course definitely means a boost for your career.

All You Need to Know About Project Management Professional

4K
All You Need to Know About Project Management Professional

 Abstract

Why does the PMP certification holds such importance and what are the processes involved? There are certain tips and tricks to know about it. Read on to find out!

Content

The Project Management Institute offers the industry-recognized certification for all the Project Managers in the form of Project Management Professional (PMP). There is no focus on any niche, domain, or geography and the application of this certification is universal. Thus, this widely increases its importance and gives more scope to the 773,840 active PMP certified individuals in 210 different countries of the world.

In order to qualify for this certification, a person needs to satisfy some prerequisites which include

  • Secondary degree with 7,500 hours of leading projects or a four-year degree with 4,500 hours of leading projects.
  • 35 hours of education pertaining to project management.

Here is the basic process which is involved in project management:

Initiating

The overall direction of the project is set here and the objectives for the particular project are defined. There is only one detailed sub-process at this stage and it is:

Concept Development

This process involves describing what will be the product of the project along with the documentation of the objectives which are designed initially. A project manager is also assigned who can take care of the responsibility in the best possible manner.

Planning

One important thing to remember is that there is only one chance to get the project right so there is no room for error. This is the reason that effective planning is required at an earlier stage so that the rest of the process can be carried out smoothly. There are a lot of details involved in this section and a number of sub-processes are here too:

Scope Definition

A written statement regarding the scope of the project is developed and includes the basic justifications along with deliverables of the project.

Project Definition

The deliverables are broken down into small and achievable granules so that there is better control over each and every aspect of the project.

Task Definition and Sequencing

All the tasks which will be performed to achieve the objectives will be defined and their sequence will be developed after checking their dependencies on each other.

Duration Estimation and Schedule Development

Estimating the duration of the entire project as well as the individual tasks and assigning specific dates for completion.

Cost Estimation and Budgeting

The initial and detailed costs of the individual tasks and the entire project are specified.

Quality Planning

This is done to ensure that the project meets all the quality standards which have been set by any governing body.

Defining the Roles and Responsibilities

Determining the individual roles and how they will combine to ensure the deliverables of the project.

Project Staffing

Hiring those who are perfect to perform the jobs and can take up the responsibilities to fulfill them in the best way.

Communications Planning

Deciding what kind of information will be needed by different individuals and how will it reach them on time.

Risk Identification and Assessment

First of all, the potential risks are determined which are likely to affect the project. Afterward, the probability of the risk is evaluated and its impact is calculated. This helps in getting rid of the risks and finding the best counterplan for them.

Procurement

Negotiating for outside sources, products, and getting contractual services.

Executing

The execution step in the project management has little to do with details as they are already catered to in the planning process. It is just the execution of everything which has already been discussed and talked about previously. There are only two sub-processes here:

Plan Execution

All the planned tasks are performed while the technical and organizational interfaces are managed alongside.

Contract Administration

Managing the outsourced staff and resources is entirely different than managing everything which is already a part of your company. Special care and attention need to be given to this aspect.

Controlling

A lot of control and measures need to be observed if one wants to ensure that the project goes according to the plan. Even variances are adjusted into the plan and repetitions are made to ensure that the plan satisfies the changing needs of the project. Here are the important steps which are involved in the controlling process:

Measurement of Progress

All the information pertaining to the progress of the project is collected and then disseminated to the people involved.

Quality Control

Measuring the deliverables of the project to ensure that all the standards of quality are met while executing the project.

Quality Improvement

Assessing the processes regularly to see how the quality of the project and the deliverables can be improved.

Cost Control

Controlling the cost and ensuring that the designated budget is being followed. If a change in the cost is absolutely necessary then incorporating it into the plan and then implementing it.

Risk Control

Even the risk factors can change over time as the project develops so corresponding to the risks and mitigating them is essential.

Time Control

Going according to the schedule and incorporating all the changes in the time are essential so that the project is delivered right on time.

Closing

This is the last phase of the project management and includes only three other processes:

Scope Verification

This is to ensure that the deliverables have been completed and the results are satisfactory. The deliverables actually match the objective of the project.

Contract Close-Out

All the outstanding administration matters are catered to and documentation is achieved which ensures safe and complete resolution of the project.

Project Closure

The project is given the final touches and is rendered towards completion formally. All the matters are taken care of and there is nothing left which requires special attention from the project manager or any other staff member.

Project Management Professional course ensures to guide the person with complete knowledge of handling a project and helps in the growth of the professional life. Thus, enrolling yourself in this course definitely means a boost for your career.

Jacob

Jacob Arch

Blog Author

Jacob Arch is an entrepreneur and has twenty years working experience in a multinational company Assignment Service UK. He writes articles and blogs for e-zines and tech journals as well
 

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